Skip to main content

Full text of "The Southern harmony, and musical companion : containing a choice collection of tunes, hymns, psalms, odes, and anthems ; selected from the most eminent authors in the United States ; together with nearly one hundred new tunes, which have never before been published ..."

See other formats


i SOUTHERN HARMONY, AND MUSICAL COMPANION: 

r" COMTAJNINB t UHOILE COLLfST! i-^ ^» 

TUNES, HYMNS, PSALMS, ODES, AXD ANTHEMS; 

^;2 SELECTED FROM THE MOST EMINENT AUTHORS LN THE UNITED STATES; 

'^>\ TOOBTBia WITH 

NEARLY ONE HUNDRED NEW TUNES, WEIGH HAVE NEVER BEFORE BEEN PUBLISHED ; 

SUITED TO MOST OF THE METRES CONTAINED IN WATTS'S HYMNS AND PSALMS, MERCEk'S CLUSTER, DOSSEY's 
CHOICE, DOVER SELECTION, METHODIST HYMN BOOK, AND BAPTIST HARMONY; 

ADD VrtLL IBArTID TO 

CHfUSTIAN CHURCHES OF EVERY DENOMINATION. S /.■AQ SCHOOLS, AND PRIVATE SOCIETIES: 
AL30. AN EASY INTRODUCTiON TO THE GROUNDS OF MUSIC, THE RUKl'^NTS OP MUSIC, AND PLAIN RULES FOR BEGINNERS 



BT WnUAH WALKER. 



SIdi uio Sod, fa klngiloiiu erth* ewth : O ilnt pr'^ito tinle tb* Lot^.— Ditid. 

8p«akiDg to fMuitlTM la pialu, u4 hrmut, anc apirliital vmf, •InfinK und making milody in jrour taearU to Ihi Lord.— ri«i_ 

KSW EDrnOK, TEOEOUaBXT SETISFD AVO XVCH SHLABGXD. 



PUBLISHED BY E. W. MILLER, 1102 and 1104 SANSOM STREET, 

AND FOB BALK BT • 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.. and BOOKSELLERS, GENERALLY, THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. 






*^^' 




[HUBYltBiAN rilSpiCALJOCIirji; 



^776 



0Ufb~7^^ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Calvin College 



http://www.archive.org/details/southernharnionymOOwalk 



SOUTHERN HARMONY, AND MUSICAL GOMPANIOM; 

contjlinu<o a choice collectiox or 

TUNES, HYMNS, PSALMS, ODES, AND ANTHEMS; 

SELKCTED FROM THE MOST EMINENT AUTHORS IN THE UNITED STATES: 

TOGETHER WITH 

KEARLY ONE HUrJDRED NEW TUNES, WHICH HAVE NEVER BEFORE BEEN PUBUSHED ; 

St.'ITED TO MOST OF THE METKES CONTAINED IN WATTS's HYMNS AND PSALMS, MERGER'S CLUSTER, OOSSEV & 
CHOICE, DOVER SELECTION, 5IETH0DIST HYMN BOOK, AND BAPTIST HARMONY; 

4ND WELL ADAPTL:D ^O 

CHRISTIAN CHURCHES OF EVERY DENOMINATION, SINGING SCHOOLS, AND PRIVATE SOCIETIES: 

ilSO. AN EASY IKTRODUCTION TO THE GROUNDS OF KUSIC, THE RUDIMENTS OF IIUSIC, AND PLAIN RULES FOR BEGINNERS 



BY WILLIAM WALKER. 



t^ing un:o God, ye kingdoms of the canh : O sirig praises unto ilie Lord.— Uaved. 

Bpc-aking 10 yourselves in psalms, and hymns, and spiritual songs, singing and making melody In your hearls In the Lord— I' » it- 

HEvV EDITION, THOHOUGHLY REVISED AI^D MUCH ENIASGED. 
PniLADELPniA: 

PUBLISHED BY E. W. MILLER, 1102 and 1101 SANSOil STREET. 

AND FOR SALE BY 

J. B. LirriNCO'l'T & CO., AND B001v'SKLT,ER,S, OKNEUALLY, TIIllOUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. 



PREFACE TO NEW EDITION. 

TuE Autnor, feeling grateful to a generous public for tne very liberal patronage Tvhich they have given the former editions of 
the SocTUERN Harmony, has endeavoured to remedy the only deficiency -which he has heard mentioned, by adding a large number 
of good tunes for church use, together with several excellent new pieces never before published, which has enlarged the work about 
forty pages, and makes it one of the largest Music Books ever offered at the same price. Therefore he hopes to secure that continued 
and increased patronage which it may merit from those who love the Songs of Zion. 

WILLIAM WALKER. 

Spautancueo, S. C, January, lSi7. 



PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION. 

Since the Soutiiern IlARsroNY was first published, many of the tunes having gone out of use, the AutJior determined to revise 
the work, and leave out those pieces, and supply their places with good new tunes, which have been selected for their intrinsic worth, 
and great popularity, and highly devotional character. He has also enlarged the work with thirty-two pages of excellent music, 
many of the tunes being suitable for revival occasions. All of which he hopes will be found entirely satisfactory to the many friends 
and patrons of the Southern ITarmonj/. 

The Author now tenders his grateful thanks to a generous and enlightened public for the very flattering manner in which the 
former editions of this work have been received, and hopes that this revised edition may be duly appreciated, and the demand for it 
increase as its merits may deserve. 

WILLIAM WALKER. 

SPAETANBUBa, S. C, July, 1854. 



EntireJ, according to tha Act of Congress, In the year 1847, byWiLiiui Wilich, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the E«stern I>istrii» ol PrnnajlTanu. 



PREFACE TO FORMER EDITION. 



The compiler of this work, having been solicited for several years by his brother teachers, pupils, and other friends, lo publish a 
work of this kind, has consented to yield to their solicitations. 

In treating upon the rudiments of Music, 1 have endeavoured to lead the pupil on step by step, from A, B, C, in the gamut, to the 
more abstruse parts of this delightful science, having inserted the gamut as it should be learned, in a pleasing conversation between 
the pupil and his teacher. 

In selecting the Tunes, Hymns, and Anthems, I have endeavoured to gratify the taste of all, and supply the churches with a 
number of good, plain tunes, suited to the various metres contained in their different Hymn Books. 

While those that are fond of fuged tunes have not been neglected, I have endeavoured to make this book a complete Musical 
Companion for the aged as well as the youth. Those that are partial to ancient music, will here find some good old acquaintances 
which will cause them to remember with pleasure the scenes of life that are past and gone; while my youthful companions, v\-ho 
are more fond of modern music, I hope will find a sufficient number of new tunes to satisfy them, as I have spared no pains in trying 
to select such tunes as would meet the wishes of the public. 

I have also selected a number of excellent new Songs, and printed l^em under the tunes, which I hope will be found satisfactory. 

Some object to new publications of music, because the compilers alter the tunes. I have endeavoured to select the tunes from 
original authors. Where this could not be done, and the tune having six or seven basses and trebles, I have selected those I thought 
most consistent with the rules of composition. 

I have composed the parts to a great many good airs, (which I could not find in any publication, nor in manuscript,) and assigned 
my name as the author. I have also composed several tunes wholly, and inserted them in this work, which also bear my name. 

The compiler now commends this work to the public, praying God that it may be a means of advancing this important and 
flflightful science, and of cheering the weary pilgrim on hi? way to the telestial city above. 

WILLIAM WALKER 

SDttTianhuig. S. C, September 1835 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



PART FIRST. 

OF MUSIC. 

PcriL. What is Music ? 

TsACHEB. Music is a succession of pleasing sounds. 

P. On wli.it is music written ? 

T. On five psrallel lines including the spaces between them, which is called a 
stave ; and tnese lines and spaces are represented by the first seven letters in the 
alphabet, A, 13, C, D, E, F, and G. These letters also represent the seven sounds 
that belong to each key-note in music: when eight letters are used, the first is 
repeated. 

P. How many parts are there used in vocal music ! 

'1 . Commonly only four ; viz. Bass, Tenor, Counter, and Treble ; and the letters 
arc placed on the staves for the several parts in the following order, commencing at 
the space below the first line in each stave. 



BASS STAVE NATURAL. 



F Clef ^ 



me O 
-law-Q- 

BOI O 

-faw-ti- 
law D 

-sol-O- 
faw t^ 

-me-0- 
law |— i 



Space above. 
-Fifth line. 

Fourth .space. 
-Fourth line. 

Third space. 
-Third line. 

Second space. 
-Second line. 

First space. 



taw ^ 



TENOR OK TREBLE STAVE NATimAL. 

G sol O 

F favv-t^- 

E law n 

D sol-O- 

C faw I\ 

B me— O— 

A law n 

G sol -O- 

F faw [\ 

law-C— 

sol O 



COUNTER STAG'S NATUKAL. 



E 



law □ 
-sol-O- 

faw £i 
-law-C— 

sol O 
-faw-Ci,- 
O 
-law-i_- 

sol O 
-faw-!\— 

law D 



Space above. 
-Fifth line. 

Fourth sjiaco. 
-Fourth line. 

Third space. 
-Third line. 

Second space. 
-Second line. 

First space. 
-First line. 

Space below. 



Space above 
—Fifth line. 

Fourth space. 
—Fourth line. 

Third space. 
-Third line. 

Second space. 
-Second Ime. 

First space. 
-First line. 

Space below. 



You may observe that the letters arc named or called by the names of the four 
notes used in music. You see in the above staves that F is named faw, C sol, A 
law, B me, C faw, D snl, E law, and F faw again ; every eighth letter being the firsi 
repeated, which is an oclavc ; for every eighth is an octave. 

P. How many notes are there used in music, what are their names, and how are 
they made ) 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS JF MUSIC 



T All holes ot music wnicn represent sounds are called by fojr names, and each 
30te ia known by its shape, viz. ; the me is a diamond, faw is triangle, sol is round, 
*ncl 'aw is square. See the example. 

EXAMPLE. 

me faw boI law 




-±p^t:t 



Square. 



How 



P, But in some music books the tunes are written in round notes entirely 
i!o we know by what names to call the notes in these books 1 * 

T. By first finding the me for me is the governing and leading note ; and when 
that is found, the notes on the liaes and spaces in regular succession arc called, faw, 
sol, law, faw, sol, law, (twice,) and those below the me, law, so), faw, law, sol, faw, 
Ctwice ;) after which me will come again. Either way, see the foilowin? — 

* For singing Doe, Rae, See, seven syllables and numerals, see p. xsxi. 

.■\s in the following example, viz. : 



& 



£l 



iE^^E±i 



XJ 



^ 



i 



This is the rule for singing rjund notes. You must therefore observe that the 
natural place for the me in parts of music is on that line or space represented by B. 

But if B be flat, t> me is on £ 

B I) and E b it is on .\ 

B b E 1> and .\ h it is on D 

B b E b A b and D b it is on G 

If F be sharp, # me is on F 

F if and C ^ it is on C 

F # C # andG if it ison O 

F # C # G if andD # itison 1) 



Me in its 
NArcR.ti. a place. 
Tenor or treble MB. 

-^ 


B Bal, mc 
isinE. 


Ba 

— b" 


He, transpo 

nd E flat 
is in A. 


sed by flats. 
B, E, an.l A Hat, 
mc is iu D. 

-fa S 


B, E, A, an,] D flal, 

zb™— 


F sharp, I7i« is 
inF. 

— #— 


Me, transposed by sharps. 

F and C sharp, in« F, C, G, sharp, vie 

is inc. isinti. 

—^ # ^ 


F, C, G, P, sharp, 1 
K«r IS in D. 


A ^ 


—b 


-b- 


-^ 


bfa 


-b 


h — t: 




*t o 


a o 


1+ 


Ky) 








^ 


o 








Counter me. 


US. 


UB. 


MB. 


MH. 


UB. 


KB. 


MB. 


jj. 1 






-. ^ 


J 


br-zr- 


)4v-^ 


# o 


if 


Ar-^ 


mS — r, 


- 


O 


-fa 


5 




-ry^ 




K 




— #— ^ 


-^ 


H+*? — '-^ 








^ 










^ o 


if 


BaS9 MB. 


MB. 


• 


— « 


UB. 


MB. 


sra. 


MB. 


us. 


UB. 


e. 




o 


—fa 


' o 


'b 


— ^ -© 


-H* 


~^^^ — 


.ffi-O- 






b - 


)l 


X . 




a o 


-# . 


— 








</ 


_ill> 




p 


«> 


1 — _ 


-#— -=-- 


L_ . . 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



P. How luany marks of sound or kinds of notes are there used in musicl 
T. Theifl are six kinds of notes used in music, which differ in time. They arc the 
eemibreve, minim, crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, and demisemiquaver. 

SCALE OF N0T£9. 

The following scale will show, at one view, the proportion ono note bears to another. 



One Semibreve 



Eight 



two ^f^f'y ^^ T ^ , 



Explain the ab'^ve si'aie. 



is equal in time M 



Minims, 



Crotchets, 



Quavers, 



Semiquavers, 




T. The semibreve is now the longest no«e used, it is white, without a stsm, 

and is the measure -<^ note, and guideth all the others 



The minim -p>- is but half the length of a semibreve, and jas a stem to it. 



The crotchet J is but half the length of the minim, and has a black head ana 
straight stem, -g- 



The quaver 
one turn to the 



is but half the length of the crotchet, has a black head, and 
stem, sometimes one way, and sometimes anotlier. 



The semiquaver I^ is but half the length of the quaver, has also a black hoaa 
and two turns to -^- the stem, which are likewise various. 

The demisemiquaver 4~_ is half the length of a semiquaver, has a black head, and 
(hre» turns to its stem, -S- also variously turned. 
"?" 

P. What are rests ! 

T. All rests are marks of silence, which signify that you must keep silent so long 
a time as takes to sound the notes they represent, except the semibreve rest, which 
is called the bar rest, always filling the bar, let the mood of time be what it may. 

THE RESTS. 

Demise rai- 
Semibreve. Minim. Crotchet. Quaver . Semiquaver. quaver. 








fo 


^W1 


•1 


M 








1 


1 


"-1 


-1 










1 




Two Bars. 




Four Bars. 


Kieht 


Bars. ' 








1 




H" 


l'^ 




B 


i 


1 



THE GAMUT, UR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



/'. Ex|ilain the rests. 

T. The scmibreve, or bar rc» , is a black square unJerncath the ihirJ line, 
riie minim rest is the same mark above the third lino. 
Tlie crotchet rest is somethini; like an inverted figure seven. 
The <|uaver rest resembles a right figure of seven. 

The semiquaver rest resembles the figure seven with an additional mark to the left. 
The demisemiquaver rest is like the last described, with a third murk to the left. 
The two bar rest is a strong bar reaching only across the third sfiace. 
The four bar rest is a strong bar crossing the second and third space and third line. 
The eight bar rest islwo strong bars like the last described. 

fVoTE. These notes are sounded sometimes quicker, and sometimes slower, accord- 
ing to the several moods of time. The notes of themselves always bear the same 
proportion to each other, whatever the mood of time may be. 

OF THE SEVERAL MOODS OF TIME. 

P. Please t«ll me how many moods of time there are in music. 

T. There are nine moods of lime used ; four of common, three of triple, and two 
of compound. 

P. Why arc the first four mooils called common time moods T 

T. Because they are measured by even numbers, as 2, 4, 8, &c. 

/'. Why are the next three called triple m:)-jds ? 

T. Because they are measured by odd numbers, having either three minims, three 
crotchets, or three quavers, in each bar. 

P. Why are the last two called compound time moods 1 

T. Because they are compounded of common anJ triple ; of common, as the bar is 
divided equal, the fall being equal to the rise in keeping time ; and. of triple, as each 
half of the bar is three fold; having either three crotchets, three quavers, or notes to 
that amount, to each beat. 

P. Please explain the several moods of time in their order. 



The second mood is known by a C with a bar -"- r i pa [ 

through it, has the same measure, sung in the time /p — SL[IZ'Z_ [^ ^ 

of three seconds — four i>eats in a bar, two down aiid — i- " -'^ 

two up. ' ~ 



MOODS OF COMMON TIMS 



The first mood is known by a plain C, and has a 

semibreve or iLs quantity in a measure, sung in the ^ — L; 

ume of foursecords-ftjc- ^— - ■- - ' '" '""'" ^^ — 

and two up. 



12;J4 12 



■ beats in a bar, two down ^^ 




The third mood is known by a C inverted, some' 
times with a b:ir through it, has the same measure -^—^ 
as the first two, sung in the time of two seconds — -jy— ?] 
two beats in a bar. This mood is sometimes 

marked with the figure i above 4, thus, -j^ 

The fourth mood is known by a figure 2 over a 
figure 4, has a minim for a measure no'e, sung in 
the time of one second — two beats in a bar, one down 
and the other up. 

MOOUS OF TniriE TIMS. 

The first mood of triple time is known by a figure ~ " rrri 

3 over a figure 2, has a pointed scmibreve, or three yjJ^^^rZ I 

minims in a measure, sung in the time of three -^ L_ -I 

seconds — three beats, two down and one up. ■ 




d d u d d a ddu 



The second mood is known by a figure 3 over s J, ^ 

has a pointed minim or three crotchets in a measure, xlI I . 

and sung in 2 seconds — three beats in a bar, two 

down and one up. d d 

1 3 3 12 3 123 

The third mood is known by the figure 3 above X?_ ^ _. -p—W- [-|»-^ 
figure 8, has three quavers in a measure, and sung -^ -[— ^ Z~Z^ 1 1 

in the time of one second — three beats in a bar, two ^ 1^ 1 Jl -J 

down and one up A A „ M n .kin 




THE GAMUT, OR RUUIJMENTS OF MUSIC. 





HOODS OF CO5IP0C5D TIME 
1 

The firat moo'l of comf our.J tiir.c is known by 
ilie figure 6 above figure 4, has six crotchets in a -. 
measure, sung in the lime of two seconils — two Ht 
beats in a bar, one down anil one up. 



The second mode of compound time is 
Known by the figure 6 above an 8, has six 
quavers in a measure, sung in the time of -ft 

one second and a half — two beats in a bar, ' 

one down and one up. d u d ti d u 

P. What do the figures over the bar, and the letters d and h unde it, in the above 
examples of time, mean ^ 

T. Tlie figures show how many beats th<ire are in each bar and the letter a 
shows when the hand must go down, and the u when up. 

P. What general rule is tliere for beating time ! 

T, That the hand fall at the beginning, and rise at the end of each bar, in all 
snoods of time. 

P. Do you suppose those moods, when expressed by figures, have any particular 
signification, more than being mere arbitrary characters 1 

T I think they have this signijicnnl meaning, that the lower figure shows how 
many parts or kinds of notes the semibreve is divided into, and the upper figure signi- 
fies how many of such notes or parts will fill a bar — for example, the first mood of 
compound time, (6 above 4,) shows the semibreve is divided into four parts — i.e. into 
crotchets, (for four crotchets arc equal to one semibreve;) and the upper figure 6 
shows that six of these parts, viz. crotchets, fill a bax. So of any other time expressed 
by figures. 

P. How shall we with sufficient exactness ascertain the proper time of each beat 
ji the different moods 1 

7'. Dy racking use of a pendulum, the cord of which, fi-om the centre of the ball 
10 the pin from which it is suspended, to he, for the several moods, of the following 
leo-jtiis • — 



\ For the first and third moods of common time, the first of triple 

and first of compound, [all requiring second beats,] 3Q 2-10 /»h-'>«i 

For the second mood of common, second of triple, and fcrst of 

compound, 22 1 10 

For the fourth of common 12 4 10 

For the third of triple time,' .■) 1-21 

Then for every swing or vibration of the ball, count one 'vat, accompanying th* 
motion with the hand, till something of a habit is formed, for the several moods of 
time, according to the difTerent lengths of the cord, as expressed abovft. 

Note. — If teachers would fall upon this or some other method, for ascertaming and 
keeping the true time, tliere would not be so much difficulty among singers, taught 
at difl'erent schools, about timing music together ; for it mutters not how well indi- 
vidual singers may perform, if, when several of them perform together, they do not 
keep time woll, they disgust, instead of pleasing their hearers. 



OF ACCENT 

P. What is meant by accent ' 

7'. Accent is a particular empnasis or swell of voice on a certain part of the mea- 
sure which is according to the subdivision of it, and is essential to a skilful perform- 
ance of music, as the chief intention of accent is to mark emphatical words more 
sensibly, and express the passions m^Te feelingly. If the poetry be good, and the 
music skilfully adapted, the important words will fall upon the accented parts of the 
bar. Should emphatical words hapi>-»-. on the unaccented part, the music should 
always bend to the words. 

i*. What part of the measure is accented in the several moods of time 1 

7'. The first three moods of common time are accented on the first and third notes 
in the measure when the bar is ilividcd into four equal [larts ; and the fourth mood is 
accented on the first part of the measure when only two notes are in a bar; ii four, 
accent as in the first three. In triple lime, when the measure is divided into thrt>c 
ecjual parts, the accent is on the first and third ; if only two notes arc in a bar, tt 
accent is always on the longest note. In compound lime the accent is on the first 
and fourth notes in the measure, when the bar is divided into six equal paits. 
Couplet accent is when two notes arc accented together, as two quavers in the fir>€ 
three moods in common time, or two crotchets in the first raooi! of tripl.' tupc. *• 
In keeping time the accent is always strongest with the down l^rau 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



DFRECTIONS FOR BEATING TIME 

P. How miist I beat timel 

T. !n the first two moods of common time, for the first beat, lightly strike the cnj 
of your finger on whatever you boat upon; second, bring down the heel of your 
hand ; third, raise your hand a little and shut it partly up; fourth beat, raise it up 
even with your shoulder, and throw it open at the same time, which completes the 
bar. The third and fourth moods, for the first beat let the hand fall ; second, raise it 
up. The first two beats in triple time are the same as in the first of common time ; 
third beat, raise the hand up. Compound time is heat in the same manner as in the 
third of common. 13o careful that the motion of the hand should be always gentle, 
graceful, and regular, and never raise il much above a level with your shoulder. 

CHARACTERS USED IN MUSIC. 



EXAnPLES. 



Ledger line - 



A Stave Lcdget 
line 



-Ledger line 



EXPLANATION. 

Is five parallel lines 

■ with their spaces, on 
. which notes and olhcr 

- musical characters are 
" written, oci ;hs lodger 

line is addtJ -.Then notes 
ascend or dcKcnd be- 
yond the stave. 

Is drawn across the first 
end o*" '^^^c staves, and 
. snown how many parts 

- are sung together. If 
i it include four parts, the 

■ order of them arc as fol- 
lows. The lowest and 

. first part is the bass, the 

- second is tenor, the third 
" counter, and the fourth 
. and upper part is treble ; 

if only three parts, the 
third is treble. 



EXAMPLES 



^ 



A single Xar 



A measure note 



E 



:5=:iK 



izizis: 



JJIZ 



m 



Bars, 



EXPLANATION. 

Is placed on the fourth 

- fine of the stave, and 
I belongs to the bass a» 

- lower part in music ; ii 

- is sometimes used in 
counter. 

Stands on G» second 
line of the tenor or tre- 
ble stave, and crosses 
, that line four times. It 
■ is always used in tenor 
" and treble, and some- 
times in counter. 

- Stands on C, middle 

- line ; is used only in 
'_ counter. 

Is a plain lino or mark 
^ across the stave, and di- 

- vides the time into equal 
" parts according to the 

mood of time and mea 
sure note. 



Is a note that fills a 
measure ; i. e. from one 
bar to another, without 
any other note or rest. 

Any quantity nl music 
written between two o'' 
■ these marks or bars, i» 
called a bar of music 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



Joi. o |joint 
ol edditiun. 



A Flat,' 



A Sharp, 



3=^ 



-t:^ 




Set at the right hanit of I> 
any note, aoas tu n iiaJ 
its length, or nauses it to 
.[- be sou 11 Je J half as long 
again as it woulJ be 
without the dot ; thus, 
a poistcd scinibreve is 
sung as long as three 
minims, &c. 

Set immediately pre- 
ceding or before a note, 
sinks it half a tone; i. e. 
causes it to be sung half 
a lone lower than it 
would be without the 
flat 

Set before a note, raises 
it half n tone; i.e. causes 
it to be sung half a tone 
higher than it would be 
without the sharp. 

' Restores a note from flat 
. or sharp to its natural 
sound. 

Over or under any num- 
ber of notes, shows tl.at 
they must be sung to 
one syllable, gliding soft- 
ly from one sound to the 
other. The tails of the 
notes are often joined 
together, which answers 
the same purpose as a 
slur. 



" We ret 
•tibod tbeiD I 



iigers lu oriiil acciueiiial Hats and sharps, unless they umler- 



Figuro 3, 






Over or under three 
notes, is a mark of dimi- 
nution, and shoi-'s that 
they must be sung in llip 
lime of two of the sunie 
kind wilhout a figure. 



^jqaz^^p- 



■ — Shows that the not« ovri 
311^ which it is placed ihould 
be warbled with a soft 



^: 



'fi 



Appogiatura, or 
grace notes, 



Shows the place of the 
succeeding note on the 
stave. 



Notes thus marked are 
sounded one fourth long- 
er than their usual time- 



Is seldom used in vocal 
music. The notes over 
which il is placed snould 
be sounded distinct and 
emphatical. 

Arc small cjtra notes, 
added and set before o; 
aftej- regular notes, tn 
guide the voice .nor« 
gracefully into the souui) 
of the surceeduig L 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



Mark of acsent I r-^ 
and half accent ' 1 



?^S 



- -^ rfhows ihe place which 
^ is accented in each mea- 

- sure. 

- t Shows the half accent 



m 



Shows the end of a 
strain ; it also shows 
when to repeat. 



Itcpeat 



Figure 1, 2, c 
double ending. 



-P- 



E 



:sr: 






SiE 



- Shows that the tune is 
■ to be sung twice from it 
! to the next double bar or 

- close. 

At the end of a strain, or 
at the end of a tune, 
shows that the note or 
notes under 1 su^c to be 
sung before you repeat, 
and those under 2 after 
omitting those under 1 ; 
but if the notes are tied 
togellicr with a slur, 
both are sung the se- 
cond time, ax in the se- 
cond ciample. 



^^^ 



Shows the end ol a tune 
or anthcin. 



Denotes a repetition oi 
preceding words 



OF CHOOSING NOTES. 

P. What are choosing notes, and how must I sing them 1 

T. They are notes set immediately over each other on the same stave ; either of 
which may be sung, but not by the same voice ; (in bass the lower notes are termed 
ground bass.) If two persons are singing the same part, one may sing the upper 
notes, and the other the lower notes. See the example on the bass stave. 

EXAMPLE OF CHOOSINS NOTES. 




iP^ 



OF SYNCOPATION. 

P. What is meant by syncopation, or syncopated notes t 

T. Syncopation is any number of notes set on the same line or space included by 
a slur; sometimes driven across or through the bar, and sometimes in the middle; 
one of siich notes only are to be named, but sound the time of all the notes, whether 
driven across the bar or not, swelling the voice a little at the usual place of the 
accent. 




^lS?SE^St 



ii THE GAMUT, JK KUDIiMENTS -OF MUSIC 

OF SYNCOPE OR SYNCOPEED NOTES. 11 upon it, as though it were in the usual place of the accent, as in common time 

having half the time of the measure in the middle; as a minim betweiin tw; 
P. What is meant by syncope, or syncopeed notes ! || crotchets, or a crotchet preceding a pointed minim, or a crotchet between two 

T. It is when a note is set out of its usual order, requiring the accent to be || quavers, &c. 

S.TIMFLES OF STSCOPZF.n S0TE9. 



4- 



s:^§?SteW 



+ 



::3zsisz:s:P-P 



_•)- 






=F^ 



isr 



^T^P-P 



^.SEF^S^ 



^^ 



i\^ 



OF TilE KEYS OR KEY NOTES. 

V. What is meant by the keys in music, how many are there, and how are they 
known ! 

T. The key note of every correct piece of music is tlie leading note of the tune, 
by which all the other sounds throughout the tflne arc compared, and is always the 
last note in the bass, ai.d generally in the tenor. If the last note in the bass be faw 
immediately above me, the tune is on a sharji or major key ; but if law immediately 
below me, it is a flat or minor key. 

There are but two natural places for tho keys, A and C. S. is the natural place 
of the flat key, and C the natural place of the sharp key. Without the aid of the 
flats and sharps at the beginning of the stave, no tunc can rightly be set to any other 
than these two natural keys ; but by the help of these, me. the centre, leading and 
govenjng note, and of course the keys, are removed at pleasure, and form what are 
called anilicial keys, producing the same clfect as the two natural keys ; i. e. bv fixing 
the two semi or half tones equally distant from the kcv notes. The diJlerence 
between the major and minor Keys is as follows; tho major key note has its 3d, 6th, 
^wi. 7th intervals, ascending half a tone higher than the same intervals aijcending from 
*he minor key nolo; and llus is the reason some tunes are on a sharp key, and others 
on a flat key This also is the reason why music set to the major or sharp key is 
generally sprightly and cheerful ; whereas music set to the minor or flat key is pen- 
«ive and melancholy. Sharp key luney suit to sing hymns and psain.s of praise and 
'hunksgiving, antl flat key tunes tDose of prayer and &up[>lic^tion 



OF TONES AND SE-MITONES. 

P What is meant by tones and semi or half tones \ 

T. There are said to be but seven sounds belonging to every key note in music, 
every eighth being the same, and is called an octave. Therefore these sounds are 
represented by only seven letters. These sounds in music are called tones ; five of 
them are called whole tones, and two of them semitones or halftones. The natural 
places for the semitones are between B and C, and between E and F, and they are 
always between me and faw, and law and faw, find them where you may. 

P, Arc the semitones always between the same letters in every tune ? 

T. No ; although the natural situation of semitones arc between B C and E F 
yet their situations, as well as the two keys, are verj- often altered by flats and sharps 
set at the beginning of the tune. You therefore remember that the natural place for 
the me is on B, but if B be flat, me is on E, &c. ; and if F be shaqi, me Ls on F, &c. 
Of course, if the me is removed, the semitones are as the semitonoi are always, 
between me and faw, and law and faw. 

P. Well, my good teacher, I am very much obliged to you for this explanation 
for I have studied a great deal about them, but it is now [ilain to me. 

T Well, my studious pupil, as yoii understand these rules prettv well, voa •» 
now i)roc«^J to sia^cp 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 
OF soujS'ding the eight notes. 

/*. Please fell mo how to sound the eight notes, and where I must commence ? 



7". Commence first on faw, the major or sharp key note on the tenor and treble 
stave; thsn ascend softly from one sound to another till you sing the eighth note on 



tne fifth line, which is an octave ; thch descend, fallmg sofllj from Jne sound to luo 
other till you end at the close. Then commence on law, the minor or flat key note . 
ascend and descend in the same manner till you come to the close. Uv this you 
learn the difTercnco helwecn the major and minor moods or keys. 

After having sounded the eight notes several times, you may go on to s'lg tha 
other lessons for tuning the voice, and then some plain tunes. 



Eight notes. 



MAJOR KEY. 



LESSONS FOR TUNING THE VOICE. 

Common Time. Eight Noted. 



MINOR KEY. 




.fi^ftp^^gigigyi 



:^_^± 



£ 



^^ 



Triple Time, M^or Key. 



^' 



F1 



ffT^ 



E 



EEFf 



EeS 



m.. 



=^^3 



■^ 



ijsi; 



--©- 



^^^^Ss 



ee9 



-E3 *-t^- 
4-+ ++ ++ + + ++ +l_+t +' +T +?. +f +1 + \ +} +T +» +f + 



iiil^i Siggie »gg|ff^ 



I + f + f 




|g^i? ^gg|^^L^i^^P ii^ ^^feE£ ^Pr 



THE GAMUT OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 
+ + + + -f- 



r-^e^ 



£EEE 



'■^^ 



-P— F- 



1 r 



S 



P-^- 



HZI 



■f- 4- -r I *- t + f 



+ I 



+ I 



P 



a^ 



+ » 



+ I 



+ + 



i&tP- 



I I r 



-Oii r- ir- j:,. ■ . 



1^^ 



i^ 



+ » 



iEE^^t^ 



+ 



+ + 



^ 



-p-p- 



+ + + + ++ + + 



+ 



:f=P~£=: 



+ 









s^^eP^^^^ 



H— -p- 

f!?? ^1 ' 



+ + 



^ 



+ + + + 



? 



+ .. + +. + .» + t + f + ? + t + I + »++ + + + + 



^gg^g^^^^gJi^ ^^ F ^ii S^i^Biia gl 




INTERVALS 






NOJ'B. i- suiriila iivmt ido uuua) iil(u-<i of flic acceul, aQ(i I o^or Uw half acccnc / 



THE GAMUT, OH RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



x\ 



PART SECOND. 

INTRODUCTION TO THE GENERAL SCALE, AND RULES FOR 
PITCHING OR KEYING MUSIC. 

TuE following 13 a representation of the general scale, showing the connexion of 
the parts, and also what sound of the general scale each letter, line, or space in either 
of the octaves represents : for instance, A the minor key, occupies the 2d, 9lh, and 
16th sounds of the general scale: C, the natural major key, the 4th, llth, and 18th. 
Thus, it will appear that every octave being unison, are considered one and the same 
Eounil. Although the last in the bass is the key note, and in case the me ia not 



transposed, will either be on the 2d and ■Ith degrees as above stated, vet with the 
same propriety we may suppose them on the 9th, lllh. &c. degrees; for when wo 
refer to a pitchjiipe for the sound of either of the foregoing keys, if it be j roprrly 
constructed, it will exactly correspond to the 9th. llth, &c, sounds of the general 
scale. Then by descending the octave, we get ttie sound of the natural key ; then 
by ascending a 3d, 'Uh, or .5th, as the tune may require, we readily discover whether 
the piece be properly keyed. If we find, after descending the octave, we can ascend 
to the highest note in the tenor or treble, and can pronounce them with ease and 
freedom, the piece may be said tci tie properly keyed ; but if, on the contrary, after 
descending, we find it difficult to ascend as above, the piece is improperly keyed, 
and should be set lower. 

NoTK. — This method of proving the keys is infallible to individuals, and will hold 
good in choirs, when we suppose the teacher or leader capable of judging for the 
commonality of voices. 



space above 

fifth line F. 

fourth space E* 
-fourth line D 



m- 



-third line 





space above 

fifth line A- 

fourth space G 

fourth line F- 

third space E 



first line of Tenor Stave - 



Natural key of the Major mode law 



second space 
-second hne — B*- 

A first space Nulurnl key of the Minor made law 

fi first hne 01 ttie Dajis .Slave- m^ 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIL". 



'ITie foregoing scale compnses tnrec octaves, of twenty-two sounds. 

p I <• Cgl' "^'■■'^ °° ^^^ fourth line in the dass, shows that tliat line is the 7th 
• .., - jj^jj jj j^ ^[Jg general scale. 

used on the second line in the tenor and treble, shows that that line, 

lQ[ in the tenor, is the eighth sound in the general scale, and in the trc- 

Thcficlcf, J^ ble, (when performed by a female voice,) the fifteenth sound; for if 

Xyf. the treble, as well as the tenor, were performed entirely by men, the 

" general scale would comprise only fifteen sounds : hence, the treble 

fltavc is only raised an octave above that of tenor, in (»nsequeiirc that female voices 

»ro naturally an octave above men's, and to females the treble is usually assigne<^. 

The stars (') show the natural places of the semitonen. 



When the C chf 



]- is used, (though it has now become very common to write 
counter on cither the G or F clefs,) the middle line in the 
counter is in uniscu with the third space in tenor, (C,) and 
a seventh above the middle line in the bass, &;c. 



Three octaves being more than any common voice can perform, the bass is 
assigned to the gravest of men's voices, the tenor to the higbost of men's, and the 
treble to the female voices : the counter (when used) to boys, and the gravest of the 
female voices. 

Two sounds equally high, or equally low, however unequal in their force, arc said 
to be in unison, one with the other. Coiisequently, E on the lower line in the treble 
stave, is in unison with E on the fourth sjiace in the tenor ; and E on the third space 
in bass, is in unison with E on the first line of the tenor, and an octave below E, the 
lower line in the treble. CC? See the General Scale. From any one letter in the 
general scale, to another of the same name, the interval is an octave — as from B to 
0, D to D, &c. 

Agrocably to the F and G clefs used in the general scale, a note on any line or 

•ipace in the bass, is a sixth below a note on a corresponding line or space in the 

■Vtnor, and a thirteenth below a note in the treble occupying the same line or space, 

wien the "jcble is performed by females.) Q^" Sec the Gc::;ia1 Scale. Suppose vie 



place a note on D, nnddlc line uf the oass, another on IJ, the middle line or the tsnc 
or treble, the interval will ap[iear as just stated ; and to find any otlier mterfal, count 
either ascending or descending, f.s the case may be. 



EXAMPLE. 




2d. Unison. Odaxe. Double Oct 



In counting intervals, remember to include both notes or letters — thus, in counting 
a siith in the above example, D is one, E is two, F is three, G is four, A five, and 
B sii. , 

In the above example, the notes in the treble and air arc placed in Unison with 
each other. But assigning the treble to female voices, and the air to men's voices, 
(as is customary,) an octave must be added to the notes in the treble, (as previously 
observed of a woman's voice being an octave more acute than a man's,) the interval 
then being the "Dass and treble— in the first bar, would be a fifteenth or double octave , 
in the third bar, the note on B in the treble, a thirteenth above D in the bass, &c 
Observe that an octave and a second make a ninth ; an octave and a third make 8 
tenth ; an octave and a fourth make an eleventh ; an octave and a fifth make h 
twelfth; an octave and a sixth, a thirteenth ; an octave and a seventh, a fourttxailh. 
two octaves, a fiftecntli, &c. always including both the first and !aat note. 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMExNTS OF MUSIC 



Xoles O i« alt. 



Wh£ii a loJgcr line \a ailJeJ to a trcWo slave, a note I 



uccupying it U said to be in aJl ; and when the notcaH jiaaa. 
descend below the bass stave, they ore termed doubles. 



UmibteT^ F. DaubU ^E.\ 



TEUMS UY WHICH THE DIFFERENT INTERVALS IN THE GAMUT 
ARE DENOMINATED. 



1. An interval composed of a tone and a semitone," 
u from B to D, id called a minor third. j 



£ 



3. An interval composed of two full tones, &a from " 
Ikw to law, is called a third major. j 



3. An mterval com[ioscd of two full tones and a VI _ 
•erailone, as from me to law ; i. e. from 1! to E, is //r" 
called a fourth. \^^ 



4 An interval composci! of turee full tones, as 
from faw lo me, i. e. IVom F to D, if tailed a Iriton, #^, 
or founl redundant 
2 



1^ 



5. An interval composed of three tones and a scmi- ^ 
tone, as from faw to sol, i, e. from U to G, or from j 
O to D, is called a fifth. | 



^^^1 



6. An interval composed of three to;ics and two 
semitones, as from law to faw, i. e. from E 
called a sixth minor. 



"'■'■i=s^s 



7. An interval composed of four tones and a serai- V 
tone, as from faw to law, i. e. from lo A, is called S^^ — ^ 
a siith major. yw) | 



1^ 



8. An interval composed of four tones and two r^_ 
semitones, as from sol to faw, i. c. from D to C, is V^' 
called a 7ih minor. [See next example.] 



:rt 



9. An interva. composed of five tones and a semi- A/ZTt. 
tone, as from faw to me, i. c. from U to U, is called a ftV— ^■ 
seventh major. \Sv 



10. An interval composed of five tonc3 and two f^.' 
iniitones, is called an octave, (as has already been ^*^ 



observed.) (Jj" See examples of lite three last men- 
tioned intervals. 




The preceding intervals are counted ascemling, or upwards, and the sharps ■'# 
indicate the places and number of the semitones in eaca. 

rioTs. — The Bciritoacs always iie Dctween me inn taw ana law atid ft'' 



TilL GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSl-J 



OF HARMONY AND COMPOSITION 

Haling given an explanation of the JiiTercni inccrvais coniaineJ in the octave, and 
Lte njannci •»! which the parts of music are connected, I proceed to show how they 
may be 'iscd in composition to piMduce liarmony. 

Harmony consists in tlie proportion of the distance of two, three, or four sounds, 
perfonned at the same time, and mingling in a most pleasing manner to the ear. 

The notes which produce harmony, when sounded togethei, are called concords, 
ind their intervals, consonant intervals. The notes which, when sounded together, 
produce a disagreeable sound to the car, are called diacords, and their intervals, dis- 
sonant intcrrnh. There aire but four concords in music — viz. : unison, third, fifth, and 
sicth ; (theii eighths or octaves are also meant.) The unison is called a jicrfcct chord, 
and commonly the fifth is so called ; if the composer please, however, he may make 
the fifth imperfect, when composing more than two parts. The third and sixth are 
called im|>erfect, their chords being not so full, nor so agreeable to the ear, as the per- 
fect : but in four parts the sixth is often used instead of the fifth so in effect there 
are bit three concords, employed together, in composition. 

N B. The meaning of imperfect, signifies that it wants a semitone of its perfec- 
tions, to what it does when it is perfect : for as the lesser or imperfect third includes 
hut three half tones, the greater or major third includes four, &c. The discords are 
a second, a fourth, a seventh, and their octaves; though the greater fourth sometimes 
"■omcs very near to the sound of an imperfect chord, it being the same in ratio as the 
minor fifth. Indeed some composers (the writer of these extracts is one of them) 
socm very partial to the gre.iter fourth, and frequently admit it in composition. The 
following is an example of tlie several concords and discords, and their octaves under 
tl'cm : 



coxcouns. 



Single C'hord-^ 
TJuir Octaves. < 



I 


3 


5 


6 


2 


4 


7 


8 


10 


12 


13 


9 


11 


14 


15 


17 


19 


20 


16 


19 


21 

28 j 


22 


24 


26 


27 


a3 


25 



Notwithstandmg the 2d, 4th, 7to, &c, are properly discords, yet a skilful compose; 
may use them to some advantage, provided a full chord of all the parts immediately 
follow : they will then answer a similar purpose to acid, which being tasted immedi- 
ately previous to sweet gives the latter a more pleasing flavour. Although ihe 4th is 
really a discord, yet it is very often used in composition. The rough sound of the 
4th may be so mollified by the sweetness of the 5th and 8th as to harmonize almost as 
well as any three sounds in nature ; and it would be reasonable to suppose that where 
we have two perfect chords, a discord may he introduced with very little violation to 
the laws of harmony ; hut as it is the most dilhcult part of composition to use a discord 
in such a manner and place as to show more fully the power and beauty of music, 
we think composers should only use them sparingly, (as it is much better to have all 
sweet than to have too much sour or bitter,) and always let them be followeii by a 
jierfcct chord. 

ON THE TRANSPOSITION OF KEYS. 

The reason why the two natural keys are transposed by flats and sharps at the he- 
ginning of the stave, is to bring them within the stave, and to bring the music within 
the compass of the voice. The key notes or places of the keys are always found ir 
the last note of the bass of a correct tune, and is either faw immediately above me 
the sliarp key — or law immediately helow me the flat key. The reason why one tur.c 
is on a sharp, lively key, and another en a flat, melancholy key, is, that every third, 
sixth and seventh, ascending from the sharp key, are ualf a tone higher than the same 
intervals ascending from the flat key note. For instance, a third ascending from the 
sharp key note faw, (licing a major thinl,) is very different from a third ascending 
from law the flat key note, (a minor third,) and so of other intervals. Any person 
may lie convinced of this by hearing a tune sung first in a Hat and afterwards in a 
sharp key ; when if the parts are correctly carried on, the choids will be entirely 
changed, and the tune as first sung, will scarcely be recognised or thought to be itio 
same; we will give one example. Let Windham tune be sung on its proper flat key, 
and then on a sharp key, and the intervals will be entirely changed, and so with any 
other tunc. (See tlie example.) 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



EXAMPLE , 
WINDHAM— on the flat key law, its proper key. 



'jgj^^^l^E^fe^^FE^bEEEF^fr 



t 



^^fe^l 



fel^^S^feS^^^g 



::sznr 



^ 



HwsizEt£fcEi 



m 



l^D^g ^Eg^-^^fF^g g|^ ^£^^^fe p^ 



-5^-=; 3 



FF^Hf 



jEis: 



grcr.-ji: 



WINBHAM— on the sharp key faw. 



-p- 



22 



jOTT 



» * P 



^^^^^^^S 



-b^ 



EffipEi 



]SZ 



^^PSeTEE^^^^ 



E^S 



:p: 



£ 



^-^^iF^ 



— t^ 



3^ 



=P=^ 



p— — i^ -f=-fc: -.^z—t 



'Ps-r r 



:q:^ 



FFp 



S^^^ 



^^^S^^^_^^ 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



EXAMPLES OF THE KEYS. 



Major Key. Minor Key. 




In iho Major key, from law to faw, its third, the 
interval is two tones, [a Major third] — from faw to 
lavf, its sixth, the interval is four tones and a semi- 
i"ne, [a Major sixth] — and from faw to me, its 
seventh, the interval is five tones and a semitone, 
[a Major seventh.] 

In the Minor key, from law to faw, its third, the 
inter\-al is one tone and a semitone, [Minor third] — 
from law to faw, its sixth, the interval is three tones 
and two semitones, [a Minor sixth] and from law 
to sol, its seventh, the interval is four tones and 
two semitones, [a M'Mor seventh.] 



To prove the utility of removing the key, I will produce two examples. First, Let 
the tune " Suffield" be written on key note A, (natural fiat key,) instead of E, its 
proper key — and, besides the inconvenience of multiplying ledger lines, few voices 
would be able to perform it — the treble in particular. 

SUFFIELD — on E, its proper key, from the repeat. 

-h»T ^- '' — ' 



feg^ ^B^ li^gpE^:^ 



lasts 



pi^^s 



ESE^^^zg^g^^ 



The same on A, the as.<:iunc<I, or natural key \. 



;i£feEg;p^^^pEFE^ 




Bl 1 "-^ 






Second, Let " Comphiner" be written on key note C, (natural sharp key,) instead 
of G, its proper key, and there are but few that could perform it, — the tonor in 

particubr. 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 

COMPLAINEU — on G, its proper key, from the repeat 



-P- 



z^ pzgEg=|izp-{3-^-:|=p-££g 



:P— I 



zzzizpi^ 



S 






.7-^ 



^-9- 



g p|g^P3^=#;N£^g^p£^ 



'I if >- 



1 ©:-#- 



^EEE 



:Pz 



.zing; 



E 



-P- 



-P-ffiJX 



Tho Biune on the assumed, or natural key C. 



^ gr^f- | -[ iEziE=^^rf--^^f;^^ 



_©_© o 



O "P" «_» "P 



E 



i 



^^^ 



^ 



?cia 



-^©_ 



gj;-^ 



_2_ 



o'^ 



(g^-. ^r-^-R 



±^=E: 



:^J!iii 



P— o- 



'^^ 



H-a— r-p^t^ 



£^^-^^3LzEpj 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



The me, anil consequently the keys, is removea cither by sharping its fifth or 
■latting its fourth thus ■ 

■]. A fiftli h-om B me, Its natural place, will bring us to F 

2. A fifth from F me, will bring us to C 

3. A fifth from C me, will bring us to G 

5J-' 4. A fifth from G me, will bring us to D 

T>. A fifth from D me, will bring us to A 

>< 6. A fifth from A me, will bring us to E 

7. A fifth from E me, will bring us back to B 



'1. A fourth from B me, will bring us 

2. A fourth from E me, will bring us 

3. A fourth from A me, will bring us 

4. A fourth from D me, will bring us 

5. A fourth from (J me, will bring us 

6. A fourth from C nie, will bring us 
Jl. A fourth from F ir.e, will bring us home to 11 



This accounts for the customary rules ol transposition. Tit 

The natural place for me is , H 

If B is 1>, me is on E 

If B and E is b, me is on A 

If B, E, and A is I), me is on D 

If B, E, A, and D is 1), mc is on (I 

If B, E, A, D, and G is I), me is on C 

If B, E, A, D, G, and C is b, me is on F 

If F be S, mo is on i 

IfF and be S, me is on 

If F, C, and G be #, me is on G 

If F, C, G, and D be #, mo is on U 

IfF, C, G, D, and A is #, me is on A 

If F, C, G, D, A, and E is #, me is on E 

" By flats the me is driven round. 

Till forced on B to stand its ground ; 

By sharps the me's led through the keys, 

Till brought to U its native place." 



A SCALE, SHOWING THE SITIJATIOX OF BOTH KEYS IN EVERV TRANSPOSITION OF THE ME BY SHARPS AND FLATS. 

lUIKUn KETS BT SHAHPS, 



MAJon KETS BT SUAUl-S. 




MlJOn KETS BT FLATS. 




Key note. 



B F C 



Natural place. 




it^B- 



MIJrOK KETS BI VLATS. 



Key note. 







THE GAMUT OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. x 

A SCALE. SHOWINO THK SITUATION OF THE SKMITONF.S IN EVEUV TKAN8P0S1TI0N OF 'I'HE MK m FLATS ANIJ SHAKI'.S 



Natural (ilacc of the Semitones. 



RY FLATS 







G A. CD. 



Natural place of the Seinitonea. 



BT SDiinPS. 




Observe that, by six flats or six shaqie, (incIuJing the natural place,) both of 
the kc)'5 are pincej on every letter in the stave, anJ by the same number of either 
character, (Incluiiinj; the natural place,) the whole octave is dividej into semitones ; 
and it is impossible to use another flat or sharp in transposition, for seven flats or 
sharps would only put thorn in their natural places. You may also observe, that one 
.lat, or six sharjis, places the keys and semitones precisely in the same situation ; and 
that one snarp, or six flats, has the same eflcct, and two flats or five sharps, and two 
sharps or five flats, &c. ; and with six flats, or one sharp, one of the semitones is m 
Us natural [ilacc ; i. e. between B and C. Also with six sharps, or one flat, one of the 
semitones is in its natural place, i. e. between E and F, as the natural places of the 
seinitorjea are between U and C, and E and F ; and we suppose the reason why 
lioth of these characters are used in tra^isposing music, is to save the trouble and 
time uf making so many of cither character; for a person can make one flat much 
quicker than six sharps, or one sharp ipin ker than six flats, &c. 

Thus I think I have showed satisfactonly how tlie keys are removed, and how the 
octave is divided into aeniitone? ov flats arm snnrps, and why both characters are 
■mkI ui ti-ansuofitinfj 



C 8th or 1st [^ 3d 



rth O 2J 




O 2d 



A G 1st 



SCALE OF KEYS 

The figures at the left hand of the column of notes shows the 
degrees of the shnrp key. those at the ri'^ht hand show the de- 
grees of the tlat Key. This s^alc shows that the O is between 
the two keys, and that the first i!i»f 'ce of the sharp key is the 
first note above the O, and that the f.rst Jearee of the fiat key is 
the first note below the O 

Every sharp key has its relative flat key a to'rd below ; an<l 
every flat key has its relative sharj) key a third above 

These admit of an easy and natural transition from one to the 

Every sh-rp at the beginning of a tune Lakes the place of /nc, 
the fourth <le^ree from the sharp key. and raises that note half o 
tone, and rc.mo'f^ •'ii" rnc and the key to the filth above .^ lo 
the fourth lielow 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSI 



Ever; fiat at ihc twinning of a tune lakes the place of the me, sinks that note 
asXi a tone, and removes the me and the key to the fourth above, or to the fifth 
below. 

The seven soundo have also distinct names from their situation and eflcct in the 
■«lo. The key no*.e is called the tonic; the next above, or its second, the super- 
^nic — its third, the mediant — its fourth, the subdominant — its fiflh, the dominant — 
Its sixth, the eubmedi'Uit — its seventh, the leading note. 

Tonic. 















o -^ 


r^' 






^ 


c> 






i;^. 


. 


u 


•— ' 








ii. 





























Tonic- Superton 



McdiaDi. SubdominanL Dominant. Submedianl. L. note. 



The tot jc b so called from its being the principal or pitch of the tune. 

The supertonic is so called from its being the note above the tonic. 

The rnaliant is so called from its being in the middle way between the tonic 
and dominant 

The subdominant is so called from its being the fiflh below the tonic, as the 
dominant is the fifth above. 

The dominant is so called from its being a principal note, and requires the tonic 
generally to be heard after it, especially at a close, and is therefore said to govern iU 

The submediant is so called from its being in the middle way between the tonic 
and its fifth below. 

The leading note is so called from its leading to the tonic, and is the sharp seventh 
of the scale, and therefore in the minor mode is necessarily sharpened in ascending. 

There are also fourteen intervals in the scale bearing distinct name=. viz. ; Unison, 
Minor second. Major second. Minor third. Major third, I'erfect fifth, Minor sixth. 
Major sixth, Minor seventh, .Major seventh. Octave. 



Imperfect I Imrerfecl 



S3 



^ 



fi: 



B 



HaloilL Perfect 5th. BlinorGih. Major Gth. 



*lh. major "ih. Ocuve S. 



As the scale admits of only twelve semitones, so an octave although by counting 
the first and last note, which are octaves to each other, and really one and the same 
sound in effect ; it contains thirteen sounds, yet it has but twelve intervals, because the 
unison cannot properly be called an interval; and the sharp fourth and flat fifth, 
although necessarily distinguished in harmony, are performed on keyed instrumentp 
with the same keys, and make but one inter^-al. 



ON THE MODULATION OF KEY. 

The modulation or changing of the key note from one letter or given tone to 
another, being so frequent in every regular composition, particularly Anthems, that 
the performers will be very often embarrassed, unless tliey endeavour to acquire a 
knowledge or habit of discerning those changes. 

The transition from one K-ltcr or key is sometimes efTected by gradual preparation, 
as by accidental fiats, sharps, or naturals. When the change is gradual, the new 
key is announced by flats, sharps, or naturals. When the change is sudden, the 
usual signs or signature at the beginning of the stave are either altered or removed 
as in the tune called the Christian's Song, or the Judgment Anthem. 



THE GAMUT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



KXAMPLE . 
TRANSITION IN THE MAJOR MODE FROM ONE KEY OR LETTER 10 ANOTHER. 
Key of C, into G, by a sharp on F. Key of G, into D, by an additional sharp on 

-# r ^- 



;^^3Esa 



~n rr 






Or faw me 



P^- 



fe?E 



T21 



"4- 



-p— p- 



faw 



-#- 



EEi 



=&=t:^ 



Or faw mc faw 



Key of C, into F, by ajlai on B. 



Or faw 



i 



^-1 ,^ ^4:5=3 :^^ 



-F=bi 



Key of F, into C, by a natural on B. 



P^?=.^J^^P ^^^^f#g^SEj^ ^^^i 



Or 60I faw law law 



Or law faw me faw 



^ 



ip: 



^ 



__\ .^_ 



i^^ 



J2. 



-^-pj-K^ 



-£r_ 



i 



j^ 



Or faw sol faw Or me faw sol faw 

TRANSITION IN THE MINOR MODE, FROM ONE KEY OR LETTER TO ANOTHER. 

Key of £,', into B, by an additional sharp mi C, 



Key of A, into E, by one sharp. 



FEEg^ 



^ 



ZT 



-^ 



Or faw me 



^ 



-+-?: 



=3= 



^EE3=E 



Or faw me 

f- ' p- 



Or \v9/ i»vt 



Or i»w iBw 



THE GA.MIJT. OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIt' 

Kcji of D, into A, by a natural on li 



-F- 



'-^^^ 



Or faw me 



i^^^ 
\~~---~_ 



i:=£=E FT-F 



^^k 



Major Key of C, into the miuor of A 



Or law law 

Minor Key of A, into the major of C, 



— 5=P: 



'M 



t : 



:iizs: 



-F 



S=&: 



="P 



^ 



i 



Key of D mejor, into ti minor 



1^ 



?■ 



— IJIZt 



^ztox 



r#- 



Key of B minor, into D major. 



--^^^T^ 



-!^ — rr 



11 



h3ii^=; 



^- 



£3 



S 



t3EE 



:Ei 



3X 



Sf 



Siiddcn change from C major, to C minor. 



m—< 



is: 



:E?=tkhzz:gi=7_^^ 



^=P^i=Oi 



i 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC 



To aid thone who wish further information with respect to the best method of mo- 
dulation by retaining the sol fawing system, the following observations arc added. 

In order to do this, the syllables niust follow into the new key and take the same* 
place there which they held in the original key ; i. e. faw must be the new key pote, 
sol its dominant or fifth, and me its leading note, if changing from the minor to the 
major mode or key. If changing from major to minor, law must be the new key, and 
law mediant to the major key its dominant, and rfle also its leading note. 

There are four different pitches which the composer may consistently change to 
form any given pitch ; viz. the fifth of the givpn pitch may be changed to the key 
note by adding such llats, sharps, or naturals, as will place the semitones in tlieir re- 
gular degrees in the diatonic scale, (the scale in common use,) to the fourth, observing 
the same order of semitones, or to the sixth, its relative minor key, or change itself 
into a minor key if previously major, (see the example,) from C major to C minor. 
In order to modulate into the fourth of the key, the major 7th is made flat. For ex- 
ample, in the key of C major, by flatting B, F becomes the key note. To apply the 
syllables in this case, let C immediately preceding the tbit be called sol, preserving 
the tone of faw, its former name, then by falling a whole tone to B, calling it faw, 
vou come into the key of F. In modulating into the fifth of the key, the fourth is 
made sharp, and becomes the leading note or sharp seventh of the new key. Kiam- 
ple : — In the key of C major by sharping F you make G tlie key note. In order To 
apply the syllables in this ease, let G immediately preceding the sharp be called faw, 
preserving the tone which it held as sol, then by falling half a tone, and calling F me, 
you arrive at the key of G. 

Tliis is the method most common to be used in psalmody in modulating from one 
bey to another. 

Having gone thus far with our subject, we feel willing to close by making a few 
■ibservations on the ornamental part of singing, or what are generally termed graces. 
I'his if the name generally given to those occasional embellishments which a perfor- 
mer or ctjm[ioser introduces to heighten the elfect of a com]»>sition. It consists not only 
n giving due jilace to the apogialura turn, shalte, or trill, and other decorative ail- 
.litions, but in that easy, smooth, and natural expression ol the passages which heM. 
conveys the native Iieauties and elegancies of the ccmposition, and forms one of the 
fiist attributes of a cultivated and lefined performer 

A person or persons may be well acquainted with all the various characters in psal- 
mody, (or music;) they may also be able to sing their part in true time, ami yet their 
pejformanct be tar fron; pleasing; if it is d'-void of necessary cmbellishmenLs, their 
tnanner and bad expression may conspire to render it disagreeable. A few plain hints, 
and also a tew general and friendiv observe.tions we ''fine will tei.d to correct these 
v^"fs 'n ura'':is;.'nr of vr.eai music. 



GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 

1. Cakk should lie taken that all the parts (when singing together) begin upon 
their proper pitch. If they are too high, difficulty and perhaps discords will be the 
consequence ; if too low, duhiess and languor. If the parts are not united by their 
corresponding degrees, the whole piece may be run into confusion and jargon before it 
ends ; and perhaps the whole occasioned by an error in the pitch of one or more of the 
parts of only one semitone. 

2. It is by no means necessary to constitute good singers that they should sing very 
loud. Each one should sing so soft as not to drown the teacher's voice, and each part 
so soft as will admit the otlier parts to be distinctly heard. If the teacher's voice cannot 
be heard it cannot be imitated, (as that is the best way to modulate the voice and 
make it harmonious,) and if the singers of any one are so loud that they cannot hear 
the other parts because of their own noise, the parts are surely not rightly proportioned, 
and o.ight to be altered. 

3 When singing in concert the bass should be sounded full, bold, and majestic 
bu. not harsh ; the tenor regular, firm, and distinct ; the counter clear and plain, and 
t.te treble soft and mild, but not faint. The tenor and treble may consider the German 
fiute ; the sound of which taey may endeavour to imitate, if they wish to improve the 
voice. 

4. Flat keyed tunes should be sung softer than sharp keyed ones, and may be pro- 
portioneil with a lighter bass ; but for sharp keyed tunes let the bass be full and strong, 
but never harsh. 

5. The high notes, quick notes, and slurred notes, of each part, should be sung softer 
than the low notes, long notes, and single notes, of the same parts. All the notes 
included by one slur should be sung at one breath if possible. 

G. Learners should sing all jiarts of music somewhat softer than their leaders do, as it 
tends to cultivate the voice and give them an opportunity of following in a piece with 
which they are not well acquainted ; but a good voice may be soon much injured by 
singing too loud. 

7. When notes of the tenor fall below those of the bass, the tenor should be sounded 
strong, and the bass soft, 

8. While first learning a tune it may be sung somewhat slower than the true time 
or mood of time requires, until the notes can be named and truly sounded without 
looking on the book. 

9. Learners are apt to give the first note where a fuge begins nearly double the 
time it ought to have, sounding a crotchet almost as long as a minim in any other part 
of the tune, which puts the parts in confusion by losing time; whereas the fugcs ough 
to be movHil olf lively, the time decreasing (or the notes sung quicker') ami tlie som>^ 



XXVI!) 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



of the cngagtk' part or parts increasing in sound as the others fall in. All solos or 
fugea shjuld be sung somewhat faster than when all the parts are moving together. 

10. There are but ff w long notes in any tune but what might be swelled with pro- 
pnely. The swell is one ol the greatest ornaments to vocal music if rightly performed. 
All long notes of the bass should be swelled if the other p^^ts are singing short or quick 
notes at the same lime. The swell should be struck plain upon the first part of the 
note, increase to the middle, and then decrease softly like an echo, or die away like 
the sound of a bell. 

11. All notes (except some in syncopation) should be called plain by their proper 
names, and fairly articulated; and in applying the words great care should be taken 
that tliey be properly pronounced and not torn to pieces between the teeth, nor forced 
through the nose. Let llie mouth be freely opened, but not too wide, the teeth a 
little asunder, and let the sound come from the lungs and be entirely formed where 
they should be only distinguished, viz. on the end of the tongue. The superiority of 
vocal to instrumental music, is that while one only pleases the ear, the other informs 
the understanding. 

12. When notes occur one directly above another, (called choosing notes,) and 
there are several singers on the part where tliey are, let two sing the lower note while 
one does the upper note, and in the same proportion to any other number. 

13. Your singers should not join in concert until each class can sing their own part 
correctly. 

14. Learners should beat time by a pendulum, or with their teacher, until they can 
beat regular time, before they attempt to beat and sing both at once, because it per- 
plcses them to beat, name time, and sound the notes at the same time, until they have 
acquired a knowledge of each by itself. 

15. Too long singing at a time injures the lungs.* 

16. Some teachers are in the habit of singing too long at a time with their pupils. 
It is better to sing but only eight or ten tunes at a lesson, or at one time, and inform 
the learners tlie nature of the pieces and tb.e manner in which they should be per^ 
formed, and continue at them until they are understood, than to shun over forty or 
fifty in one evening, and at the end of a quarter of schooling perhaps few beside the 



* A cold or cough, all kind of spirituous liquors, violent exercise, too much biie on the 
stoniach, long fasting, the venis overcharged with impure blood, &c. &c. are destructive 
to the voice of one who is much in the habit of singing. An excessive use of ardent 
spirits will speedily ruin the best voice. A frequent use of some acid drink, such as puri- 
fied cider, vinegar, and water mi.\cd and sweetened a little with honey, or sugar with a 
little black or cayenne pti)per, wine, and loaf sugar, 8:c. if used sparingly, are very 
rtrenKthcnmg tu the lungs 



teacher know a flat keyed tune fn.ra a sharp keyed one, what part of the anthem, Slc 
requires emphasis, or how to give the pitch of any tune which they have Ijeen learning 
unless some one inform them. It is easy to name the notes of o tune, but it requires 
attention and practice to sing them correctly. 

17. Learners should not be confined too long to the parts that suit their voices best, 
but should try occasionally the dificrent parts, as it tends greatly to improve the voice 
and give them a knowledge of the connexion of the parts and of harmony as well as 
meioily.* The gentlemen can change from bass to tenor, or from tenor to bass, and 
the ladies from treble to tenor, iScc. 

18. Learners should imJerstand the tunes well by note before they attempt to sing 
them to verses of poetry. 

19. If different verses are applied to a piece of music while learning, it will give the 
learners a more complete knowledge of the tune than they can have by confining it 
always to the same words. Likewise applying different tunes to the same words will 
have a great tendency to remove the embarrassment created by considering every short 
tunc as a set piece to certain words or hymns. 

20. When the key is transposed, there are flats or sharps placed on the stave, and 
when the mood of lime is clianged, the requisite characters are placed upon tlie 
stave. 

21. There should not be any noise indulged while singing, (except the music,) as it 
destroys entirely the beauty of harmony, and renders the performance very difficult 
(especially to new beginners;) and if it i» designedly promoted is nothing less than a 
proof of disrespect in the singers to the exercise, M themselves who occasion it, and to 
the Author of our existence. 

22. The apogiatura is p-aced in some tunes which may be used with propriety by 
a good voice ; also the trill over some notes ; but neither should be attempted by any 
one until he can perform the tunc well by plain notes, (as they add nothing to the 
time.) Indeed no one can add much to the beauty of a piece by using what are gene- 
rally termed graces, unless they are in a manner natural to theii voice. 

23. W'hen learning to sing, we should endeavour to cultivate the voice so as to 
make it soft, smooth, and round, so that when numbers ore performing in concert, 
there may on eaci. part (as near as possible) appear to be but one uniform voire. 
Then, instead of confused jargon, it will be more like the smootli vibraL'ons of the vio- 
lin, or the soft breathings of the German ilutc. Yet how hard it is to make some lie- 



• Melody is the agreeable effect which arises Irom the performance ol a smf'.e part of 
music only. Harmony is the pleasing union of several soimds, or the pcrformaoce ol tri» 
several parts of music toeelber. 



THE GAMUT, OR RUDIMENTS OF MUSI-.: 



S.X1X 



iieve soft singing is the most melodious, whet; at the same time kuJ singing is more 
lilcc the hootings of the midnight bird than refined music. 

21. The must important ornament in singing is strict decorum, with a heart deeply 
impressed with the great truth we utter while einging ihc lines, aiming at the glory 
of God and the edification of one another. 

25. All affectation should be banished, for it is disgusting in the performance of 
sacred music, and contrary to that solemnity which should accompany an exercise so 
near akin to that which will through all eternity engage the attention of those who 
walk in climes of bliss. 

26. The nearest perfection in singing we arrive at, is to pronounce the words* and 



• In singing there are a few words which should vary a little from common pronuncia- 
'.ion, such as end in i and y ; and these should vary two ways. The following method has 
seen generally recommended: In singing it is right to pronounce majesty, mighty, lofty, 
tf somtthine liicc raajcstce, mightce, loiree, &c. i but .lie sense of some other words will 



make the sounds as feeling as if tlie sentiments and sounds were oar own. If eini'cm 
when performing a piece of music could be as much captivated with the wo-ds and 
sounds as the author of the music is when composing it, the foregoing directions would 
be almost useless ; they would pronounce, accent, swell, sing loud and soft where the 
words require it, make suitable gest-urcs, and add every oth(!V necessary grace. 

27. The great Jehovah, who implanted in our nature the noble faculty of vocal per- 
formance, is jealous of the use to which we apply our talents in that particular, lest w* 
use them in a way which docs not tend to glorify his name. Wo should therefore 
endeavour to improve the talent given us, and try to sing with the spirit and with the 
understanding, making melody in our hearts to the Lord. 



be destroyed by this modeof expressing them; such as sanctify, justify, glorify, &c. These 
should partake of the vowel O, rather than KE, and be sounded somewhat like sanctifay, 
justifay, glorifay, &c. It would indeed be dilUcult to describe this exactly j however, tho 
extreme should be avuiiled on both tides. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, 

FKOM THE COLUMlilAN HARMONY. 



There is a charm, a (Owor, that sways thy breast, 
liiiin every piissioa revtl nr be still ; 
Insf'ire^ with rage, or all your cares dissolves ; 
UaQ scwulie (lifitraction, jiiid almost despair ; 
That power Ifl music. 
■ AnnsCrong, 

I'M gre.ll is the empire of music over all the faculties of human nature, and so loud 
nave been the ingenious in celebrating its power and praises, that they have left 
nothing in heaven, not at all in the air, sea, or on the earth, but what in excess of fancy 
01 lerit they have fubjecteJ to its dominion for the better. Its harmony ravishes the 
so- 1 and --.arries it beyond itself; helps, elevates, and extends it. It e-tterininatcs fear 
an, ury, ubates rrucl'y, alleviates sorrow and heaviness, and utterly destroys spleen 
diK .aired. In short, music cures disease, sweetens the labourer's toil, ard adds new 
"ou.age to the soldier. 

Uivi.'H! inu!=ic must be nlloweii by all who practise it to bo ail emanation from the 



Deity ; it is admirably calculated to raise the mind above the sublunary enjoyments of 
this life, in gratitude to our beneficent Benefactor and (Creator. When I consider 
upon the divine nature and power of music on the affections, I am wrapped up in 
admiration, love, and praise, and cannot but adore the Almighty Giver of so goodjjind 
glorious a gift ; and that it has jdeased him to bestow upon mc and my fellow beings 
faculties to sing his praise. It is in the performance of sacred music that we assimilate 
ourselves to theangelic choirs of glory, more nearly than inanv other employment upon 
eartli besides. Most of the arts and employments of this life will accompany us no 
farther than the grave; but this will continue an em]iloyment with the redeemed of 
God while eternal ages roll. It had its ori.gin in God, anil from God it was communi- 
cated to angels and men. Long before this world's foundations were laid, angels and 
archangels sang their grateful praises to tho eternal .lehovah, encircling his throne 
and infinitely exulting. When God had created this lower world and all its appei> 
dages, tho angelic hosts and seraphim above, like bright morning stars shining with 
the most serene briiliaiicv, sang together: and the arc!..iiigcls, tho chiel iiiorubim »' 



INTltODUCTOllY REMARKS 



iipavoi., anj Rons of fiod, shjuteJ for joy, to behold the new crestion so well accom- 
I'lishcd. 

Since then the cherubim and seraphim of heaven sing their ceaseless lays to the'r 
tireator, and consider music a£ one of the most noble and grand vehicles for conveying 
their love 'o him, shall mun. moTtal man, presume to look with haughty scorn, deri- 
sion, and contempt upon that ncience which dignifies those exalted beings above 1 
Ungrateful to God, and unmini'.ful of his transcendent privilege, must he be that is 
possessed of the voice of melody, who delights not to celebrate tlie praises of the Most 
High, by singing hymns and antliems to his name. When amazing pity had seized 
the compassionate breast of our Redeemer ; when it had prevailed upon him to resign 
his royal diadem of glory and robes of light into the hands of his eternal Father, with 
filial submission and humility ; when he condescended to leave the throngs of adoring 
angels who cluster around the throne of God; and when he voluntarily left the 
realms of bliss that he might veil his divinity in humble clay, and become the sufferer 
for all sin against an incensed God, to appease his flaming wrath for a wretched world 
of men ; I say well might shining legions of angels descend through the portals of 
the skies at his nativity, at so amazing condescension, and proclaim the j'lyful news 
to man, that a God on earth was born, and sing while hovering over the Redeemer's 
humble manger, and around the vigilant shepherd, " Glory to God in the highest, 
peace on earlh, and good will towards men." Ijefore his unyiaralleled sufferings, ivhilc 
in humWc sl?le, he rode upon the foal of an ass towards Jerusalem, well might his 
followers strew the way with their clothes and branches of palm trees, and shout, 
" Hosanna ! blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord ! Hosanna in the 
highest !" After he had administcrcil his n)cmorablc supper to his disciples he sang 
v/iththem a hymn, as the last consolation to them till he should have passed through 
the gloomy vale of death and all its horrors. 

Soon after his agoni/.ing p.assion, while the infernal powers roared their Irud ac- 
clamations throU!,h the gloom of hell, and black despair triumphing at the btoody 
horrid dceii, he bicaks the bands of death asunder, and rose triumphant, and was 
escorted by myriads of hymning angels to the bosom of his I'ather Uod. from wnnsr 
patoTinl bands he again received hia diadem of glory and robes of eternal elfulgcace ■ 



there to be our .\dvocate, Mediator, and Redeemer, until ho shall come the second 
time from heaven, not as before in humility, but with all the grandeur of heaven, 
with the shout of the archangel and with the trump of God, to judge the world ; and 
till then, and eternally after, the choirs of glory will ever worship him with songs ol 
endless praises, and sing, " Hallelujah, for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth, and 
he shall reign for ever and ever. King of kings and l^ord of lords ! Hallelujah !" 
" Worthy is the Lamb that was slain," shall the saints of glory for ever sing, " and 
nath redeemed us to God by his blood, to receive power, ami riches, and wisdom, and 
strength, and honour, and glorj', and blessing. Blessing, and honour, glory, and power 
be unto him that silteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever ! 
.\men." No art in nature is better calculated to interest the feelings and command 
the passions of the soul than sacred music when well performed. It raises within the 
soul a kind of seraphic pathos, and almost transports the soul to the paradise of God, 
far, far beyond the contaminations of this gross sphere of nature, to a sphere of elevated 
glory. Were the soul to expand her wings, and take her flight to the realms of bties. 
what would she behold among those celestial choirs less than ten thousand timen 
ten thousand saints and angels, clad in robes of purest white, nnd intorstreaked 
with shining gold, and exulting in the all-glorious jiraises of God. What would be 
her raptures to hear the chief chenibim of heaven sweeping the cerulean strings ol 
their golden lyres symphoniously, and then the whole chorus of heaven, both vocal 
and instrumental, to fall in with them in one full burst of heavenly harmony ! she 
would not behold a single being hi so august a throng as millions, indifferent in the 
praises of God, nor hear one languid tone from the meanest seraph's tongue ; if such 
be the harmony of heaven, let it raise the flame of emulation in every bosom to instate 
the blest above. Let each singer peiform in church properly, enchoircl, and in the 
manner that it ought to be done, and grand effects will he the unavoidable result, if 
the music itself be good. By hearing good music well performed, we are ready to 
say, " O I ye enchanting, ecstatic, i.".d delightful sons and daughters of harmony ! O ! 
that I could take the wings of the morning, and soar aloft with your sublime itxains 
to the mansions of glory.'' ' 



ON THE DIFFERENT PLANS OF NOTATION. 



Tnerc are seven plans of notation used now m Tarious parts cf the world, which 
are to some extent national The English, faw, sole, law, faw, sole, law, me. 
Italian, doe, rae, me, faw, sole, law, see. French, ut, rae, me, faw, sole, law, 
see. Sioeeda and Danes, Dae, rae, nae, faw, sole, law, tee. In Germany, (among 
the peasantry,) 6cd in some parts of the United States, the numerical 1, '1, 3, 4, 



5, 6, 7. Spanish, perhaps, faw, sole, law, bae, doe, naw, me* — All repeating the 
first name, to make the eighth or octave sound. A very respectable number of my 
patrous being rather partial to the Italian, and also to the numerical system of 
seven syllables, 1 introduce a few examples, to make them plain to those who 
may wish to use them in learning to sing. 



EXAMPLES. 
3 2 1 1 




Doe, rae, me, faw, sole, law, see, doe, doe, see, law, sole, faw, me, rae, doe. Doe, rae, me, faw, sole, law, see, doe. 
CD EF GADCCBAG FE DC FGABCDEF 




Doe, rae, me, faw, sole, law, see, doe, doc, see, law, sole, faw, me, rae, doe. Doe, rae, me, faw, sole, law, see, doe. 
CD EF GABCCBAG FE DC GABCDEFGG 



I suppose the above will be sufficient, always observing the same order in other 
transpositions, remembering that the m.ajor or sharp key-note faw, is called doe ; 
sing the scale thus, doe, rae, me, &c., ascending ; and doe, see, law, &c. de- 
scending: numerical sing 1, 2, 3, &.c. ascending; and 1, 7, C, &.C. descending. For 
singing seven syllables Italian and the nmnerical, the transposition tables are 
generally written thus: 

The natural place for doe or 1 is on C 

But if B be flat, the place for doe or 1 is on...' F 

If B and E be fl.it, the place for doe or 1 is on B 

If B, E, and A be flat, the place for doe or 1 is on E 

If B, E, A, and D be flat, the place for doe or 1 is on A 

Ir F be sharp, the place for doe or I is on 

l! F and C be sharp, the r>'oce for doe at 1 is on D 



If F, C, and G be sharp, the pl»ce for doe or 1 is on. A 

If F, C, G, and D be sharp, the place for doe or 1 is on E 



ngiut; the seven syllables in our patent-note books, no regard U had to the shape of the notes, 
Jie them as laid down in the rule and examples; and in singinR numerals, call the major kev 
faw, 1, and the other notes by the numerical distance they are from the major key ; and if you 



use the other plans, sing as herein directed. 
Some contend that no one can learn to sing correctly without using the seven syllablefl. Although 
I have no objnctions to the seven .syllable plan, I differ a little with such in opinion, for 1 have tauglil 
the four syllables patent notes, the Italian seven syllables, and the numerals also, and in twenty-fivo 
years' experience, have always found my patent note pupils to learn as fast, and sing as correct as 
any. Cousequently I think that the main thing is to get good ttachers, who understand the science 
of music woll. and teach it faithfully, and who always keep good order in their schools; and that 
I ha various plans of notation or soluiization may be considered more a matter of taste than necessity 

TUU AUrilOIl. 
July. 185.1. 

xxxi 



DICTIONARY OF MUSICz\L TERMS. 



libievca. 



^iifiu very slow, Ine first mnod in roiunion limp C. 

Alkm-ii lively, quick, the tliird mooJ in roniinon liTiic C. 

Arrfnl a stress of the voice on a i>iirticuliir note or syllable. 

Acmtic, » poem, the first inters of the lines of wlneh lorin a name. 

Air, the tenor part, the niclin:Uion ot a piece of music. 

4;/.'iiigb above the stave. 

ilb), or AHus, hi'h counter. • 

Amielone, between a tone anrt semit.me. 

Ajfdhimo, Icn'ler, alTeciini, mournful, plamtive- 

Aii'lanle, moderate. 

Hiis.i, the lowest part of inu.^ic, eriive, solemn. 

Iliissiiin, a kind of wind instrument for bass. 

Wi.<s I'M. a large or bass tiddle. 

llrcve, an ancient note II, equal to two i 

Ul/mk verse, a poem without rhyme. 

Crmticlcn, divine or pious ooems, tongs. 

Chant, to sing praises. 

Cnnnrous, loud and harm«nious. , ., . 

Chord, a sound, a concord, proportional vibra jons. 

Chorus, nil the parts together. , . . 

Clefs characters representing particular sounds or des"**. 

Owunu. a small part, as 1 4, 1-olh, K<:. ol a lone. 

Crnreniln. increasing in sounds, fee. 

Ciimpose., to make tunes or set notes for music. 

Cimccrl, many singers or instruments together. 

Ciiiinler, :.-5 high treble performed in a female voice. 

Duigra:ii, the gamut or rudiments of music. 

D'uipason an octave, an eighth degree. 

Diisnnn .ce, discord, disagreement. 

Drr-ia. a tragical piece for the sta^e to be acted. 

Iitirf. two parts only moving together. 

Dii/dwtewli), diminishing in sound, becoming louder. 

Fnr'e or for, full, loud, or strong. . 

^■we or Fugha, the parts of music following each otlicr ui eucccmioh. 

h'i?n'ul, the scale or rudiments of music. 

(iraiid, full, great, complete, pleasing. 

Online, slow, solemn, mournful, most slow. 

CuiU), a direct. 

Uiirmiimi. a yieasing union of sounds. 

IliirmaiiU:, a writer of harmony, a musician. 

lIcTumter, having six l-.n.^ to a verse. 

Ifim/b^ or II-ibi,y, a V.i.l of'.v.no mslrumeirt. 

xxxii 



111711), a hymn oi song. 

Inliiiialvin, giving the pilch or key ol a tune. 

Interval, the distance between two degrees or soHInls. 

k"ys pfe'!.-es"o'f sih^r, ivory, kc. for the finger,-., on an instrument. 
Keu 'nute, the principal or leading note of each octave, 
"urgo, one degree quicker tlian the second mood m common lii^ic. 
/'i;na,'tlic dill'erence between mojor and minor. 

mi"ir%mmd, the sharp key, the great third, high, cheerful. 

Mujar chord, an interval having more semitonea t.ian a minor ch 

degrees. 
Mcdiiis, is low treble perlormcd in a man s voice. 
Mouds, certain proportions of lime, SiC. 
Modulate, to regulate sounds, to sing in a pleasing manner. 
iHusica. the art of music, the study or science of music. 
w"Sc a succes,sion of pieasing sounds, one of the lib.ja! science*. 
^'ecessarin, conlinuiiis; hke thorougli-bass. „„„:„ 

Vo/«, seven characters representing the degrees or sounds of music 
' The syllables applied by the •-'■■■"' ■•'" - f""'"v" v,,. 

Ut Re Mi Kaw Sol La Si 

C D E K r. A n _ 
Octave, an eighth degree, six tones and two semitones 
Ode. a jioem. . , . 

Ors"'!- llie largest of a!! mn.^ica) instruments. 
Piistoral. rural, a shepherd's song, 
Pmnn, or I'm. directs the performe: 
Penleiiieter. five lines to each verse 
I'itchpipe, a small instrument for provi 



The svllab'es applied by the Italians are as follows, j . j -• .. 

inesyiwo.es .11 _ 3^ ^. m,t , his plan has not been hnally adopu-d tui vie 

f\ n 5 Knglish music. 



thing pertniiiiiig to a shepherd, 
soil, a kind of jnBlrument 



ouiids. 



SctoA.'a note often used in tlie Psalms ol 

oerlians it may be a musical charartcr requiriii,. ....w...>. ,...,....^ ...„ .-- _. 

.SVr^SVa night song, music playe.l in the evening to entertain a Irien.l or lo 

fym^lwr.yX^^^^c'oi music willioul words, which the instrument i.Wv- «l. 

voices rest. 
Rijncojie, cut off, disjointed, nut of the usual orde 
Syneopatum, notes joined in the s.ime cegree in 
Trill, or 7V., a tune like a uhake or roll. 
Transpoxitiiiii, the cli,iiigiiig the place of liie key nolo. 
Trw, a tune in three part.i. 
VMimfttln. a tenor vi,>l. '-Sth aliov« n biu=t- vir.s 



attention, or sigf.ifying an 



'. position. 



FART I. 



^^UTAIXINO 



MOST OF THE PLAIN AND EASY TUNES COMMONLY USED IN TIME OF 

DIVINE WORSHIP. 



LIVERPOOL. C. M. 



M. C. H. Davis. 



Mer»:er's Cluster, page 146 




Young people ail, at - ten - tion give, And lieai what I shall say; I wish your bouIs with Christ to live. In ev - er - last - ing day. 



■^S^ii^^^S 



-p-®-p- 



:EE 



P-T-P- 



:F 



■^^^^^^mm 



Rememlicr you are hast'ning on To death's dark, gloomy ahadc ; Your joys on earth will soon be gone, Your flesh in dust be laid. 




2 Death's iror. gate you must pass through, 3 Young men, how can you turn your 4 Young women too, what will you do, 



Ere long, my dear young friends ; 
With wMom then do you think to go, 

With saints or fiery fiends 1 
Pray meditate before too late, 

While in a gospel land , 
Bet- old King Jesus at the gate, 

«.)Bt lovinalv dutli siaiid 
3 



From such a glorious friend ; [face 
Will you pursue your dang'rous ways 1 

O don't you fear the end "i 
Will vou pursue that dang'rous road 

Wniich leads to death and hell ' 
Will you refuse all peace with God, 

VVicl: devilf for to d ""U ^ 



If out of Christ you die % 
From all God's people you must go. 

To weep, lament, and cry : 
Where you the least relief can't find, 

To mitigate your pain ; 
Your good things all be left behind, 

Your souis in death remain 



5 Young people all, I pray then view 

The fountain open'd wide ; 
The spring of life open'd for sin. 

Which flow'd from Jesus' side ; 
There you may drink in endless jiiy, 

And reign with (yhrist your king. 
In his glad notes your souls employ, 

And halleliii^ttn nna. 



INVITATION 8 7 4 



^t■'m IValkcr. 



Baptist Harmony, p '?49 




1 Come, ye rinnere, poor and wretched. Weak and wounded, sick and sore, Jesus ready stands to save you, Full of pity, love, and pow'r • He is a - bic. 



.^:j3^^gg^ 




3 Ho ! ye thirsty, come and welcome, God's free bounty, gb ri - fy ; 'i>uo belief and true repentance, Every grace that brings us nigh, Without money, 





2 Let not conscience make you linger. 
Nor of fitness fondly dream , 
All the fitness he rcquircth. 
Is to feci your need of him ; 

This he gives you ; 
"ris the Spirit's rising beam. 

4 Come, ye wearv, heavy laden, 
Lost and ruin'd by the fall ; 
If you tarry till vou're better, 
You will never come at all : 

Not the righteous, 
Sinners Jesus came to call. 

6 View him proBtrate in the garden. 
On the ground your Saviour lies 
On the biDodr tree l>ehold him 



Hear him cry before he dies— 

" It is fmish'd !" 
Sinniirs, will not this suffice 1 

6 Lo ! th' incarnate O'od ascending. 

Pleads the merit of his blood ; 
Venture on him, venture wholly. 
Let no other Irust intrude : 

None but Jesus 
Can do helpless sirmers good. 

7 Saints and angels, join'd m concert 

Sing the praises of the Lamb ; 

While the bli=«fiil seats of heaven 

Sweetly echo with his name 

Hallelujah ! 
Sinners hete inav err.z the wimn 



i'RIMROSE C. M. 



Chaptn. Hvmn «m. b 8. vv au^ 



t^r^:-. 



;»zo. 



:l=t 



S=i 



:b 



It: 



PP 



1^^ 



a 



.^^^ 



-^_^. 



1 Sal - vation ! the joyful sound ! 'Tis pleasure to our fcars ; A sovereign balm for every wound, A cor - dial for our fe*r9 




2 Buried in sor - row and in sin, At hell's dark door we lay. But we a - rise by grace di - vine. To see a heav'uly day 



g^p^iss 



£Et 



■i^ M^ 



P£B 



^ 



zx 



f^^H^ 



3 Sal • vation ! let the echo fly The spacious earth around, While all the ar • mies of the sky Conspire to raise the sound. 
KEDRON. L. M. Dare. 



i 



P: 



-f3-P»-p- 



^t^affiSEEp 



-T-^ 



4p-fB- 



r^ 



■^P 



EPP 



-^B^. 



zn. 



►-#- 



p:rfpi^]^g!l£EiE;pr£g^Pil^p L^[^4 i ^ 



Thou Man of grief, remember me ; Thou never canst thy - self for - get Thy last ei - piring ag - o - ny — Thy fainting pangs and bloody sweat. 



%:fc ^^ f^. ^^ji^p^ £=f4^^i^ ^^;pE ag|Ep^^l#' 



xMEDiTATlUJS. L. M 



Dover helecUon, n. » 




ToJay, if you will hear his voice, Now is the time to make your choice ; Say, will you to Mount Zion go f Say, will you have this Christ, or no ! 



^ 



-O 



EEl 



-Pi?: 



g 



OTTT 



TZt 



s 



d 






—^2 

IB 



HANOVER. C. M. 



Baptist Harmony, p. 247. 




^^S^M?^^^^ 



Come, humble sinner, L*. whose breast A thousand thoughts revolve, Come with your guilt and fear opprest. And make this last resolve. 



aaEs:-3 



i 



-6-9 



iz. 



-n^i^ 



'^~ 



§ 



^ 



BI~B 



2 I'll go to Jesus, though ray sin 

Hath like a mountain rose; 
I know his courts, I'll enter in 
Whatever may oppose. 

3 frosiiate I'll lie before his throne. 

And there my guilt confess , 

Pll tell him I'm a wrrtch undone 

Without hiS suverciun pra^A 



ItF 



g^^S^^ff 



4 Pll to the gracious King approach, 
Whose sceptre pardon gives; 
Perhaps he may command my touch, 
And then the suppliant lives. 
f Perhaps he may admit mv plea. 
Perhaps will hear my prayer ; 
But if I pf-rish, I will pray, 
Aiul [urii-h onlv there 



6 I can but perish if I go, 

1 am resolv'd to try ; 
For if I stay away, I know 
I must for ever die. 

7 But if I die with mercy sought. 

When I the King have trieJ, 
Thi" were to die dlclightfa' thought 
As Kinn*'r never t(^a. 



SUPPLICATION. L. M. 



5 1 St Tsalm. A' arts. 



te^^^^^p 



aeE3^ 



*=i"^ 



^^^^i^ 



i^i^E^fei^i^^BES; I 




I O thou who hear'st when sinners crj Tho' all my crimes before thee lie, Uehold them not with angry look, But blot their mem' ■ ry from thy book. 



itgr; 



^ p^pE^fe ^i-ifjrof 



pcin 



EEEE 



jaiai 



RESTORATION. 8, 7. 



fe 



■ZjE 



B^ 



IfJL 



£S 



t£ 



IBCct^ 



P¥^ 



M^Fr=^ 



^ 



?-> 



^ff filF^E^y-j -lliri^^Fi^ l^Fp^ gp^^^^f c^^^g-^^ 



Mercy, C thou Son of Da - vid ! Thus blind Barti - meus pray'd : Others by thy grace are saved, O vouchsafe to me thine aid. 




MAKi^SVILLE. L. M 



|?-PEfe-^feEffitg^^|gisiEifegF^|ff^:^^ 



^^cc_ n n^ l H ai3. Q '' Zl^cq ^n * ^ 



Jesus, my all, to heav'n is gone — He whom I fix'd my hopes upon ; Ilia track I sec, and I'll pureuc The nar - row way till him I view. 



IBl 



Pfspipa 



e-^^*- 



f*- 



3^ 



t--.itm 



Zr.^J^. 



^^~Pr-F 



ci=»zf»-r 



r?!z.t 



* 



n 



-^ 






n 



iiiii 



PTr.<^r 



KING OF PEACE. 7s. 



F. Price. 



-&--7— F 



^=F 



^ 



^F 



P 



tmip: 



'-l^^- 



EpEFi^ 






-j i I =— t \ [— ■= \ •am—' B— I [- 1 Ks I 1 1 



-^P 



-t-i — (— 



^i 



Children of the heav'niy King, As ycjour-ney sweetly sing: Sing your Saviour's worthiest praise. Glorious in his works and ways 



~6 



EE^ 



E^=EEE^3I 



:£ 



Bis: 






o^-p-e— r- 



i|?EfiS=gi 



^ 



rs^e^ 



NINETY-THIRD PSALM. S. M 



^^^ ^F^ 



i: 



Chapin. Baptist Harmony, [>. lai 



ri^ZlP 



1 



Ete^fesg 



1 Grace! 'tia a charm - iiig sounJ: Har - mo - nious to the car ! Heav'ii with the o - cho shall re bouiuI, And all the earth shall boar. 



=3^ _ 



i^ 






-O-P^B 



£i 



SifsS 



SI 



2 Grace first con - triveJ the way To save re - bel - Uou« man ; And all the steps that grace dia - play, Which drew the wondrous plan. 



m-^ 



^ 



£3 



m 



5s= 



^4=^F 



Eefe 



::i£: 



8 Grace first inscribed my name 4 Grace led my roving feet 

In God'g eternal book ; To tread the heavenly road ; 

Twas grace that gave me to the Lamb, And new supplies each hour I meet. 

Who all my sorrowa took. While pressing on to Go<L * 

WEEPING SAVIOUR. S.M. 

•J H BTl tr^ 



e 



r-:^ 



^iP 



a 



£3:5:6-1 



nztsi 



5 Grace taught my soul to pray, 
And made my eyes o'erflow ; 
Twas grace that kept me to this day, 
And will not let me go. 



6 Grace all lb'' work shall crown. 
Through everlasting days ; 
It lays in ncaven the topmost stone, 
And well deserves the praise 




H. J. King. 



1. Did Christ o'er sinner's weep ? Arid shall our cheeks be dry ? .... Let floods of pen - i - ten-tial grief Burst forth from ev'ry eye. 



^ 



i 



-t 



±t^±n 



ijmi 



2. The Sou of God in tears, Angela with won-der see, Be thou as-ton-ish'd, my soul ! He shed those tears fur thee. 



Syt^ 



^t:^=$ 



ai: r"rrtrnr"f 



ZHMZ 



gg 



£a 



?. Ue went that we might weep, Kaoh sin demands a tear, In heav'n a - lone no sin is found, And there's no weeping there 



NEW BRITAIN. C. M. 



Uaptist Harmony, p. H3. 



mm^&m^^m^ 



53: 



-Bm 



I^BI 



1 Amazing grace ! (how sweet the sound) That saved a wretch like me ! I once was lost, but now am found, Was blind, but now I see 



|E^ ^5^P^ fe=^PEfe|E£Eg.gp^ 



-S. 



s: 



^l^iSS 






2 'Twos grace that taught my heart to fear, And grace my fears relieved : How precious did that grace ap - pear, The hour I first believed I 



ix*-5; 



m 



grei 



m 



S^ri^fS 




3 Through many dangers, toils, and snares, 4 The Lord has promised good to me, 5 Yes, when this flc?h and heart shall fail, 6 The earth shili soon distiofve like tmow, 

I have already come ; His word my hope secures ; And mortal life shall cease. The suii forbear to shine ; 

'Tis grace has brought me safe thus far, He will my shield and portion be, I shall possess, within the veil, But God, who call'd rne here below, 

And grace will lead me home. As long as life endures. A life of joy and peace. Will be for ever mme> 



COOKHAM. 7's. 



Baptist Harmon)^, p. 329. 



H& 



4=-^:^ 



EE^S 



^^ 



-p-r- f » [T ^if^ 



ftpm 



m 



3Z5 



M^p^-^rl - r^^^^^''^^^^ 



-G^ 



-A — ^^P-^- f 



Lord I cannot let thee go. Till a blessing thou besvow ; 



Do not turn a - way thy face. Mine's an urgent, pressmg case. 



^z^zntrt^ 



i^:: 



m 



ff-^ 



:p-|^f>"|z±±=^ 



iS 



^^^S 



'i-^'- 



THE CONVERTED THIEF. C. M. D 



More. Mercer's Clusiei, ji. 3i. 



^P 



:ptFtEpa 



;^EF^|=^ : g|^p^^^^^E ^'p£p 



r 

As on the croes the Saviour hung. And wept, and bled, and died, He pour'd salvation on a wretch. That languish'd at his side. His crimes with mward grief and shame, The 






-pp-> 



-p-^_ 



'fff^^FEglEz^ - ^-piS ^EpH 



-P-J- 



Jcsas, thou Son and heir of Hcav'n ! Thou spoticcs Lamb of God ! I see thee bathed in sweat and tears. And welt'ring in thy blocd. Yet quickly from these scenes cf wo In 






scf ^ 



tcP: 



f2L. 



m 



^ 



:ss 



-p-f 



mm 



penitent confess'd ; Then tum'd his dying eyes to Christ, And thus his prayer addrcss'd : 




1 "■—! rr 

tririmph thou shait rise ; Burst thro' the gloomy shades of dcith, And shine above the skies 



^^- 



f=a=^-: 



:^2: 



JDl 



^EIS±ZI 



r-fc- 



I. i 1 



§^M 



" Amid the glories oi tt>al world. 

Dear Saviour, think on me. 
And in the victories of thy death, 

Let me a sharer be/* 
His prayer the dying Jesus bearx. 

And instantly replica. 
To-day ihy parting suui ahsil bt 

With me in Paradise. ' 



10 



WEBSTER. S. lu. 




=i-e= 



m 



Bz^B: 



IHLIII 



^ 



T-isy^ 



nzfTi: 



iZE 



^^'^?^p=i=^ 



e--- 



i^ 



1 — \ I 



-^ 



:£; 



^ 



Wf^ 



22: 



SFEF^S? 



i»-h- 



'-LLCZ 



£ 



£=t 



:S33 



I 



^:^ei]^ 



Come, we that love the Lord, And let our joys be known; Join in a song with sweet accord, And thus surround the throne 



^^fe 



V-W-W- 



^^^^^i 



ORTONVILLE. C. M. 



SLOW. NEW TREBLE. 




I.Am la sol-dier of the cross, A fol-low'r of the Lamb 1 And shall I fear to own his cause. Or blush to speak his name ! Or blush to speak his name ? 



:fc^ 



^3-k- 



^E3 



n^ 



far*b-V- 



tztit 



e^ 



EEFtE" 



2. Must I be car-ried to the skies On flow'ry beds of ease, While others fought to win the prize. And sailed thro' bloody seas? And sailed thro' bloody seast 

~ns£r1-r- 




3 Arc there no foes for me to face ? 
.Must I not stem the fluud 
Is this vile world a friend to grace, 
To help me on to GoJ ? 



4 Sure I must fight, if I would reign ; 
Increase my courage. Lord ; 
I'll bear the toil, endure the pain. 
Supported by thy word. 



I 1 

5 Thy saints in all this glorious war 
Shall conquer though they die 
They see the triumph from afar, 
And seize it with thoir evo. 



6 When that illustrious day shall riM, 
And all thy armies shine 
In robes of victory through the bkies 
The glory shall be thine 



JERUSALEM ii M 



^fm. fValker. Baptist Harmony, p. 10. 



11 



lii^^SfeEpEai^l^ 



It-. 



^^"^m^. 



1 Je • BU3 my all to heav'n is gone, He whom I fix my liopes up • on ; ') 
His track I see, and I'll pur -sue The narrow way till liim I view f 



h^- 



■P-^- 



gi 



2 The way the ho - ly prophets went ; The road that leads from banishment ; 
The King's highway of ho - li • nessi, I'll go, for all bis paths are peace. 



p. 



izE: 



jr- ^ary 



H_l BT 






feg^Y 



anna 






ff 



I'm on my journey home, to the new J iru- 






Fm on my journey home, to the new Jerusalem, 



Sfc 



m 



r-^-p-p-p-:— P-=^- 



5^ 



azz 



^ 



?ES 



S£l 







fB-p-p-B- 



So fare you well, :|: 



E^P 



I am going home. 



jgZM. 



:5iB-i: 



SZjdlZJE 



ilff 



3 This is the way 1 I.mg have sought, 
And mourn'd because I found it not ; 
My grief a Imrdci; long has been. 
Because I v/aS' not saved from sin. 



4 The more I strove against its power, 5 Lo ! glad I come, and thou, blest Lamh, 6 Then will I tell to sinners round. 



^E 



I felt its weight and guilt the more ; 
Till lote I heard my Saviour say, 
" Come hither, soul, I am the wax." 



Shalt take me to thee, whose I am ; 
Nothing but sin have I to give. 
Nothing but love shall I receive. 



What a dear Saviour I have found 
I'll point to thy redeeming blood. 
And say " Behold the way to God "" 



12 



SALEM C. M. 



Uossey's Choice, p W. 



4= 



^E^^g^E 



5^toi 



pspifs: 



E^S^ 



Tut:* 



;a- r-^ a 






I How sweet the name of Jesus sounds, In a believer's ear ; It soothes his sorrows, heals his TO'inds, And drives away his fear. 



;^IP?^ 



^^^Fpgg^^q^^g^^^^^pg^^^^ 



3 It makes the wounded ^i - rit whole. And calms the troubled breast ; 'Tis manna to the hungry soul. And to the weary rest 



-P:, 



^E#E3EEEEe3 



L=E4 



P B- 



£E: 



ff-r-p- 



£S: 



^I^S^E^^^ 



;:. . n1 ^ 



aE^Ee^ 



X 



= ^^p^^^?yfrP^ 



;^SEE 



;Ee£ 



1 
i 



And drives away his 



i±aEEE§fe^ 



p'O 




It soothes his sorrows, heals his wonnds. And drives away bis fear. 

=&rx=fc>:^ '=-^ — ^ 



I^ 



'Tis manna to the hungry soul. And to the weary 



3^E 



izor 



£P-BZgzE 






3 Dear name ! the rock on which I build, 4 Jesus ! my shepherd, husband, friend, 5 Weak is the effort of my heart. 

My shield and hiJing-pIace; My prophet, priest, and king; And cold tny warmest thought; 

My ncver-failins treasury, fill'd My Lord, my life, my way, my end. But when I see thee as thou art. 

With Ixjundless stores of grace. Accept'thc jiraise I bring. I'll praise thee as I oueht 



6 Till then I would thy love proclaim 
With every fleeting breath ; 
And may the music of thy name 
RefresQ mv wnJ in dea& 



DUBLIN. C. M 



1^ 



ISIlP 



^?-^ 



FF^F^FF^- g 



^^^^ 



-p-p. -h g;-= 



i» 



fl 



^l iTTplfB ^^g^^feEg^^^^^i^lS^JJpp 



Lord, what is man, poor fee-ble man! Born of the earth at first; His life a shadow, light and vain, Still hast'ning to the dosu 



^PPEPEP 



^ 



;p^ 



:& 



i^ 



t=& 



P=[:c 



-P- 



^gS 



@?~7»~ ^rF-FF 



g 



?3: 



kilze: 



^ 



^ 



DEVOTION. L. M. 



:ft& 



S^ 



^ 



Haspg^^j^pl^ 



11 r 

Sweet 13 the day of sacred rest. No mortal cares shall seize my breast. 



;P 



S 



lFF 



p 



F=^ 



^Sie 



pS^^^.i^fe^feSi 



^^^^^^S^^S^PS^i 



may my heart in tune be found, Like David's harp of solemn sound. 



u 



MINISTER'S FAREWELL C M 






fe§p 



elteBSffi 



l^^gpp^ 



Dear friends, farewell, I do you tell, Siitce you end I must part ; ? Your love to mo has been most free. How can I bear to journey where 

1 go away, ami here you Btay, But gtill we're join'd in heart, 5 Your conversation sweet ; With you I cannot meet ! 



^S^^S^^ 



:f^ 



S2Z^ 



L-iii 



^^^^ 



^^^S^^H 




gS^fea^ jpfitt 



% Yet do I find my heart mclined 

To do my work below : 
When Christ doth call, I trust I shall 

IJc ready then to go. 
I leave you all, bcilh great and small, 

In Christ's encircling arrn.i. 
Who can you save from the cold grave. 

Ana shield you from all narm. 



3 I trust you'll pray, both night and day, 

And keep your garments white, 
For you and me, that we may be 

The children of the light. 
If you die first, anon you must, 

The will of God be done 
I hope the Lord will you reward, 

With an immortal crown 



4 If Tm call'd home whilst I am gone, 

Indulge no tears for me ; 
I hope to sing and praise my King, 

To all cicmity. 
Millions of years over the spheres 

Shall pass in sweet repose. 
While iwauty bright unto my sight 

THv sacred swe*!ts disclose. 



5 I long to go, then farewell wo. 

My soul will be at rest; 
No more shall I complain or sigh. 

But taste the heavenly feast, 
may we meet, and be complete. 

And long together dwell. 
And serve the Lord wilh -no accord 

And .MO. dear friends. iiuowelL 



DAVIS. 11, 8. 



Bapt'st Harmony, p. 460. 



lb 



^^Sii^^^^i^^^^fet^S 




O Thou in whose presence my soul takes (lcli|;ht, On wnom in afflicbon I call, My comfort by day and my song in the night. My hope, my salvation, my alL 



m 



^- 



: k'(T"^T~ jp |>r^|'^]rp^:f'T~|"P — pis: 



EteffliEa 



p-r^P-9- 



^^ 



rm=^=^ 



£^ 



I 



2 Whore dost thou at nonnlide resort ivith thy sheep. 

To feed on the pasture of love 1 
For why in the valley of death should I weep — 
Alone in the wilderness rove ! 

3 O why should I wander an alien from thee. 

Or cry in the de-sert lor bread 1 
My foes would reioicc when my sonows they see. 
And smile at the tears I have shed, 

4 5fe daughters of Zion, declare, have you seen 

The Star that on Israel shone ; 
8»y if in your tents my Beloved hath been 
And where <viib his flock he hath cone. 



5 This is my Beloved, his form is divine, 

His vestments shed odours around ; 
The locks on his head are as grajies on the vine, 
When autumn with plenty is crown'd. 

6 The roses of Sharon, the lilies that grow 

In vales on the banks of the streams ; 
His checks in the beauty of excellence blow, 
His cy« all invitingly beams. 

7 His voice, as the sound of a dulcimer sweet, 

Is heard through the shadow of death, 
The cedars of Lebanon bow at his feet, 
Tbe air is perfumed with his breath. 



8 His lips as a fountain of righteousness flow. 

That waters the garden of grace. 
From which their salvation the gentiles shall know 
And bask in the smiles of his face. 

9 Love sits on his eyelid and scatters delight. 

Through all the bright mansions on high : 
Their faces the cherubim veil in his sight. 
And tremble with fulness of joy. 

10 He looks, and ten thousanas of angels rejoica. 
And myriads wait for his word ; 
He speaks, and eternity, fiU'd with his voice. 
Re-echoes the cravsc of her Lord 



16 



re-:- 



STAR IN THE EAST 10, 11. 



Baotist Harmony, p. 35 



E^g^jE^ ^^^feggg^^fs ^ ^jg^gSgg 



pnp 



^ ^F4t±ilzjd:^fJitfC^ ^p=M^^ ^ 



S 



±S 



t-ESfe 



Hail the blest mom, see the great Mediator, Down from the regions of glory descend ! "i Chobcs 

Shepherds, go worship the babe in the manger, Lo, for his guard the bright angels attend. 5 



Brightest and best cf the sons of the morning ! 



tt 



s 



"B"B 



P=P 



P^^z-i 



^Fg^^g^ gSg 



jFTrnp-jjit 



es 



'-P- 



^ 



eeee 



m 



£^ 



F^F^Ep 



EEE£ 



F§^§^^ 



pnn 



HSSEiS 



£5? 



:ii 



S 



Dawn on our darkness, and lend us thine aid ; Star in the east, the ho - ri - xon a • doming. Guide where our infant Re - deemer was laid. 



WE 



F 



-^— p- 



"LJ L 



t^=3X 



-P-F-F^- 



E 



""B~E~ 



E3 



^ 



ih: 



FE!^ 



PS 



en: 



2 ColJ on his cradle tho dew-drops arc shining ; 
Low lies his bed, with the beasts of the stall ; 
Angels adore him, in ^:luInbl;rB reclining, 
Wifio men and shepherds before him do fall. 

Iliiuhtur't and In^st. &>■ 



3 Say, shall we yield him, in costly devotion, 4 Vainly we offer each ample oblation, 

Odours of Eden, and offerings divine, Vamly with gold we his favour secure . 

Gems from the mountain, and pearls from the ocean, Richer by far is the liiart's adoration; 
Myrrh from the forest, and gold from the mine ■■ Dearer to tSod are Ihe prayers of the pnoi 

lliiirhtost and liest. Ac. lJric!il:>.', uii.l w»i. Am 



MIDDLEBURY. o. o, u 



Methodist Hymn Book, p. 35^ 



IT 



E|^S^S^^^:^^iSEii^g^^|jigS^i 



s^SS^isi^ 



nra£:f^i 




Come away to the skies. My beloved, arise, And rejoice in the day thou wast born ; On this festival day, Come exulting away, And with singin" to Zion return. 




CONSOLATION. C. M. 



WM 



^^-^ 



rzc 



SS^ 



rcii 



H 



^- 



£ 



Dean. 



Hj'mn 6. B. 2, Watts. 



&EEE^ 



lE 



E 



sie 



B 



m 



re-' 



1 Once more, my soul, the ns - ing day Salutes thy waking eyes ; Once more, my voice, thy tri - bute pay To him that rules the skies. 



f^F^ffl^N^^ 



rP 



s 



:d 



e^EHE^ 



5 



^1 



2 Night unto night his name re - peats. The day renews the sound. Wide as the heav'n on which ha sits. To turn the sea - sons round. 




a 'Pis he supfA/rU my mortal framo, 4 On a poor worm thy pow'r might tread, 5 A thousand wretched souls are fled 6 Dear God, let all my nours be thine, 

5iy tongue shall speak his praiae ; And I could ne'er withstand , Since the last setting sun, Whilst I enjoy tne iight 

My sins would rjuse his wrata to flame, Thy justice might have crush'd me dead, An-J yet thou length'nest out my thread, Then shall my sun m smiles decline, 

Aiid yet his wratb dctayn. But mercy held thine hand. And yet my moments run. And ^^in3 a pleasant night 
4 



COMPLAINER 7. h 



IVm. PTalker 



»*v^V^ 



a - 



^? 



-F-F 



3^E 



M 



3^ 



>-p-^- 



£; 



zi^P :, 



p-a-pr-^ 



-rf— I 



-P-P-P 






1 I am a gieat complaincr, that bears the name of Christ ; Come, all ye Zion mourners, and listen to my cries : I've many sore temptations, and sorrows to my 



^-- 



^^ 



-F^ 



tP 



tiSipt 



E 






2 O Lord of life a«d glory, my sins to me reveal, And by thy love and power, my sin-sick soul be beal'd ; I thought my warfare over, no trouble I should 



^ -j- h ^-"— rT+1— PPh— y-r-H-i i I' ' i i 1 1— p-P I r-jr-r- lrr^l I'M 




see ; But now I'm likn the lonely dove, that mourns on the wa- 

[vering tree. 



^± 



^^^^m 



3 I wish it was with me now, as in the days of old. 
When the glorious light of Jesus was flowing in my soul ; 
But now I am distressed, and no relief can find, 

With a hard deceitful heart, and a wretched wandering mind. 

4 It is great pride and passion, beset me on my way, 
So I am filf d with folly, and so neglect to pray ; 
While others run rejoicing, and seem to lose no time, 
I am so weak I stumble, and so I'm left behind. 

5 I read that peace and happiness meet Christians in their nay. 
That bear their cross with meekness, and don't neglect to pr»y 
But I, a thousand objects beset me in my way 

So I am iiU'd with folly, and so neglect to pray. 



HICKS' FAREWELL 




2 Let persecution rage around, T' revive the strong, confirm the w 

And Antichrist appear ; - And after sinners call. 

My silent dust beneath the ground; 5 My brother preachers, fare you well, 

There's no disturbance there. Your fellowship 1 love; 

3 Tl.ro' heats and colds I've often went, 4 In time no more I shall you sec 

And winder'd in despair. But soon we'll meet above. 

To call poor sinners to repent, 6 My little chililren near my heart, 

^AniLscok the Saviour dear. And nature seems to bind , ^. 

Tr["*v brother preachers, boldly speak, II grieves me sorely to depart, 

And stand on Zion's wall, ^AjjJ. leave you all behind. 

CANON. Four in One. 7's. 



7 O Lord, a father to them be. 

And keep them from all harm. 
That they may love and worship thee, 
And dwell upon thy charms. 

8 My loving wife, my bosom friend, 

The object of my love. If '2 

The time's been sweet I've spent with you, 
My fiwent and harmless dove. 

9 My loving wife, don't grieve for me. 

Neither lament nor mourn ; 



For I shall with my Jesus be, 
When you are left alone. 

10 How often you have look'd for me, 

And ofttimes seen me come; 
But now I mustAlopart Oom thee. 
And never more return. 

1 1 For I can never come to thee ; 

Let this not grieve your heart. 

For you will shortly come to me, 

Where we shall never part.* 



I 



fej^-rieaJ^SisfeE^^ fe^ gEggggl 



Welcome, welcome, cvVy guest. Welcome to our music feast : Music is our on - ly cheer, Fill both soul and ravish'd ear ; Sacred I^ine, teach us the mooj. 



^jEg,^^_ ^jEgEg^: 



Sweetest notes to De explored. Softly swell the trembling aii, To complete our concert fair. 



• This song was coapose<] by the Rev. B. Hicks, (a Baptist minister of South Caiolina,) and sent to his wife while he was confined in Tenneiece »> * fe» of whicli 
06 aftcTwar<ifl rp(»/-'-eTO<* 



aO 



THE FAMILY BIBLE. 12, 11. 



jgi p^P^ p^^iii^sggE 






lectian Of youthful con - nex - ion and in - nocent joy, While blest with pa - rent - si oJ- 




1 ^~^ 
: and af - fcction. Surrounded with mercy and peace from o 



high ; 

3 



1 — •^-9- 

I still view the chairs of my 



father 



d mother, The scat? of their 



7fl[ 



pnni;, 88 




li»e broken hearted, And wander a 



n^^s^s^^^. 



O hymns of thanksgiving with harmonious sweetness, As warm'd by the hearts of the 



S~Br!l»' -JS_fl-el_L 
-J iM 



lone on a far distant shore ; 



O why should I doubt a dear Saviour's protection. For - gelful of 



gifts from hia 



FAMILY BIBLE. Condudca. 



21 



ranged on each hand, And the rich - est of books, \vhich ex • eels ev' - ly other, The fami - ly Bible that by on the stand. 




.- jgEl^^^ggsjE gE-^^li^^^^ 



^— 3l — el — -^~ 



^i^^^^^^ S^^^^Ej^^^^^ 



fa • mi - ly band, Hsth raised us from eanh to that rap - tu - reus dwelling, Described in the Bible that Uy on the stand. 



Ei^^i:3^9E3EE?EiEE^S 



s 



■s^ 



isi: 



=F 



:P^ 



EE3=5 



m 



boun - ti - fill hand ; O let me with patience re - ceive his cor - rertion. And think of the Bible that lay on the stand. 



?=^ 



^=^P=pE^^pBE^^^I:F|EF^ ^E p^^|^ J 



4 Blest Bible ! the light and the guide of the stranger, 

With it I seem circled with parents and friends ; 
Thy kind admonition shall guide me from danger ; 

On thee my last lingering hope then de])ends. 
Hope wakens to vigour and rises to glory ; 

ril hasten and flee to the promised land, 
And for refuge lay hold on the ho|ie set before me, 

Reveal'd in the Bible that lay on the stand. 

5 Hail, rising the brightest and best of the morning. 

The star which has guided my parents safe home ; 
The beam of thy glory, my pathway adorning, 
iihaU scatter the darkness and brighten the gloom. 



As the old E«stem ssges to worship the stranger 
Did hasten with ecstasy to Canaan's land, 

I'll bow to adore him, not in a low manger, — 
He's seen in the Bible that lay on the stand, 

6 Though age .and misfortune press hard on my feelings, 

I'll flee to the Bible, and trust in the Lord ; 
Though darkness should cover his merciful dealings. 

My soul is still checr'u by his heavenly word. 
And now from things earthly my soul is removing 

I soon shall glory with heaven's bright bands. 
And in rapture of joy he forever adoring 

The God of the liible that lay on the stand. 



OLD HUNDRED. L. M. 




:^^^^p^F^^ ^fe^^p|^p |^^ai 



^^^fel 




t=^^^ 



O come, louJ anthems let us sing, Loud thanks to our Almighty King, For we our voices high should raise, When our salvation's Rock we praise. 

r 



^ 



::qi 



^|^PEp^p S^^^ ^>^|"^^ Phg|E^|j gf^ 



^^l-l--p- 



^^^^^pj^^^j-^jj^ft-^-^ig^S^ii^ 



DISTRESS. L. M. 







m- 



,-^^ 



lE^S 



-Q-P-CZ 



I T 



f-^X 



:^ 



^^^ 



p- 



^F^R 



if-i^EiiH 



So lades the love - ly, blooming flow'r. Frail, smiling solace of an hour. So soon our transient comforts fly. And pleasure only blooms to die. 



agZgP£Ep^ispB Ep|^.^^^fe3p]^^:gE^15 ^^-i^ 



ALB10>J. S. M. 



Boyd. 



23 



e-- 



^w 



s 



E 



^-p- 



t±i 



^zexztfTi 



i=xr 



g^^ ^ g^^>=F^ ^ 



^='=Fh ^^^^ iF^F^F^ fe£^^ 



':m:zz.zx2l 



Come, ye that love the Lord, And let your joys bo known ; Join in a song with sweet accord. And thus surround the throne, And thus, &c. 



^^r^r^^ ^ 



-p-»- 



P^^g^gg^^ 



s-^-" 






H^ 



^ 



^ - 



3ZL 



ig 



PEQ 



:^3>: 



^^^^i^^J 



GHARLESTOWN. 8, 7. 



il 



^ 



j!zs2: 



:F^ 



-r- 



f^ ^4 - H-f 4i^^^£5E3Ep£^ETga^£E^^E^| 



Alercy, O thoa Son of David, Thus poor blind Bartiineus pray'd ; Others by thy grace are saved. Now to me af - ford thine aid. 






3^£E^g 



^?=Fa^ 



XJ 



g 



-,^T- 



z:Q:PzPi& 



n~i — I r 



s-a— 



P^EtHE^pi 






S 



E 



:^=t=t^ 



£ZSE 



• ' i I r: 



f J .o ?- 



'Si 



a 



24 



PROSPECT OF HEAVEN. 8, 7, 8, 8, 7. ^i- Gramblmg. ^ See Baj-c. Harm. p. 433 



^teg 



cfc 



£ttgtg=E 






-- — pp^ 



;CJI 



-p-^- 



±: 



^rg^^P^"^-g 



'XH^ITt 



3eES^ffiE^i3g5£SSE^5fffi 



p-^ 



S§ 



=F^ 



^3^ 



^fff 






The faithless world promUcuous flowa, Enrapl in fancy's vision, Allured by sounds, beguiled by show, And empty dreams ; they scarroly know There is a brighter heaven. 

IS 



^feiE 



\—3 



iTHiis: 



^fe^E 



:g^J 



feilE^Sife^E 



M^- 



MEAR. C. M. 



-if-« 



=^=? 



£ 



en 



^h=rf^ ^^-^l— 



--S— -! 



fe5E^SiEpSl=. 



rEZi: 



^>-ie- 






=f=^ 



^=3^HE 



Will God for cv - er cast us off! His wrath for ever Bmoke Against the i«o - p.e of hia love, His lit - tie cho - sen flock 1 



Lzirri^ 



:^E^=g^ 



-e-l-h ^-^ 



^S^ 






CRUCIFIXION. 7's. ». 



Baptist Harmony, p. 477 



2fl 




g^^gg ^^si^ g^glSf p^ ^lff^ff 



sb^- 



■^_1»_ 






.fiP 



:!^^ 



>-«-• 



•p"-&E 



Y3L 



g^aj^^^^e^lpg^t 



Saw ye my Saviour, :§: 



gilS£|^PzPtJ|g 



Saw yc my Saviour and God \ ho died on Calvary, To atone for you and me, And to purchase our pardon with blood. 



33 



ts 



?= 



s 



~V~W' 



ZZC 



:&& 



^-^Pj^M^ J 



\T^ 



XT 



INDIAN'S FAREWELL. 6 lines 7's. 



ftf^^^pF 



P-F-t 



m 



&fcP±^tdF 



iP^ 



'r-T 



-p-p. 



:PB 



^Fwi. Walker. 



s 



&•- 



EB 




"I — I » : '^— t r~r , , , , 

1 When shall we all meet again 1 :[: Oft shall glowing hope expire, Oft ihall wearied love retire, Oft shall death and sorrow reign, Ere we all shall meet again. 




^fegPtf- 



3 Though in distant lands we sigh, 
Parch'd beneath a hostile sky, 
Though the deep between us rolls 
Friendship shall unite our souls, 
And in fancy's widp domain, 
'>n aboU vre all mw!t aguix 



3 When our burnish'd locks are gray, 
Thinn'd by many a toil-spent day, 
When around the youthful pme 
Moss shall creep and ivy twine ; 
Long may the loved bow'r remain, 
Gre we all shall meet again. 



4 When the dreams of life are fled, 
When its wasted lamps are dead. 
When in cold oblivion's shaiie, 
Beauty, fame, and wealth arc laid. 
Where immortal spiriw rei^m. 
There may we ait meet a£un. 



26 



THE CHRISTIAN, or CARNSVILLE. 7,7,7,6,7,7,7,6. Zion Songster, p. 78. K. J. King 



S — a — »- 



^-4-r-:^ ^^ ^ \» ^ \ _> ^ : _:— > k 



^£ 



il ^ In* K~ 



-(• — *- 



^ 



E^^gg 



d^ 



1. I loTe my bles3-eJ Sa-Tiour, I feel I'm in lii8 fa-TOur, And I am bis for ev - er, If I but faitli-ful prove; 



w^s^^^^^^^^m^m 



ink 



2. Poor sin - ncrs may de - ride me, And un - be - liev- era chide me, But no-thing shall di - vide mo From Je - sus, my best friend. 



^ Bgg 



i=fc: 



^ t** 



-ta ta- 



•^ W' 



t_ 



^ 



Mh 



. L ^ = 



8. The pleas - ing time is hast'-ning. My tott'ring frame iswast-ing While I'm en-gaged in prais-iug, Im-pell-ed by his love 



^^^^ ^-^^r^jU'^¥~- f^^^^^^^W^ 



And now I'm bound for Ca - naan, I feel my sins for - giv - en. And soon shall get to hea-ven. To sing re - deem-ing love. 




fe^^H 



Sup - port - cd by his po>y - er, I long to see the hour 



Th.at bids my spi-rit tow - er. And all my trou-bles end. 



i-^fefee 




gJSggp 




When yon - der shin - ing or - ders, Who sing on Ca-naan's borders, Shall bear me to the Lord there To praise his name a ■ bove 



AMEKIUA. o. in 



'Vhitmore. 



-^^^M^^^ 



S^^^ 



i 



a — 



F5^- 



^3^5 



-I — L 



=3= 



£; 



My soul, repeat his praise, Whose mercies are so great ; 



;F^Stei?§ 



Whose anger is so slow to rise, 



:pr 



^^^^liiS^il 




^^^^l pf^teteEF,^g^gg |g&:i 



s 



.^EB. 



\^^ 



NINETY-FIFTH. C. M. 



Colton. 



w 



T r p^ 



EE 



^-^: 



siP:i©i± 



iPj-P- 



;EiF^ 



ml 



^El 



=-(1- -fcr 



SeP^ 



Qio; 



^_ _[— a 



E^^^^^fff^te^^^,^ 



When I can read my title dear. To mansions in the skies, 

i. 



:r-S 



EP 



^ 



ISZHifF^ 



3=5: 



I'll bid farewell to ev'ry fear, and wipe ray weeping eyea, 

1 I 



;cip 



IPOE 



^: 



g PFFFF 



^=r^i>3E 



fc3r^ 



^^^^Ef 



^Ci 



XSZ!S 






-s-B-a 



i~rr 



M 



^_r^ P 



j5:^:i:i 



-QrlS 



^ 



nr 



XI 



-=rz 



TENNESSEE. C. M. 



Baptist Jlarnroiiy, p. 227. 





3 What have I gain'J by sin, he said, 

But hunger, shame, and fear 1 
My father's house abounds with bread, 
Whilst I am starving here. 

4 I'll go and tell hira all I've done. 

Fall down before his face. 
Not worthy to be called his son, 
I'll oak a ser\ant's place. 

5 He saw his son returning hacit. 

He look'd, he ran, he smiled. 
And threw his arms around the neck 
Of his rebellious child. 



6 Father, I've sinn'd, but O forgive . 

And thus the father said ; 
Hejoice, my house ! my son's alive, 
For whom I moum'd as dead. 

7 Now let the Vted calf be slain, 

Go sp f<d the news abroad. 

My son was ocad, but lives again. 

Was lost, but now is found. 

8 Tis thus (he Lord himself reveals, 

To call poor sinners home , 
More than the father's love Yt feela, 
\nd bids the sinner uoiae 






SOLEMN THOUGHT. 12,9, 12, 12, y 



F. Price. 



29 






3;zu ,^ (* 



EF 



EE^ 






if^ 



P ^~°~ T ^F^ :^gEfe^=jf^J=jJz: P-^^ ^E^^^ 



m 



Ra . member, sinful youth, you must die, you must die, Re -, member, sinful youth, you must die ; R» member, sinful 



:S 



^ 



^^ 



3 



p-p^ 



E^^ 



:e=t=t 



# 



^1^^^ 



^^p- 



:B=Pi 



l^^^P^ ^^ ^ 



3=5 



jj-g~]" 



youth, who hate the way of truth. And in your pleasures boast, you must die, you must die; And in your pleasures boast, you must die. 



@ 



[^Eg^g?jg^B^l=PJr-lT^ 



-PH«=f^ 



^ijEpE JZpp i ^-ll 



30 



SEPARATION. C. M 



^wJLtr-— 



?fe 



m^T^^\ ^ ^mm^^m^^ m£^m?^^m 



►-#-»- 



^i^SE:&EESEfe^S^§3gS 






SEE 



;££ 



Our cheerful voice* let us raise, Aad "ing a part - ing song; Altliough I'm with you now, my friends, I can't be with you lone 



„ , ^ ^■^-^•-^— , ■ ■- ,— , -r-.— T — ^- 

hl:^zigz^ Ezp|i£zpp±=zEz|z E£i |-' " b =FF^M=E i£=J^4^3zi|rf ^^ 



^ 



^^^ 



mc 



^^^^tel^S^feE^^S 



EF^S'^ BE^ppFrj^i.^li:^;^ 



HI 



p? 



^ 



1^ 



For I must go and leave you all, It filU my heart with pain ; Although we part, perhaps, in tears, I hope we'll meet again. 



<SiS^£E 



B^ 



& 



;.tES3 



'm 



^^^^^^Hs^S 



IDUMEA S. M 



EZiP: 



="§ 



:a_j_a 



z^-jj 



Daviiun. Meth. Hymn Book, p. a:il 31 



t^^g^c F^|^,E^1^^.^g^E^ gi^j^^ 



And am I bom t J die 1 To lay this bo - dy down 1 And must my trem - bling spi - rit fly, In - to a world un - known 1 



1=^ 



i 



EE 



-Etsv 



i 



ipSqc 



eE 



nun 



H5Ef^^^ 



HE 



m 



SUFFIELD. C M. 



I^^Et^SiH 



EE 



3i5 



ets3 



g^te^^:^ 



£ 



E^^esHEJ 



mm: 



r^-an — 



Teach me the measure of my daya, Thou 



Maker of my frame, I w 



s 




woulu sur - vey life's nar - row space, And learn how frail I am. 

\' -2 



pa:^J4j4Jj^ ^E^^^iF^ : 



rtc 



E^?^ 



=P^ 



E^Siz 



m 



^Sl^E^g 



-P=F 



EZTE 



£fE 



^ 



zzd^=^ 



EE^.^: 



in 



THE MIDNIGHT CRY. 7, 6, 7, 6, 7, 6, 7. 7 



liapiist Harmony, p. 483 




I When the midnight cry began, O what lamentation, ? Lo, the bridegroom is at hand, Surely all the waiting bend 

Thousands slrcping in their sins, Neglecting their salvation. S Who will kindly trcjt him 1 Will now go forth to meet him. 




t3^ 



g^-g^gg^ 



p 



sstggis 



S Some, indeed, did wait awhile, And shone without a rival ; ? Many souls who thought they'd light, Now against the Bridegroom fight. 

But they spent their seeming oil Long since the last revival. 5 O, when the scene was closed. And so they stand opposed. 



1:^4 



T t tm i 



:"^:£2 



m 



Hfl 



WW 



^ 



k=J 



:t3E 



^ 



Pit 



^EW 



sa 



t^^^gg 



if 



^ TP? 



8 While the wise are passing by, 

With all their lamps prepared. 
Give us of your oil, they cry. 

If any can be spared. 
Others trimm'd their former snuff, 

O, is it not ama7.ing ! 
Those conclude they've light enough, 

And think their lamps are blazing. 

4 Foolish virgins ! do you think 

Our Bridegroom's a deceiver t 
Then may you pass your lives away. 

And think to sleep for ever ; 
But we hy faith do see his face. 

On whom we have bclieveO ; 
U there's dcccjition in the case, 

Tie yuu that arc dooeifad. 



6 And now the door is opt-n Hie, 

Ai.d Ciirislians are invi^d, 
And virgins wise compass the briJe, 

March to the place appointed. 
Who do you think is now a guest ? 

Yea, listen, carnal lovers, 
'Tis those in wedding garments dress'd ; 

They cease from sin for ever. 



7 The foolish virgins are without ; 

The sentence, Go ye cursed — 
For want of oil they're out — away 

From Christ they then are forced. 
No more on earth with saints to join 

In sharing of my favour ; 
Although you did my children blind, 

Mourn with the damn'd for ever. 



8 The door is shut, and they within, 8 Virgins wise, I pray draw near, 

They're freed from every danger ; And listen to your Saviour ; 

They reign with Christ, for sinners slain. He is your friend, you need not fear, 

AVho once lay in a manger ; O, why not seek his favour 1 

They join with saints and angels too Ho speaks to you in whispers sweet. 

In songs (if love and favour ; In words of consolatiort : 

Glory, honour, praise and power, By grace in him you stand complete, 

T > God oiivl Lamb for ever. Be is your great salvation. 



9 Dying sinners, will you come. 

The Saviour now invites you ; 
His bleeding wounds proclaim there's 

Let nothing then afl'right you — [room, 
Room for you, and room for me. 

And room for coming sinners : 
Salvation pours a living stream 

For you and all believers. 

1 When earth and sea shall bo no luoro. 

And all their glor)- perish. 
When sun and moon shall ceant to shine. 

And stars at midnight languish ■ 
When Gabriel's trump shall sound aloud. 

To coll the slumb'ring nations. 
Then, Christians, we shall see our Go-} 

The GoJ of CUT sm vai'txi 



rONFlDENCE. 10.10,11.11. 



Mercer s Ciusier, p. 40; 



33 




: ^^^p=T-?^ 



1 Though trou - bles as - sail, and dangers af - fright, Though friends should all fail, and foes all u - nite — Yet one thing se- 



-^ — •^ 



1 I I 



-t- 



■^~~'v 



^ 



^f 



2 The birds with - out bam or storehouse are fed; From them let us learn to trust for our bread; His saints, what is 



iPisz 



i^Eii 



| = ^^ ^ g ^p;^|a^^^^^j^P5 



cures us, what - ev - er be - tide. The Scripture as - sures us the Lord will provide. 




, - ting shall ne'er bo de - nied, So long as 'tis written, the Lord will pro - vide. 



&E--m& 



O — T 



^^^HkS 



3 Wc may, like the ships, by tempests be toss'd 
On perilous deeps, hut cannot lie lost : 
Though Satan enraij'es the wind and tlie tide, 
Thu uroni'w) en^ge< the Lord will provide 

5 



4 His call we obey, like Abram of old, 

Not knowing our way, but faith makes us bold ; 
For though we are strangers, we have a good guide, 
And trust, in nil dangers, the Lord will provide. 



5 When Satan appears to stop up our path, 
And fill us with fears, we triumph by faith ; 
He cannot take from us, though oft he has tried. 
This heart-cheering promise, the Lord will provide 

6 He tells us we're weak, our hope is in vain ; 
The good that we seek we ne'er shall obtain ; 
But when such suggestions our spirits have plied, 
This answers all questions, the Lord will provida. 

7 No strength of our own, or goodness we claim ; 
Yet since we have known the Saviour's great name. 
In this our strong tow'r for safety we hide ; 

The Lord is our pow'r, the Lord will provide. 

8 When life sinks apace, and death is in view. 
This word of his grace shall comfort us through : 
No fearing or doubting with Christ on our side. 
We hope to die shouting, the Lord will provide 



:^4 



VERNON. L. M 



r'/iapin. 




Methodist Hvmn i5onk. n. 77. 



^^^ 



i^^kSii 



Come, thou travel - ler unknown, Whom still I holJ, but cannot see, f ,,,.., ., „ ■ i » . . . . , , •„ u ■ ,_ /• , 

My company before is gone. And I !im left alone with thee ; $ ^^"^ '^"^ *" '"^^' ' "''^" '" "*y' ^""^ '"''"'"" "" ""^ '"^ "^ "^"y- 






i^g^^ES^Eiyi 



J I neeJ not tell thee who I am ; 

My misery and sin declare ; 
Thyself hast call'd me by my name, 

Look on thy hands r>jid read it there. 
But who, I ask thee, who art thou 7 
Tell rae thy name, and ti;ll me now. 



3 In vain thou slrugglest to get frcp, 
I never will unloose my hold ; 
Art thou the man who died for rae 1 

The secret of thy hivo unfold: 
Wrestling, I will not let theo go, 
Till I thy name, thy nature know. 



4 Wilt thou not yet to me reveal 

Thy new, unutterable name I 

Tell me, I still beseech thee, tell ; 

To know it now resolved I am : 

Wrestling, I will not let thee go, 

Till I thy name, thy n.ituic know. 



IMANDRA NEW. ll's. 



5 What though my shrinking flesh com- 
And rnurmur to contend so long, [plain, 
I rise superior to my pain ; 

When I am weak, then I am strong ! 
And \^ien my all of strength shall fail, 
I shall with the God-man prevail. 



Lover Selection, p. 196. 



^SseSSE 




Farewell, my dear brethren, the time is a' hand. 



When we must be parted from this social band : 
B ^,* 



Our several engagement* now call us away. 



Our parting is needful, and we intrt obey. 



S^^^ig^^]^Sp^S^S#^^^SII 



CROSS OF CHRIST. C.M.D. 



L. P. Breedlove. 



35 



Sssi 



f-p-^-j gr 



t^SE 



JT^rT 



^^^^^7;jj|f7fffr^ 



^ j:=^m r r ^ rn "^ J J y PT r *t^ fe 



^ 



S 



P 






^5=^ 



The cros? of ChHst in-spires my heart, To sing re-deem-ing grace ; \ 
A - wake, my soul, and bear a part In my Re-deemer's praise./ 



Oh, who can be compared to him Who died up -on the tree? 



-^rng" 



5 



This is my dear de - lightful theme. That Je-sug died for me 



PARTING FRIENDS. 8, 7 



^s^^p^^if 



g^^^^g^^^^^^i^^^gp^ 




ESil^^^f^jSl^ 



Farewell, my lovely friends, farewell. We must be separated, ? O let not this our friendship chill, Though mountains rise between us. May truth and justice guide our will. 
In different regions we must dwell, Distantly situated. 5 (And (Jod from evil screen ' 



99 



THE «50LD1ER'S RETURN. 8. 7 






^FPffl^-F^g^ 



Hh* 



gm 



4 



F^gz^b^pj^^gEJIfeg^ 



1 Bright scenes of glory strike my sense, And all my pas - sions cap - ture ;? ti- • > j^ni 

E - ternal beauties round me shine, In - fusing warm - est rap^- ture. 5 I Uve in plcsares deep and fuU, In 



^^"^g^P^ ^-=t4gEpE| ^£J 



:nj 



ff 



-s-a— P F- 



i1 



J^ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Sis 



^i^fe^ 



^n^ 



THE CHRiSTIAN WARFARE. 



12, 11, 11, J I, 12. 11. 



.37 




I find myself placed in a state of probation, Which God has commanded us well to improve, 7 
And I am resolved to regard all his precepts. And on in the way of obedience to move. J 



£e 



^Etaj: 



33iff: 



S: 



s?s 



-3-f8- 



I know I must go through great tribulation. 



±^^ 



E 



fe 



^^m^ t 




And many sore conflicts on ev - e - ry hand ; 



o-i r ^ 



4^P^^ 



_j — ^j_( — , — . . — , — p — 1_-^ — , — _^ ^ — ^ j_| j— 

But grace will support and comfort my spi - rit. And I shall be able for ever to stand. 



-K->^ 



£ 



F 



t£= 



S 



gppH 




I 



L 



■HS 



8 I'm call'd to contend with the powers of darkness, 

And many sore conflicts I have to pass through ; 
O Jesus, be with me in every battle, 

And help me mv enemies all to subdue ; 
If thou, gracious Lord, will only be with me. 

To aid and direct me, then all will be right; 
Ap.il;von. with all his jjowerful forces, 

III tljv name aftd Uiy fn.u^h J si,au soon put to flieht 



-| — I r 



3 And when I must cross the cold stream of Jordan, 

I'll bid all my sorrows a final adicu, 
And hasten away to the land of sweet Canaan, 

Where, Christians, I hope I shall there meet with you, 
That rest into which ray soul shall then enter. 

Is perfectly glorious, and never shall end — 
A rest of exemption from warfare and labour, 

A rest in tbe hosom of lesus. mv friend. 



4 And more than exemption from Pghting and Laidship 

My gracious Redeemer will grant unto me ; 
A portion of bliss he has promised to give me. 

And true to that promise he surely will be 
Yes, I shall receive and always inherit 

A happy reception and truly divints. 
For wnich all the praises and glorv. mv iSaviour 

Areil.ie tir*o thee, ajiu sluil. tiv*<r cm tnma. 



RESIGNATION. C. M. 




m 



r ^ Ca- 



■I 



-?^-^=)s 



a _ r. 



r~g?~ 



a^n 



^ 



back, When I for - sake his ways, And leads me, for his mer - cy's sake, In paths of truth and grare. 



b^fei 



is: 



^ 



'2.. AVhen I walk thro' the shades of death 

Tliy presence is my stay ; 
One word of thy supporting breath 

Drives all my fears away. 
Thy hand, in sight of all my foes, 

Uoth still my table spread ; 
Jly cup with blessings overflows, 

Thine oil anoints my head. 

3. The sure provisions of my God 

Attend me all my days ; 
may thy house be mine abode. 

And all my work be praise ! 
There would I find a settled rest, 

(While others go and come,) 
No more a stranger, nor a guest; 

But like a child at home. 



BOZKAH Sillies"! 



S9 




i_^i 



^Spr^f 



•^ 



^ 



ffFj f^pB^^ Sp "^fjl 



Who is this that comes from far, With his garments dipp'd in blood, ') I that reign in righteousness. Mighty to redeem your race, 

Strong, triumphant traveller — Is he man, or is he God ? ) _»_ Son of God and man I am ; Jesus is your Saviour's name. 



^^I 



eF=*q=^ 



'^ 



.Pi* 



FiSSfi 



-K*, 



=F 



» ♦ # m'r 



h^^^^^^^M 



UNION 




From whence does this union arise, That hatred is conquer'd by love 1 It fastens our souls with such ties, That distance and time can't remove. 



I 



r- n ■■ 12 



3-- 



3 



ria:f*-:Ff»- 



>-.-f»- 



3 It cannot in Eden be foimd, 
Nor yet ic Varadise lost ; 
grows on Immanuel's ground, 
And JcsuV ceat blood it did cost 



3 My friends once so dear unto me. 
Our souls so united in love : 
Where Jesus is gone we shall be 
In vonder bleRt mansions above. 



4 With Jesus we ever shall reign. 
And all his bright glory shall set. 
Singing hallelujahs. Amen • 
Arnen 1 even so Wi it h« 



40 



DETROIT. C M 



Bradshaw. 



Baptist Harmony, p. 139 






1 Do not I love thee, O my LorJ \ Behold my heart, and see : 



'^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



ii 



And turn each cursed idol 



out, Tha Cares to rival 



2 Do not I love thee from my soul 1 7'hcn let me nothing Jove ; Dead be my heart to every joy, AVhen Jesus cannot move. 




3 Is not thy name melodious still, To mine attentive car ? 



Doth not each pulse with pleasure bound. My Saviour's voice to hear? 



4 Hast thou a lamb in all thy flock, 
1 would disdani to feed t 
Hast thou a foe l»efore whose face 
I fear thy cause to plead 1 



5 Would not my ardent spirit vie, 6 Would not my heart pour forth its blood 7 Thou know'st I love thee, dearest LorJ • 

With angels round thy throne. In honour of thy name. But, O ! I long to soar. 

To execute ihy sacred will, And challenge the cold hand of death Far from the sphere of mortal joyg, 

And make thy glory known 1 To damp th' immortal Uame ! And learn to love thee more. 



HAPPINESS. C. ]\i 



^ZjSZ : -L —^rgrg— r — i i ^r£a -wrP i 






ii=F 






PSeS^^ 



Ne mure beneath th' op - pressive band Of ty - ran - iiy we mourn. 



Be - hold, 1 



smil - ing, hap - py land. That freedom calls Uer own. 



■Si} 



I 



:ii.i: 



THE SPIRITUAL SAILOR. 7, 6. 



4— t 



? 



fzff: 



jzr. 



1. Neighbours. Dover Selection, p. 133. 



4« 



g^^| ^:^^P ^±fe i -T:C^ g^;^i^g^gp ^ 



1 The people called Christians Have many things to tell About the land of Canaan, Where saints and angels dwell ; But here a dismal ocean, Enclosing them a 




T FfteEE^E^| ^^ ^^g£EJ g|^ 



2 Many have been impatient To work their passage through. And with united wisdom Have tried what they could do ; But vessels built by human skill Have never saikd 



■?t!^ 



S^^^^S^^S 



f^f^ ^JJF^I 



feg^PP 



^Sg 



¥: 



s 



1 r 

round, W ith its tides, still divides Them from Canaan's happy ground. 




far, Till we found them aground On some dreadful, sandy bar. 



^^^^i^E 



ann 



i 



3 The everlasting gospel 

Hath launch'd the deep at last 
Behold the sails expanded 

Around the tow'ring mast ! 
Along the deck in order. 

The joyful sailors stand. 
Crying, " Ho ! — here we go 

To Immanuel's happy land 

4 We're now on the wide ocean 

We bid the world farewell ! 
And though where we shall anchor 

No human tongue can tell ; 
About our future destiny 

There need be no debate. 
While we ride on the tide. 

With our Cautain and his Mata. 



6 To those who are spectators 

What anguish must ensue. 
To hear theb old companions 

Bid them a last adieu ! 
The pleasures of your paradise 

No more our hearts invite ; 
We will sail— you may rail, 

Wc shall soon be out of sighL 

6 The passengers united 

In order, peace, and love ; — 
The wind is in our favour. 

How swiftly do we move ! 
Though tempests may assail us. 

And raging billows roar. 
We will sweep through the deep, 

Till we reach fair Canaan's shoia. 



a 



JEFFERSON. 8.7. 






-^■ 



oazzia: 



^^^^^^^^^ 



gf^^p 



i^^^^^E^if^^^S^l^^^l^i 



fcgz»— ^ 



-4^ 



(jljrious things jf itiee are spo - ken, Zi - on, ci - ly of our God ! 1 ,,,. . , ^ < „ j i 

He whose word :an neer be bro - ken, Form'dlhee fo> his cwu a - bode. 5 "^'"^ ^ ' '» • ""'° ' "*" rar - round - ed. 






^ # ^r- l =n ^ 



^ 



fg 



^t£ 



^^!^ 



SEE 



S^^^fSE 



^ 



B^t 



JlIZLIir 



^: 



^f^^^^ 



^^ 



I'hot^ mayst smile at all thy foes ; On the Rock of a - ges found - cd, Who can ehake thy sure re - pcse ! 



ifcr-; 



Eg!£ 



^^^1^ 



pcse \ 



THE TURTLE DOVE. L. M. 



Dover Selection, p. 164 



48 



^e?. 




Hark ! don t you hear the turtle dove, The token of redeeming love t 7 n 'r- u .i. . -i i ti . i. r o • > i ■ ot -i 

^^ un . uii u .u 1 Tu • ui.> • 11 u 1 >■ O Zion, hear the turtle dovc, 1 be token of your Saviour 6 love ! She comes the 

From hill to hill we hear the sound, The neighb ring valleys echo round. 3 w"ic= "«> 



tfe- S-=t-M ^P=tirrr P^^^ 



:^ 



_L. 



^^^^^g^ 



^ ^m-mmm. 




^^s 



desert land to eheer, And welcome in the jubil - year. 



^%-^ip^^ 



t^-j^ff^^^ 



^^S 



2 The winter's past, the rain is o'er, 
We fee! the chilling winds no more ; 
The spring is come ; how sweet the view, 
All things appear divinely new. 

On Zion's mount the watchmen cry, 
" The resurrection's drawing nigh :" 
Behold, the nations from abroad. 
Are flocking to the mount of God. 

3 The trumpet sounds, botn far and nigh ; 
O sinners, turn I why will ye die ? 
How can you spurn the gospel charms ' 
Enlist with Christ, gird on your arms. 
These are the days that were foretold, 
In ancient times, by prophets old : 
They long'd to see this glorious light, 
R'lt all h<ive <li«.I withniit the eiahU 



4 The latter days on ns have come, 
And fugitives aie flocking home; 
Behold them crowd the gospel road. 
All pressing to the mount of God. 
O yes ! and I will join that band. 

Now hoe's my heart, and here's my hand 
With Satan's band no more I'll be. 
But fight for Christ and Uberty. 

5 His banner soon will be ui^url'd. 
And he will come to judge the world; 
On Zion's mountain we shall stand, 
In Canaan's fair, celestial land. 
When sun and moon shili darten'd be. 
And flames consume the land and sea. 
When worlds on worlds together blaze. 
We'll shout, and loMd hosanuas raue. 



44 



M?^m^ mm^^^^ ^^^.^^^^M^ 





^^^m ^^^^^^^ 



While beauty and youth are in their full prime, And folly and fashion affect our whole time ; O let not the phantom cur wishes engage, Let us live so in youth that we 



H|gtt^fe 



i^sgl^g^^^iii 









blush not m age, 
1 



S^gg 



2 The vain and the young may attend us a while, 
But Ut not their flatt'ry our prudence beguile ; 
Let us covet those charms that shall never decay 
Nor listen to all that deceivcTs can say. 

3 I sigh not for beauty, nor languish for wealth. 
But grant me, kind Providence, virtue and health ; 
Then richer than kings, and far happier than they. 
My days shall pass swiftly and sweetly away. 

4 For when age steals on me, and youth is no more. 
And the moralist time shakes hia glass at myidoor. 



What pleasure in beauty or wealth can I find ? 
My beauty, my wealth, is a sweet peace of mind. 

6 That peace ! I'll preserve it as pure as 'twas given 
Shall last in my bnsom an earnest of heaven ; 
For virtue and wisdom can warm the cold scene. 
And sixty can llourisli as gay as sixteen. 

G And when 1 the burden of life shall have boine. 
And death with his sickle shall cut the ripe corn, 
Reascend to my God without murmur or sigh, 
I'll bless the kind summons, and lie dow:> «nd die. 




CHRISTIAN SOLDIER. CM. 



F. Price. Dover Selection, p. 135. 
> --. V 



4d 



^ 



3± 






1 Am I a soldier of the cross, A follower of the Lamb, "i 
And shall I fear to own his cause. Or blush to speak his name 1 > 

1 2 



2 Must I be car - ried to the skies On flow'ry beds of case. While 



;^^^_F^^^^ 




^ ^^^^^^ 



i 



t^a- 



rP^ 



--n- 






others fought to win the prize, Ana sail'd through bloody seas 1 



#>-^"=^- 



iciff: 



^- 



m ~g "»■ — g" 



-p--F>— p- 



m 



3 Are there no foes for niK to face 1 

Must I not stem the flood ? 
Is this vile world a friend to grace. 
To help me on to God 1 

4 Sure I must fight if I would reign ; — 

Increase my courage. Lord ; 
I'll bear the toil, endure the pain, 
Supported by thy word. 



6 Thy saints, in all this glono,.« war, 
Shall comiuer though they die ; 
They see the triumph from afar. 
And seize it with their eye. 

6 When that illustrious day shall rise, 
And all thine armies shine 
In robes of viit'ry through the skies, 
The glory sL<ill !« thine 



EVENING SHADE. S. M. 



# r- 



M^P^Fferfp^jl^^ 



ei: 



Baptist Harmony, p. i73. 



Th- day 



-B- 



past and gone, The evening shades appear ; 



O may we all rcmembei nell, O 



3J£-£p£g^ ^g^E E|^Egig^ gEaE^ 



fefc&--°f^^^[^ 



P P 



l^fg 



mim 



sis^ 



xn 



Efe 



^^^s^ss 



may we all re - meniiier well, The night of death is near. 



SEE 



i?B^E^^|£ 



^-fff; 



-tf^B 



?3=f==P=^-3=? 



I 2 



S We lay our garments by, 
Upon our beds to rest ; 
So death will soon disrobe us all, 
Of what we here possess. 

3 Lord, keep us safe this night. 
Secure from all our fears : 
May angels gunrd us while we sleep, 
Till morning light ajijwars. 



4 And when we early rise. 

And view th' unwearied sun. 
May we set out to win the prlia, 
And after glory run. 

6 And wher. our days are past, 
And we from time lemove, 
may we in thy bosom lest, 
The bosom of "iiv Iovb. 



3EfeSEa 



JUDGMj^NT 7.6.7,(5,7.7,7,6. 



*=fi::3 



B B 



:^ 



:?3^ 



i~~r z r~'r~ 



i^^i 



/*' Price. Dover Selection, p. Ih7 



17 



:L^Ciiia: 



iE^^SFt 



.#-^- 



=^=y= M=Fg^ 5^S= ^^F^ E?="fS 



'JSZW- 



£i^^^5ilr^'' E 



Riee, my soul, and stretch thy wings, Thy better por - tion trace ; Rise from traon - to - ry things, To heay'n, thy na - tive place 



eHt*-«-^ 



^*-» — 6^ 



^^ 



s 



ee 



a^ 



^ 



:EEE 



fcia: 



:P--^t 



^iii 



IS^gE^ 



2^^^ 



;^P^ 



^ziff: 



T K« r 



p ^^i ^ 



MS- 



SE^ 



Ji 



E 



L>z;titif 



Et£:pE 



3riE: 



lb e~ 






Sun, and moon, and stars de - cay, Time shall soon this earth remove ; Rise, my soul, and haste away To seats prepared a - bove. 



3 M^'-t^ 



idszt 






WINDHAM. L M. 



Read. Hymn 158, Book 2, Watts. 




^gN^jJ^EJi^^^^i 



;S?H--5^ 



iBiK: 



E^se 



D~i r 



Broad is the road that leads to death, And thousands walk together there ; But wUdom shows a narrow path, With here and there a tra • Teller, 



I^S^^^^^^ 



^^^^^ss 



FAIRFIELD. C M. 






pii^^SSi 



Come, humble sinner, in whose breast A thousand thoughts revolve ; Come, with your guilt and fear oppress'd. And make this last resolve. 



E 



,-^» 



—pt^^-^-t 






— ' -P-F -I 



^S 



P-F^-^-»-an»- Trr P#-P- 



^^ 



■IMIiP* 



'^pES^gf^ 



THK GOOD PHYSICIAN. 7,6. 



IVm. fValker. Dover Selection, p. 38 



4« 



r^ 



-ISEE 






£tES?ig 



-F=c 



E 



;^^EpS 



►-^^ 



^- 



~o 



s^^i^iii^^SI^Sii 



-p-'(— ^ 



tp^P^- 



IIow lost was my condition, Till Jesus made mo whole; There is but one Physician Can cure a sin-sick soul. Neit door to death he found me, And snatch'd me from the 



fe'Eg^fzfE=feg =^r-t[^rT^^ lii^^^P^F^ 




grave. To tell to all around me, His wondrous pow'r to save. 



^M^^^^^ 



S 'Fbe MTorst of all diseases 

Is light compared with sin ; 
On evvry [>art it seizes, 

But rages most within : 
'Tis palsy, plague, and fever. 

And madness, all combin'd ; 
And none but a believer 

The least relief can find. 

3 From men great skill professing, 

I thought a cure to gain ; 
But this proved more distressing. 

And added to my pain ; 
Some said that nothing ail'd me, 

Some gave me up for lost ; 
Thus evory refuge fail'd me, 

And ah my hopes were croas^J- 



4 At length this great Physiciai. 

(How matchless is his grace .) 
Accepted my petition, 

And undertook my case ; 
First gave me sight to view hira,- 

For sin my eyes had seal'd ; 
Then bid me look unto him — 

I look'd, and I was heal'd. 

6 A dying, risen Jesus. 

Seen by the eye of faith. 
At once from anguish frees us. 

And saves the soul from de^th \ 
Come, then, to this Physician, 

His help he'll frreiy give ; 
He makes no hard couditioii, 

'Tie ouiy Look suid tive- 



5U 



CAPTAIN KIDD. 6.6,6,3,6,6,6,6,6.3. 



Mfjrcer's (Muster, (s. 



^^fepii^igfefefe^F^pSS^^g^^^S^ 



i^feF^^SsfeS^S^ 



Through all the world liclow, God is seen all around ; Sp.arch hills and valleys through, There he's found. The growing of the com, The lily and the thora. The 



^^^^H^i^iS 



l^^igHLfelfeESpElE 




[seen. 



pleasant and forlorn, All declare God is there, In the meadows drest in green, There he's 



E 



? 



^^tel^^^^spil 



3 Sec springs of water rise, 
Fountains flow, rivers run; 
The mist below the skies 

Hides the sun ; 
Then down the rain doth pour 
The ocean it doth roar, 
And dash against the shore, 
All to praise, in their lays, 
That God that ne'er declines 
His designs. 

3 The sun, «o my surprise, 
Speaks of God as he flies ; 
The comets in their blaze 

Give him praise ; 
I'he shinine of the star*. 



The niuon as it appeaiw. 
His sacred name declares ; 
tSce them shine, all divine I 
The shades in silence proTO 
God's above. 

I Then let my station be 
Here on earth, as I see 
The sacred One in Three 

All agree : 
Through all the worlil is OMikk 
The forest and the glade ; 
Nor let me be afraid. 
Thouffh 1 dwell or. the Hill, 
Bince nature's w;>rks docla** 

Uixl i< Uierv 



THE PROMISED LAND. G. JVl 



^r^ 



Mt.^s M, DaTtimn Metli. II. li. p. Hi 5. 

Chorus. 



5EE^-g^|^P^F|g^^ii^E^|gm=^^ff^i 



-^ 



% 



=«=e 



31 



^^^fea^^^^^p^ 



^SE 



sze 



r— rr 



?5 



On Jordan's stormy banks I stanJ, And cast a wish - ful eye, To Canaan's fair and happy land, Where my possessions lie. I am 







S^^Ef 



?=^"^ 






guy: 



;^£^^^^^S^^ 



=F^- 



E^^&E^E^FE^^^^te-^^^fe^S 



Doondforcne pro-mised land, Fm bound for the pro - mised land, O, whc will come and go with me l! I am bound for the promised iiuii: 



^^^eSs 



:F-F-sz-»— P- 



xi:3?=:! 



£zE 



irta: 



:Fif 



3XX 



r-K^- 



ff^f 



f—f^' 



:|izcziigzp=gi|i=z,|}^ 



52 



BABEL'S STREAMS. C M 




m^^^^ ^w^^ 



^ 



e=£ 



SE^ii 



^^ 



,— »4 



^ — "FFT 



p^pBlE^^ 



By Ba - bcl's streams we sat and wept, While Zi - on we thought on ; A • midst thereof we hung our harpe, The willow trees up - on. 



^±z 



:r=^ 



-^^ 



tzhzp: 



SEE 



r-t>-#- 






ms^^g^^^ ^^g^^ff^ 



±zfi 



~F^ 



SEE 



i 



£e^ 



:HEEt 



^^feEi^ 



-p-p- 



tE£ 



-BgE^E^I 



With all the pow'r and skill I have, I'll gently touch each string ; If I can reach the charming sound, I'll tune my harp a - gam. 



.^^i^^^^^^g^^^g^grr^^^^^s-- f i 



MUTUAL LOVE. 7. 6 



fVilliani fV a licet 



53 






; when shall I see Jesus, and dwell with him above, 7 Mn i n t l j i- > r .t n /• • » i -.i. n it i- i n i ■ , 

I And drink the flowing fountain of everlasting love i ^ When shall I be delivered, from this vain world of em, And with my blessed Jesus, drink endless pleasures m 1 



nw 



i^fe-^^^^jEaj^Fj^i^iEEj^ j 



:^ 



££t^SE£ 



SALEM. L. M. ^^ Methodist Hymn Book, p. 455. 

m 



'jsiinr^ 



HE 



tun 



1 2 



azitip: 



:P=®: 



' I r 



^ 



x n~~ _ZLJzr 



>#- 



^^3teSE^^ 



^fB 



I! r 



-fB-^-p- 



icir 



[I |-^± B±yin_qzgid±rz 



iiK>- 



B He dies, the 



\^m 



He dies, the Friend of sinners dies ! Lo, Salem's daughters weep around ; A solemn darkness veils tlie skies, A sudden trembling shakes the ground. 



3=EE 



rTT . 



a 



IZX 



^^s.^^^i^i^&]i 



54 



EXIIILA.RATIOJN. L. M. 



Dr. T. W. Carter. 










Jtz 



— 3-%j— 



gg^s a? 



HZIZM 



V I ^ 1'^^-^ 



^ g^ag^ 



"ii»~6y~l 



Oh! may I wor - thy prove to Me The MtaSi ia fUU pros - per - i • ty : Then my trou-Nes will bo o- Tor.l t n„y . „ .ball for - iret the day when 

To 800 the bride, the glitt'ring bride, C!o« eeat-ed by her Sa-riour's side: Then my trou-bles will be o - ver. j ' ^ *■' 



'^-S--^ 
'-^=^^ 



^s^s^^ii^sfflBa^^ 





^^^1 



JesuB wash'd my sins a-way : And then my troubles will be o - rer, AVill be 



And re • joic - ing, And then my trou-blcs will be o • ver. 



w^ ^^^^^ fi^^w^^m m^i^^^^mt 



p^-^ \ ^^ff?-^ 



CUHiMBL« C. M 



Mercer's Clu<>fer. p. 388 



Em 



C^'pf- 



i 



I I), onco I had a glorious view Of my redeeming Lord ; 5 
He said, I'll be a God to you, And I believed his word. 5 




i^^^^^^S^^^^S^S^ 



But now I have a deeper stroke Than all my groanings are ; My 



in 



.p 



©^^ 



3 () what im - mortal joys I felt, On that ce - les - tial day, > 
When my hard heart began to melt. By love dissolved away ! 5 



But my complaint is bitter now. For all my joys ore gone ; I've 



fe#-Fpgp^^F^r^"^^^|^iSg^g^gggg gg^^i[: 



^s? 



E 



&; 



_ I <T 



mi 



God has me of late 



foisook, — He's gone, I know not where. 



ffi^^fepS 



stray'd ! — I'm left I — I know not how ■ The light's from the withdrawn. 



^^F^^^^^S 




3 Once I could joy the saints to meet, 

To me they were most dear ; 
I hen could stoop to wash their feet, 

Vnd shed a joyful tea 
1 t now I meet them as tnc rest, 

InJ with ihcni joyless stay ; 
A / conversation's spiritless. 
Or else I've naught to say. 

4 I once could mourn o'er dying men, 

And long'd their souls to win ; 
I travail'd for their [)Oor children. 

And ^'arn'd tlicin of their sin : 
But now my heart's so careless grown, 

Although they're drown'd in vice. 
My bowels o'er them cease tii yearn — 

Mv tears have left mine eye* 



5 1 forward go in duty's way, 

But can't perceive him there; 
Then backwards on the road I stray, 

But cannot find him there : 
On the left hand, where he doth work, 

Ainnng the wicked crrw, 
And ontho right, I fiud him not. 

Among the favour'd few. 

G What shall I do? — snail I lie down. 

And sink in deep despair? 
Will he for ever wear a frown, 

Nor hear my feeble pray'r ? 
No : he will put his strength in mo. 

He knows the way I've stroll i 
And when I'm tried eufficientlv. 

I shall come forth as gold. 



56 



KKDKFJMJNG G]lA.C>i. '). fl 



t^_ 

^^r:^ 



^?^^ ^^^^^^^^m^^^^^m 




Come all, who love my Lord «rd master, Ami lika oW David, I will tell, f -c. .. .<• .-^icr .11 , „ 

The- chief of'sinners, I've found favour, Kedecm'd by grace from death and hell. $ ^" "^ ^^^ "^^ ^"""^ "^^^ '' P^"**^' ^^ '" "^ '""^ ^^ ' ''^"S love. From me by i 



(^>H^-2 ^h 



-^^ 



m 



E 



iffl?: 



S£& 



T f'fe'V" 



aig 



ie; 



iF^a 



l-fc 



□ 




2 I late estranged from Jesus wandcr'd, 

An' thought each dang'rous poison good, 
But h In mercy long pursued me, 

Wi cries of his redeeming blood. 
Thoug a like Bartimeus I was blindet.. 

In nature's darkest night conceal'd. 
But Jesus' love removed my blindness. 

And he his pardoning grace reveal'd, 

3 Now I will praise him, he spares me, 

And with his people sing aloud. 
Though opposed, and sinners mock me. 
In rapturous songs I'll praise my God. 



By faith I view the heavenly concert. 
They sing high strains of Jesus' lore 

! with desire my soul is longing, 
And fain would be with Christ above. 

4 That blessed day is fast approaching. 

When Christ in glorious clouds will come, 
With sounding trumps and shouts of angeb 

To call each faithful spirit home. 
There's Abraliam, Isaac, holy prophets. 

And all the saints at God's right hand. 
There hosts of angels join in concert, 

8hout as they reach the promised land. 



Treble b/ Wra. Walker. 



THE TRUMPET. 12's 



J. Willi 



57 




*::& 



:Effl 



do: 



iiihz!- 



a^ 



S3ISZ* 



FF- 



1^^ 



:r^^ 



-^ 



121 



F^^ 



I 






ig 



&2 



fe^p|i^^§ 



s 



The chariot ! the chariot ! itswheel5roiliiillre,As the Lord cometh doiTD in the pomp of his ire ! Lo ! BelC-moiing it drives en its pathtraT of 
-"PP— rp rP <^ ■ lt-l>-rt^-»-i r-O 



^ft^fcggj^ 



^fflgg 



--S^^ 



EPS 



ESeEHEHSEHES 



pjpggggi^ g 



1215 



i£ 



fea 



Cloud, And the heav'ns nilh the burden of Godhead are bow'd. 



2 The glory ! the glory ' around him MB 

pour'd 

Mighty hosts of the angels that wait on the 
Lord; 

And the gloriCod saints and the martyrs are 
there, 

And there all who the palm wreaths of vic- 
tory wear. 

3 Tire trumpet ! the trumpet ! the dead have 

all heard, 
Lo ! the depths of the stone-cover'd chamel 

are stirr'd ; 
From the sea, from the earth, from the south, 

from the north, 
And the vast generations of man are come 

forth. 



4 The judgment ! the judgment ! the throntJ 

are nil set, 
M'here the Lamb and the white-vested elders 

are met ; 
There all flesh is at once in the sight of the 

Lord, 
And the doom of eternity hjngs on his 

word. 

6 O mercy ! O mercy ! look doivn Iroru 

above. 
Great Creator, on us, thy sad children, with 

love ; 
When beneath to their darkness the wicked 

are driv'n. 
May our justified souls find a welcome ii 

heav'n. 



5* 



CONSOLATION NEW. 8. 8. d 



fe^zg_ 



Efe^^E^E^ 



3cr 



=FE 



^fe^ 



fil 



i7 



■ ^m ijf-' I »"■ m, ' h^ ' 1 ' U *- 



Come on, my partnera in dis - tress, My comrades throagh the wilderness, 



Who still your bo - dies feel ; Awhile forget youi 




-E^^ 



EEjEE 



^^^^t^^^^^-^^^^^,^^^^^ 



§?=^ 



^E 



atz^: 



E3=^£F--^BSI 



griefo and feais, And look beyond this vale of tears, Tp that ce • leg - lial hill. To that ce • les • tial hill. 



^^S^^^^te^tE^E^Ei^E^^fetl 



SWEET HARMONY. lO's 



tVm. IValker. Mercer's illiister, p. 2J5 



5» 




^- 



ft> r^ 



n^^ 



-^zK- 



-^^-ir 



i^ 



-^—j* - 



fe 



ffEF 



fisog. 



■P-—^: 



^ 



izis: 



^ 



O tell me no more of this world's vain store ! The time for such trifles with me is now o'er ; A country Tve found where true joys abound. To 






gg^^E^^fe 



^^^^^^ ^^pE^\ 




2 No mortal doth know what Christ will bestow, 
What life, strength and comfort ! go aflcj him, go ! 
Lo, onward I move, to see Christ above, 
None guesses how wondrous ray journey will prove. 



4 ^Vhen I am to die, receive me, I'll cry, 
For Jesus has lov'd me, I cannot tell why ; 
But this I do find, we two are so join'd, 
He'll not live in glory and leave me behind. 



3 Great spoils I shall win, from death, hell, and sin ; 5 This blessing is mine, through favour divine, 
Midst outward affliction shall feci Christ within ; And 0, my dear Jesus, the praise shall be thiite^ 

And still, which is best, I in his dear breast, In heaven we'll meet in harmony sweet. 

As «t the beginning, find pardon and rest. And, glory to Jesus ! we'll then be complei«. 



E^g^g^ 



THE ROCK. lis. 



2^ 



Arranged by Wvi. Houser 
£zr- r — ^-#-1 



1 in MO -anna ftf rt.-«;«f ♦« .^^n^JT'tl __:_TIT1 1 l ■ t t ■, , ■. ■ . _ ^1^ 



1. in sea-song of grief to my God I'll re-pair, When my heart is o'er-whelm'd in sor-row and care ; From the ends of the earth unto Thee will I 



^^^^^Bm^^^^^^^s^^ 



2. When Sa-tan, my foe, comes in like a flood, To drive my poor eoul from the fountain of good, I'll pray to the Sa-viour who kind-ly 




r ^rrrr 



0i^^H=^^f = f^ f^^^^WmrTrnrf^^ 



cryj^" Lead me to the Rock that is high-er than I!" Iligh-er than I, High - er than I: Lead me to the Rock that is high-er than 1 1 



die :" Lead me to the Rock that is high-er than I !" High-er than I, 

3 



High-er than I ; Lead me to the Rock that is high - er than 1 1 



^te 



E 



m ; I d'r 1 1 f ^tt^^^gfr^F^i^ 



3. And when I have ended my pilgrimage here, 
In Jesus' pure righteousness let me appear: 
From the swellings of Jordan to thee will I cry: 
"Lead me to the Rock that is higher than 11" 



lE^ 



4. And when the last trumpet shall sound through the skies, 
And the dead from the dust of the earth shall arise. 
With millions I'll join, far above youder sky, 
To praise the Great Rock that is higher than I 



THE MARTIAL TRUMPET. 7,9. Rev. J. U. Landrum ^ ir. IValka' Dover Sol. |,. 137. r.l 




g^tep 



££^5MgiSEte1 



1 Biethren, don't you hear the sound ? Men in order listing round, Bounty's oflTer'd— joy and pe»ce; 

The martial trumpet now is blowing ! And soldiers to the standard flowing. To ev'rr 

HMt r 1 -T r^i p 1 , 1 r— n ^ r^Pr, 



«g- 



"SpEfp 



ipgg^^jg 



2 They who long in sin have lain. 



^3^Sf^ 



And felt the hand of dire oppiession, 



Are all released from Satan's chain, The sick and sore, the blind and lame. 

Anil are endow'd with long possession. The mala 



^i^&i^S^S^fegg 



3 The battle is not to the strong. None so aged or so young, Those who cannot 6ght nor 9j, 

The burden's on our Captain's shoulder ; But may enlist, and be a soldier: Beneath tiw 




imi^^E^l 



soldier this is giv'n — When from toils of war they cease, A mansion bright prepared in heav'n. 




dies of Bil arc healed , Outlaw'd rebels, too, may claim. And find a pardon freely sealed. 






RsiPisto 



HI 



■'-K 



pP^ 

&E 



>-^r=. 



:?Effit^tea 



DBimer ftiid wrotcclion ; JVonc who on his arm relv Shall bo reduccj to base subiection. 



4 You need not fear ; — the cause is good ; 

Come ! who will to the crown aspire! 
In this cause the martyrs bled, 

Or shouted vict'ry in the fire ; 
In this cause let's follow on, 

And soon we'll tell the pleasing story, 
How by faith we gain'd the crown. 

And fought our way to life and glory. 

5 The battle, brethren, is begun. 

Behold the armies now in motion ! 
Some, by faith, behold the crown. 

And almost grasp their future portion. 
Hark ! the \ ictory's sounding loud ! 

Immanuel's chariot wheels aie rumbling 
Mourners weeping through the crowd. 

And Satan's kingdom down i^ tumbling 



fi2 



LOUISIANA. 8,7 



tVilliam Walker. 




Come, little children, now wo may Partake a lit - tie morsel, ') 
For little songs and little ways Adom'd a great a - postle ; ) 



A lit - tie drop of Jesus' blood Can make a feast cf u - nion 



^Efc 



=^5ES 



^ 




a^- 



W^ 



Eit± 



-^-t^- 



iflLzt 



f±=^. 



EESe^ 



p 



=^FF 



;Bzts 



•| i' • r -^- 



=m=p=i=^ 



13 by little steps we move In - to a fiLa communion. 



S A little faith does mighty deeds. 

Quite past all my recounting ; 
Faith, like a little mustard seed, 

Can move a lofty mountain. 
A little charity and zeal, 

A little tribulation, 
A little patience makes us feel 

Great peace and consolation. 

3 A little cross with cheerfulness, 

A little sclf-dcnial. 
Will serve to make our troubles less 

And bear the greatest trial. 
The Spirit like a little dove 

On Jesus once descended ; 
To show his meekness and his love 

The emblem was intended. 

4 The title of the little Lamb 

Unto our Lord was given ; 
Such was our Saviour's little name, 
The Lord of earth and heaven. 



A little voice that's small and still 
Can rule the whole creation ; 

A little stone the earth shall fill, 
And humble every natior . 

6 A little zeal supplies the soul, 

It doth the heart inspire ; 
A little spark lights up tlie whole, 

And sets the crowd on fire. 
A little union serves to hold 

The good and tender-hearted ; 
It's stronger than a chain of gold 

And never can be partol. 

6 Come, let us lalwur here below, 

And who can lie the straitost ; 
For in God's kingdom, all must know 

The least shall be the greatest. 
O give us, Lonl, a little drop 

Of heavenly love a,.d juicn 
O may we never, rcver stop 

Short of •> full roniinuiimn 



LAND OF PLEASURE. 7,8. 



Davison Sc Walker. Dover Seleciion, p. St. 



fi3 




HE^^p^^g^^^gglp^l^FgF^^-^j g^g^^^^gpi 



^-^T^^ 



zz 



£Ftf5ffet££Efe#£5| 



3 



There is a land oi pleasure, Where streams of joy fi 
'Tis there I have ray tic^isure, And there I long to rest 



ever roll, 7 
my soul. 5 



d 



Long darkness dwelt 



^i^^^^^^ 



around me. But since my Saviour found 

With scarcely once a cheering ray, 







J ' 



wznurji 



-F 



I 



f^^^EpI 




2 My way is full of danger, 

But 'tis the path that leads to God; 

And like a faithful soldier, 
I'll march along the heavenly road ; 

Novp I must gird my sword on. 
My breastplate, helmet, and my shield, 

And fight the hosts of Satan 
Until I reach the heavenly fielu. 

3 I'm on the way to Zion, 

Still guarded by my Saviour's hand; 

O, come along, dear sinners, 
And view Emmanuel's happy land: 

To all that stay behind me, 
1 oid a long, a sad farewell ! 

O come ! or you'll repent it. 
When you shall reach the gates of helL 

4 The vale of tears surrounds me, 
And Jordan's current rolls before; 

! how I stand and tremble, 
To hoar the dismal waters roar ! 

Whose hand shall then support me, 
.\ni1 keep my soul from smking there 

Fioin Pinking dovva to ilarkiiess, 
AtM »o *hn rpgtnnci nf despair 1 



6 This stream shall not affright me. 
Although it take me to the grave ; 

If Jesus stand beside me, 
I'll safely ride on Jordan's wave : 

His word can calm the ocean, 
Hia lamp can cheer the gloomy vale : 

O may this friend be with me, 
When through the gates of death I sail ! 

6 Come, then, thou king of terrors, 
Thy fatal dart may lay ihC low ; 

But soon I'll reach those regions 
Where everlasting pleasures flow : 

sinners, I must leave you. 
And join that bless'd immortal band, 

No more to stand beside you, 
Till at the judgment-bar we stand. 

7 Soon the archangel's trumpet 
Shall shake the globe from pole to pole. 

And all the wheels of nature 
Shall in a moment cease to roll • 

Then wc shall see the Siviour, 
With shining ranks of angels come, 

To execute his vengeance. 
And take hi? laiisom'd people bom* 



04 



OLNEY. 8,7 



Chnpm. 



-#-^ 



->T 



W^ 



4±E 



:P= 



?-H^ 



I^OE 



3iiEfi 



S^d 



lM:^>^=£= 



&-^^^ ^^M^ #^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 



Come, thou fount of ev' - ry bless - ing, Tune my heart to sine; thy grace :> „, ■ , ,• 

Streams of mercy never ceas - ing, CaU for songs of lond - est praise. 5 Teach me some me • lo - dtous sonnet. 



(^HH^^f^ 



^ 



^ 



e^ 



E 



1^^^^^ 



-4^ 



St 



fe^^^N^^^^ 



-P-* 



t-M^ 



>"-f 



g^ia 



^=^ 



^ 



P^ 



-^- 



T=^: 



?5 



±=h-: 



if 



Sung by flaming tongues a bove. Praise the mount, O fix me on it, Mount of thy un • changing love. 



^hF=F -=i^^- 



zfz 



e 



1:11: 



:^=k: 



'-¥=f- 



l^^^S 



THE WATCHMAN'S CALL. L. M. 



fF7n fFalvet 



6ft 



^Ht-^ 




S^PK^ 



•z^^^^fe^S 



^^^j g^^^^ ^^ fe^^g^-^^ feg 



The watchmen blow the trumpet round, Come, listen to the solemn sound, ? Your days on earth will soon be o'er, think thon 

And be assured there's danger nigh • How many are prepared to die ? 5 And time to you return no more ; 




2 Come, old and young ; come, rich and poor ; 
You"iI all be caU'd to stand before 

The God that made the earth and sea. 
And there proclaim his majesty. 
Will you remain quite unconccrn'd. 
While for your souls the watchmen mourn ! 
They weep to think how j'ou will stand 
With frightful ghosts at God's left hand. 

3 mortals ! view the dream of life. 
And see how thousands end the strife. 
Who, though convinced, do still delay. 
Till death ensues and drags away ; 
Will you for fancied earthly toys 
Deprive yourselves of heav'nly joys ' 
And will the calls you have to-day 

IJe sUghted still and pass away 1 



4 1'he trying scene will shortly come. 
When you must hear your certain doom ; 
And if youthen go unprepared. 
You'll bear in mind the truths you've heart] , 
Your sparkling eyes will then roll round, 
While death will bring you to the ground 
The cofTm, grave, and winding sheet. 
Will hold your lifeless frame complete. 

6 Your friends will then pass by your tomb, 
And view the grass around it grown, 
And heave a sigh to think you're gone 
To the land where there't no return. 
O mortals ! now .mprove your time. 
And while the gospel jua doth shine 
Fly swift to Christ, he is your friend. 
And theu in heav'a your suuls will izuL 



♦if, 



"LEASANT HlLi^ C. M. 




Baptist Harmony, p. 273, 



ss^a 



Counipf. ' — ~ #0 • 1 2 O* O iBHS O* '^ ' — ^ #0 • 



1 Religion is the chief concern Of mortals here below ; 7 2 More neccl/ul this than glittering wealth, Nor reputation, food, or health. 

May I its great importance learn, Its sovereign virtues know. 5 Or aught the world bestows ; Can give us such repose. 






-=^ 



?ESffl.* 



^'[li. 



-l-p- 



g 



m 



s 



ssgg^fE^i^a 



C^ ^' 



^^ilEEi^i ^g^^ ^ HM^P^^^^Atf^,^^ 



3 Religion should our thoughts engage 
Amidst our youthful bloom ; 
'Twill fit us for declining age, 
And for the awful tomb. 

i O, may my heart, ly b 

Be my Redeemer's throu 
And be my stubborn will subducj, 
His povemment to own 



5 Let deep repentance, faith, and love 

Be join'd with godly fear ; 
And all my conversation prove 
My heart to be sincere. 

6 Preserve me from the snares of sin 

Through my remaining days. 
And in me let each virtue shine 
To mv Redeemer's praise 



7 Let lively hope my soul inspire. 
Let warm affections rise , 
And may I wait, with strong desire 
To mount above the skies. 



WASHIN(tTON. L. ?n 



Mtcndar/. 



67 



^^ ^^M^ fej^t ^ 






Dismiss us 
All that has 






with thy blessing, Lord, Help us to feed upon thy word ; ? j,^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ■^ ^^^^ ^^^ j ^^^ ^„ ^^^ „„^^^ ;„ j^^^^, ^,^ , 

i been amiss forgive, And let thy truth within us live. ) 



^^f^^Mi^m 



S-mx: 



m^^^^^^ 









[^^SEgfe^^^p^P^^gpigaEE^ 






"53^ 



£Ea?^33-iEE^ 



s 




Give every fet - ter'd soul release. And bid us all depart in peace. Give every fetter'd soul release. And bid us all depart in peace. 



±±S^^rzr—z^ 



E 



I — p" 



-^=^ 



^S^ 



;f^e^^ 






-an-B-i"- 



6S 



LIBERTY. C. M 



-b & 



:=aEfEB 



: »~P zj: 



^i^^ 



^^E^g- 



w 



-5=^ 



133E3: 



^^^&^^^ 



±E: 



~- ■^^_c: 



-I— 



E^ 



t« 



s 



^l^^-i 



i=ca=PH^S=3^ 



No more benealh ih' oppressive hand Of tyran - ny we mourn, Be - hold the smiling, happy land. Be - hold the smiling, happy laiid. That 






^EFE=i^-F^ 



F^^ 



.^P-P^f" 



&^Eg 



FEFFEEF^ 



rw ww L 



:t"HE 



t^z 



M 



-J^—s: 



'g i> ♦ *' 



f=^r=r=£E 



E^g^g^iE 



^£^ 



zr^cu: 



E 



riL 



=Fa 






nL 



SECtE 



ppFfC-gr 



i 



dom calls her own. :i- 



^E=§^^^^^^ 



ThiL* free - dom calls her own. 



:F-K 



^IgE^p^^g: 



SOLICITUDE. i]'s 



6U 



^ 






g^^gj^331;^ 



PPp^ ^gEfa 






How firm a foun -da - tion, ye saints of the Lord, Is laid for your feith in his ei - eel - lent word ; What 



4- 



• ii» r " 



^££^ 



^1 



— ezP: 



j^ij 



gr^zg : 



I 



P: 



Bznaizz 



m 



pEE£ 



it 



3Zlt- 



1-^-, 



jEEl E^^E E ^^P | &^^^3SSE£ Eg--:g=^£||p^ 



S 



•^ 



-P==£ ^ 



^ 



H 



moie can he say, than to you he hath said, ° You who 



to Je - sus for refuge have fled? 



fe* P" 



-P 



»• ^ 



S •-^ 



T=e=^ 



a k^— g' r 







BOWER OF PRAYER, lis. 

Pn» I - - I f j^ 



P=^ 



n=e: 



liichcrson ^ Walker. 



^^^ 



-\ — ^ — ' — ' 1 1 1 — r 

1. To leave mj dear friends, and with neighbors to part, And go from my home, it af-flicts not my heart. Like thoughts of ab - eent-ing my- 



i=e=^^ 



^^j Li- J-^ fe^^ ^-Ttrrpp^ ^ 



E 



^tqt 



^^^f^ 



T T 



2. Dear bow'r where the pine and the pop-lar have spread. And wove, with their branches, a roof o'er my head, Uow oft have I knelt on the 



Ejigjqp^i^tttQ pgjk^^Mfe^ 



^ 



m 



=F=Ff 




F?TrTTTr 



^ 



s: 



^3t 



T 
self for a day From that bless'd retreat where I've cho-sen to pray, I've cho-sen to pray. 




<g g-y 



■0-h 



I 



^^ 1 r~ 

ev-cr-green there, And pour'd out my soul to my Sa-viour in prayer, my Sa-viour in prayer. 



Z 3. The early shrill notes of the lovcJ nightinj»ale 
That dwelt in my bower, I observed as my bell. 
To call me to duty, while birds of the air 
Sing anthems of praises :||: as I went to prayer,:!): 

4. How sweet were the zephyrs perfumed by the pine, 

The ivy, the balsam, and wild eglantine; 

But sweeter, ah ! sweeter, superlative were 

The joys I have tasted :||: in answer to prayer. :|1: 

5. For Jesus, my Saviour, oft dcign'd there to meet, 
And bloss'd with his presence my humble retreat 
Oft fill'd mo with r.npturo and blessedness there. 
Inditing, in heaven's :||: own language, my praycr.:|- 

6. Dear bower, I must leave you and bid you adieu. 



1 1 / — I 1 p-i 1 ' — > — [-p — p 1 w-r 0. uear Dower, i must leave you ana aia you adieu, 

G' — — — = — ii~'* T"^ P 1 -^°^ P"^ ■">' devotions in parts that are now, 

I -d-p-T" ^ -J ^J rg_^, t~: I^ ± For Jo.u.-, my Snviour, resides everywhere, 

J I I I ; I I _J i J. L [ . 1 A i_ And can, in all places :|: ^ivo answer o ;>rayor.:| 



GREEN FIELDS. S's. 



Baptist Harmony, p. lyj 



71 




te^i^ 



_g__gH^_^ 



H^irjiSzJ 



^anoar 



?; ^pfi-p=Ff£ 



i^^?^-EEE| 



How tedious and tasteless the hours, When Jesus no longer I see ; 

Sweet prospects, sweet birds, and sweet flow'rs, Have all lost their sweetness to me. 




The midsummer sun shines but dim, The fields strive in vain to look gay. But 
P3 



I^^S^S 



^^fc^=E==z==EJ=EHEfEEEEate 



^^^EaapS:- 



s 



m 



^ 



.^Se§ 



, ^_,,_9_:?z© 



hP-i 



S: 



1 



n&en I am happy in him, December's as pleasant as Maj , 



i 



9^i 



gs 



£E 



K !*~~is-^ : 



:-^EET£S^ 



-rp- 



-H H ^1 



siy^" 



3S: 



2 His name yields the ricnest perfume, 

And sweeter than music his voice ; 
His presence disperses my gioom, 

And make"! all within me rejoice ; 
I shoul-, were he always thus nigh, 

Have nothing to wish or to fear ; 
No mortal so happy as I, 

My summer would last all fnc year. 

3 Content with beholding his face. 

My all to his pleasure resign'd ; 
No changes of season or place, 

Would make any change in ray mind 



While bless d with a sense of his love, 
A palace a toy would appear, 

And prisons would palaces prove, 
If Jesus would dwell with me tlierc. 

4 Dear Lord, if indeed I am thine, 

If thou art my sun an 1 my song. 
Say, why do I languish and jiine. 

And why are my winters so long ! 
O, drive these dark cloi .ds from my sky 

Thy soul-cheering j rescnce restore • 
Or take me unto thee on high. 

Where winter and clouds are no more 



72 



GEORGIA. U. ivi 



l&PBgjg^lg 







^ 






Return, GoJ of live, re • turn, Earth is a tire - some place ; How long shall we, thy children, mourn Our absence from tliy face' 



^ 



^ZDciaz 






^^-; 



i^ 



i=F 



?^ 



^ 



3-ht=^ 



FE 



F5 



^±?SI^ 



E£ 



P 



-F-- 



m 



P-r-s. 



INVOCATION. 7,6,7,6,7,7,7,6. 



| ^^^ ^^P=gP^tpP rg^ ^^^^^SN--^e:^^^§ii 






3 



iEg;£g5^^^ 



EF^ 



Rise, my soul end stretch thy wini^s, Thy better portion trace, ^ Sun, anil moon, and stars docay 
Ri»e from tran-itory tlun^. To heav'n, thy native phice. J Time si 



f=^^ 



i 



grtsr. 



■^^ 









^:- 



Rise, my soul, and haste away, 
shall soon this earth remove, To seats prepared above. 



cEi^^^^ssef^&^ii^i 



LEGACY. 8. ](J 



^^^^^^^^^^^S^^^^^^^^ 



7^ 






l|p^^§IS^^^^^^E^^ii^f^^l 



When in death I shall calm recline, O bear my heart to my mistress dear ; ') 

Tell her it lived upon smiles and wine Of the brightest hue, while it linger'd here. 5 









^=5=^ 



IKZ*- 



^iS 



I^fecj^. 



Bid her not shed one tear of sorrow. To sul • ly a 

-'^— -1: 



L 1 — . I ^ >«• r 



g^E aE&gEgEg|^E^=pzjz^ g=g£^^Ep=f,^^ 



lfc±: 



fa^Pzz^ 



fc^ 



^ 






"ri — 3= 



heart so liril - liant and Lgnt ; but oaimy drops of the red ^ape borronr, To bathe the re - lie from mom to nighL 



THE CHRISTIAN'S HOPE. 8, 8, 8,6, S 8, 8. 6 




fVvi TValrcer Dover Sel. p. 1 73 



1 A few more days on earth to spend. And all my toils and cares shall end. And I shall see my God and friend, And praise his name on high : 



i-^-- 



3-^^^ 






2 Then, my soul, despond no more ; The storm of life will soon be o'er. And I shall find the peaceful shore Of ever - lasting rest. 



i 



.-=?— ^ 






m ^ G ^^ =r- :ci«iK: 



ICISL 



~^^^^^^^^^^4k 



HEF: 



-£E?^ 



Se 



EE 



fElE^ 



No more to sigh nor shed a tear. No more to suf-ferpain or fear; But God, and Christ, and hcav'n appear, Unto the raptured eye. 




-F^- 



.=P=F 



J^EH^ipE^ 



lazsne: 



=F=^ 



EEi 



O hap - py day ! O joyful hour ! AVhcn, freed from earth, my soul shall tow'r Beyond the reach of Satan's pow'r. To be for e - ver West 



^^ 



ji K -^-^-r^ 



E3; 



JtZE 



^ 



3 My soul anticipates the day, 
I'll joyfully the call ol>ey, 
Wiiich comes to summon me away 

To seats prepared above. 
There I shall see my Saviour's fa« •, 
And dwell in his beloved embrace 
And taste the fulness of his grac«. 

And sina redeeming love. 



4 Though dire afflictions press rae sore. 
And death's dark billows roll Delbre, 
Vet still by faith I see the shore. 

Beyond the rolling flood : 
The banks of Canaan, sweet and fair. 
Before my raptured eyes uppear : 
U makes me think I'm altu.Kt there. 

'<i vunder brisat alunle. 



> To earthly cares I bid farewell, 
And triumph over death and hell, 
A:)d go where saints and angcU dwell. 

To praise Ih' Eternal Three. 
I'll join with those who're gone before. 
Who sing and shout their sulTcrings o cr. 
Where pain and parting are no more. 

To all eterr.it?. 



6 Adieu, ye scenes of noise and show. 
And all this region here Ix^low, 
Where naught but disa]i]Hiintmciii» gr"--! 

A iM'tti-r world's in view. 
My Saviour calls ! I haste away. 
I would not ncre for ever stay : 
Hail ! ye hneht realms of endless Jm» 
Vain world, onco o >rr sdicu * 



MILLENNIUM. 12. 12, 12, 13 



W^m. f Talker. Zion Songster, )). 53 



7ft 




m^^M 



fesg; 






E£. 



^«^=^ 



• p^ 



EElEfeEE^£=F 



^^ 



&J 






The time is soon com - ing, By the pro-phcts fore - told, When Zi-on in pu - ri - ty, The world shall be - hold. 



.^— ^— K-j- — 



'^t 



:^—K 



IE:EE 



:^zzs: 



X=:f 



JE EiriZCrrg E^pgEEggEg;^^ 



>^— «- 






:*=»: 



-^^- 



52= 



EEzEB 



rfc-K- 



^ps-Fn 



5=F 



^:i. 



a 



'9 _ ,0 ~g" 



2rza: 



H 



When Je - sus' pure tcs ti - mo - ny will gain the day, De - no - mi - nations, oel - fish - ness, will va - nish a • way. 



-» — 9- 



P^ppJr^L-^jiLj; 



76 



fe^^ifeE? 



xVEW ORLEANS. C. M 



:^^- 



EE 



Boyd. 



i^_^i=I^^^SE^di 



3=d^pE^Ep:*^lE^J 



5 



=3=F 



■ — 9 = — r 

Why do we moum do - part - ing friends 1 Or shake at death's a - laruis I 'Tis but the voice that Jo - sus sends. To 



^^-^- c^zzn^- 






rzzszz&i zrzzp^*! i^i^ u i i l — i t— t 



F=f=t=pf- E^^EjEp 



EpET^F 






:^=»: 



:p=c 



±ii± 



m 



w^ 



■r^, 



ILZZI 



i~ri — I — I r ^'r— l~l~ r 



-ir-P^ 



^^^^^^^eSH 



l^^^lSg^P^gS^^gj^E^E^^g^gg 



call them to his arms. Are we not tending upwards too, As fast as time can move t Nor should we wish the hours more slow, To keep us from our love. 



^x 






hb^$ 












ai!»-^^i=hr3T=EifFp!iiFFFTq^M^fc=t 



:&F£S_-gr 



LEJNOX. P. M 




Edson. Baptist Harmony, p. 356 



77 



^E§gpS=J^Efe 



^i= jzjj=^;z3 =[_j_Jj-J4:r ^-=|E:"i=g=|=^ 



Blow yo the tnimpct, blow, The glad - ly solemn sound, 



Let all the nations know, To earth's remotest bounds. 



l^zijjri^ ifc :!^ 



^ 



yi&^Ete^ 



m-"^'- 



p=^ 



EpE?E 






^^E§EE=g 



:Es 



i 



=P=F=F 



1 — I — r 



^^^eE 



^^=F 



^^fi 



fe^ 



£ £gE|=E£=^ 



r-i^'- 



=9= 



^^S^E^^l 



^-^-p»- -«-p- 



e; 



I 



The year of jubi - lee is come, The year of jubi - lee is come; Re - turn, ye ran - som'd sin - ners, home. 



\§i^ 



^^i^?=^ 



1 — r—r- 



LI I L_ 



f 



" er-g~ p~ 



L-i; 



1 



JiiZpiz^ 



3E=E 



;^p^^*iSf 



THE BA13K OF BETHLEHEM. 8,7 



'Vm. tVc;!kf.r. 



[|is|^-^^M^"^p^=SiE^gfel^iiMl 



^,^jpffe #g p^^p£ilg^ s£P^ [£gg^ 



\ 3 nations all, on you I call. And don't refuse this glorious news To royal Jews came first the news 

ooriie, near this declarertjon, Of Jesus and salvation. Of 




fe^ 



p"FEt 



S 



mm 



^ 



^feiipri fr-rrff'^^'^^^^^ 



As was foretold by jirophets old, 
Christ the great Messiah, Isai - ah, Jerciniah. 

-_p-^Z X: ' r— « rB 



^^zFPzpZBL 



£P=F 



^^^E^i^iEB 



2 To At>raham the prjinise came, and to his seed for ever, 
A light to shine in Isaac's line, liy Scripture we discover ; 
Hail, piorniscd morn I the Saviour's horn, the glorious Mediator — 
God's bleaaed Word made flesh and lilood. assumed the human nutura. 



3 His parents poor in earthly store, to entertain the strange? 
They found no bed to lay his head, but in the ox's uiaiiger : 

No royal things, as used by kings, were seen by tho?e that found him, 
But in the hay the stranger lay, with swaddling bands around liim 

4 On the same night a glorious light to shci)hcrds there appeared, 
Ilright angels came in shining flame, they saw and greatly feared 
The angels said, " Be not afraid, although we much alarm you, 
We do appear good news to bear, as now we will inform you. 

5 "The city's name is Bethlehem, in which God hath aiijiointcd. 
This glorious morn a Saviour's born, for him God hath anointed; 
By this you'll know, if you will go, to see this little stranger. 
His lovely charms in Mary's arms, both lying in a manger." 

6 When this was said, straightway was made a glorious sound from heaven 
Each flaming tongue an anthem sung, "To men a Saviour's given. 

In Jesus' name, the glorious theme, we elevate our voices, 

At Jesus' birth be peace on earth, meanwhile all heaven rejoices.' 

7 Then with delight they took their flight, and wing'd their way to glory. 
Tlie shepherds gazed and were amazed, to hear the jileasing story ; 

To Bethlehem they quickly cnine, the glorious news to carry. 
And in the stall they found tbcm all, Joseph, the Bilje, and Mary 

8 The shepherds then return'd again to their own habiU>DMi, 
With joy of heart they did depart, now they have found aalvatioo 
Glory, they cry, to God on high, who sent his Son lo save u» 
This fi^lorious morn tlie i^avitnir s oom. hw name il t* Chr'si Jeoiik 



THE TRAVELLER. 7, 6, 



i. C, Loxvry 



79 




lEffegfe^^^E^ii^^gg^fe;^ 









Come, all you weary travellers; Come, let us join and sing, The everlasting praises Of Jesus Christ, our King ; We've bad a tedious journey, And tiresome, it is 



^feEg^i ^''.£^-^P^^^E^^£|E^g^^^iEgj^Ep 



'^ 



IZl 



S^^ 



5 



i^ 



^ 



££^ 



m 



&:^BiE?EE^^Egf 



^-Cz?T-rr-r~BzB: 

true ; But sec how many dange 



The Lord has brought us through. 






A-j- 



.f- — 



:^ 



2 At first when Jesus found us, 

iie call'd us unto him. 
And pointed out the danger 

Of falling into sin ; 
The world, the flesh, and Satan, 

Will prove a fatal snare. 
Unless we do resist them, 

By faith and fervent prayer. 

3 But by our disobedience, 

With sorrow we confess, 
We've had too long to wande-^ 
In a dark wilderness 



Where we might soon have fainted, 
In that enchanted ground , 

But Jesus interposed, 

And pleasant fruits were found. 

4 Gracious foretastes of heaven 

Give life, and health, and peace, 
Revive our drooping spirits. 

And faith and love increase ; 
Confessing Christ, our master. 

Obeying his command, 
Wc hasten on our journey, 

Unto the promit^cd land 



80 



PISGAH. C. M 



Loviry. Baptist Haiiiiony, p. 250. 






-B-^,>H— fi- 



-L^c 



^^^^^ii 




tJj 



Second Treble. 



;P-f 



^^giaii^^^gs^t^^ 



it:^'-^'- 



" r z:f~ r 



,F^f-P^ 






:h'-K-^Pi 



-^ — — — =« — ■■_■■■ p 

Je - BUS, thou art the sinner's friend, As such I look to thee ; Now in the bowels of ibj love, Lord, remember me. 






ZOZI^ 






^^^ 



tt!_^ 



if^P-* 



r-^ 



:2e£ 




"-^-:^£e^ 



rp-Pi 



^^^^^^S 



:tl=& 



:hz=fikmP-p-P^P 






■Ff=>^ 



:ji=P¥ 



^OlE 



g 



:^K-^-^^'" 



' 'i — I I gj 



^Se 



fez:^ 



£ 



^-pf-F 



p3E>SSigg?3S 



:P- -©"ttP 



ii 



nt 



.E g~»^ : 



:»^-^->-i*- 






nnzl±: 



J 2 



i 



O Lord, &c 



O Lord, &c. 




P»-Pa— P-F^r^' Pfrp- 



1_ s 



^^^g^lgg 



|g|3 ^^^^^g gggi=^i^!E$ ^^^l^ ^^^[Pi^B 



KAKEWELL. 12.11. 




^^ gl ^^g^ l^^gjl^: 



1 Come, Christians^ be valiant, our Jesus is near ue. Through grace and the Spirit we'll glory inherit. 

We'll conquer the powers of darkness and sin; And peace, like a river, give comfort withia 




2 We have trials, and cares, and hardships, and losses. We'll soon end in pleasures and glory for ever, 

But heaven will pay us for all that we bear ; And bright crowns of glory for ever we'll weai. 




3 Young converts, be humble, the prospect is blooming. 

The wings of kind angels around you are spread ; 
While some are oppressed with sin and are mourning. 
The spirit of joy upon you is shed. 

4 Live near to our Captain, and always obey him. 

This world, flesh, and Satan must all be denied ; 

Both care and diligence, and prayer without ceasing. 

Will safe land young converts to riches on high. 



1 Come, all ye youni^ people of every relation. 
Come listen awhile, and to you I will tell 
How I was first called to seek for salvation. 
Redemption in Jesus who saved mc from hell. 
81 was not yet sixteen when Jesus first call'd me, 
To think of my soul, and the state I was in; 
I saw myself standing a distance from Jesus, 
Between me and him was a mountain of sin. 
J The devil jierceived that I was convinced, 

He strove to ].<irsuaJo me that I was too young. 
That 5 would get weary before my ascension. 
And wish tliat I hiid not so eailvbcKuu. 

8 



5 O mourners, God bless you, don't faint in the spirit, 
Believe, and the Spirit our pa-don he'll give ; 
He's now interceding and pleading his merit. 
Give up, and your souls he will quickly receive. 
6 If truly a mourner, he's promised you comfort. 
His good promises stand in his sacred word ; 
hearken and hear them, all glory, all glory. 
The mourners are fiU'd with the presence of God. 

M. C. H. DAVIS' EXPERIENCE. 

4 Sometimes he'd persuade mc that Jesus was partial. 

When he was a setting of poor sinners free, 
That I was fors;dtcn, and quite reprobated. 
And there was no mercy at all for poor me. 

5 But glory to Jesus, his love's not confined 

To princes, nor men of a noliler degree ; 
His love it flows bounteous to all human creatures, 
He aied for poor sinners, when nail'd to the tree. 

6 And when I was groaning in sad lamenlatiot.. 

My soul overwhelm'd in ft.*' row and in sin. 
He drew near me in mercv, » jd look'd on me with pity, 
Ho pardou'd my sins, «ii'l he esV nJ" relief 



7 sinners, my bowels do move with desire; 

Why stand you gazing on the works of the Lord 1 
fly from the flames of devouring fire. 
And wash your pollution in Jesus's blood 

8 Brethren, in sweet gales wc are all breezing, 

My soul feels the mighty, the heavenly flame ; 
I'm now on my journey, my faith is increasing, 
All glory and praise to God and the Lamb. 



7 And now I've found favour in Josus my Saviour, 

And all his commandments I'm bound to obey; 
I trust he will keep mc from all Satan's power, 
Till he shall think proper to call mc away. > 

8 So farewell, young people, if I can't persuade you 

To leave olfyour follies and go with a friend, 

I'll follow my Saviour, in whom I've found favour 

My days to his glory I'm bound for to spend. 



82 



THE ROMISH LADY. 7.6- 




There was a Romish lady brought up in popery, Her mother always taught her the priest she must obey ; O parjon me, dear mother, I humbly pray thee novr 



ESfe 



»"n6. 



mm 



=R= 









:crpi&a; 



— Cnr: 




For unto these false idols I can no longer bow. 



1^1^ 



rz*: 



:@L 



3:e; 



fizij 



S Assisted by her handmaid, a Bible she concealed, 
And there she gain'd inslriiciioii, till God his love re- 

voal'd ; 
No more slie prostrates hciscK to pictures deck'd with 

Kol". 
Uul -^onn i=he was betray d, and her Bible froju her 



3 I'll bow to my dear Jesus, I'll worship God unseen, 
I'll live by faith for ever, the works of men are vain ; 
I cannot worship angels, nor pictures made by men ; 
Dear mother, use your pleasure, but pardon if you can. 

4 With grief and great vexation, her mother straight 

did go 
T' inform the Roman clergy the cause of all her wo : 
The priest"! were soon assembled, and for the maid did 

call, 
Ann forced her in the dungeon, to fright her soul withal. 
G The more tlicy strove to fright her, th" more she did 

endure. 
Although her age was tender, her faith was strong and 

sure. 
The chains of gold so costly they from this lidy took. 
And she with all her spirits, the pride of life forsook. 

6 Before the pope they broijght her, in hopes of her 

return. 
And there she was condemned in horrid flames to 

burn. 
Before the place of torment they brought her speedily. 
With lifted hands to heaven, she then agreed to die. 

7 There being many ladies assembled at the place. 

She raised Iier^yes to heaven, and begg'd supplying 



Weep not, ye tender ladies, shed not a tear for me — 
While my poor body's burning, my soul the Lord 
shall see. 

8 Yourselves you need to pity, and Zion's deep decay ; 
Dear ladies, turn to Jesus, no longer make delay. 

In comes lie? lav^ng mother, her daughter to behold. 
And in her hand she brought her pictures deck'd with 
gold. 

9 take from me these idols, remove them from my 

sight: 
Restore to me my Bible, wherein I Uike delight. 
Alas, my aged mother, why on my ruin bent? 
'Twas you that did betray me, but I am innocent. 

10 Tormentors, use your pleasure, and do as you think 

I hope my blessed Jesus will take my soul to rest. 
Soon as these words were spoken, up steps the man 

of death, 
And kindled up the fire to stop her mortal breath. 

1 1 Instead of golden bracelets, with chains they bound 

her fast ; 
She cried, " My f!od give power now must 1 die ai 

lastl 
With Jesus and his nneels (iir ewer I shall divi>II, 
find pardon pncsi aj;d ije^ovle. aiid so I bid fari-wpll ■' 



THORNY DESERT. 8,7 



/Fm. Walker. Dover Sel. \> Vil 



83 



l^^g^^^^^igEfe^Jggjfeliggb-F^z fe^B iEI^ 



-6-r 



I iE^^SESE^!g5^^5£SS?2t5E^E^ 



fcifitte 



a 



:?jEfl: 



Dark and thorny U the desert, Through which pilgrims make their way ; J Fiends, loud howling through the desert. And the fiery Jarta of Satan 

But beyond this vale of sorrows Lie the fields of endless day. 5 Make them tremble as they go ; 



^^^^§=P=S^ 



-8 



"a" 

Lnd the fiery darta of Satan 



M 



P^3^^3S? 




-Boi ar-\— 



I 



Often bring their courage io>t. 



11^^ 



2 O, young soluiora, are you weary 

Of the troubles of tiie way 1 
Docs your strength begin to fail you. 

And your vigour to decay "^ 
Jesus, Jesus, will go with you. 

He will lead you to his throne ; 
He who dyed his garments for you. 

And the wine-press trod alone. 

3 He whose thunder shakes creation, 

He who bids the planets roll ; 
He who rides upon the tempest. 

And whose sceptre sways the whole. 
Round him are ten thousand angels. 

Ready to obey command ; 
They are always hovering. round you, 

Till YOU reach the hcav'nlv land. 



4 There, on fiowery hills of pleasure, 

In the fields of endless rest. 
Love, and joy, and peace shall ever 

Reign and triumph in your breas 
Who can pamt those scenes of glory. 

Where the ransom'd dwell on high t 
Where the golden harps for ever 

Sound redemption through the sky ? 

.5 Millions there of flaming seraphs 

Fly across the heavenly plain ; 
There they sing immortal praises — 

Glory ! glory ! is their strain : 
13 ut methinks a sweeter concert 

Makes the heavenly arches ring. 
And a song is heard in Zion 

IVhich the angels cannot sing. 



6 See the heavenly host, in raptu.«, 

Gaze upon this shining band ; 
Wondering at their costly garmenlfi, 

And tlie laurels in their hand ! 
There, upon the golden pavement, 

See the ransom'd march along. 
While the splendid courts of glory 

Sweetly echo to their song. 

7 their crowns, how bright they sparkli^ 

Such as monarchs never wear; 
They are gone to heav*nly pastures — 

Jesus is tlieir Shepherd tliere. 
Hail, ye happy, bajipy spirits! 

Welcome to the blissful plain ! — 
Glory, honour, and salva-tion ' 

Reign, sweet Shephen!, ever rei^n 



84 



SALVATION. CM. 



ii ^|i3^?^^^^ ^-fig p^^^^^p£^^r^-Bggft 



--r- 



P 



i-^ 



S53 



^TJb 



5^ 



— ^ 



ss 



SS^ 



53 



:ee 



^SJ 



Come, humble sinner, in whose breast A thousand thoughts revolve, ") I'll go to Jesus, though my sin 
Come, with your guilt and fear opprest, And make this last resolve : 5 



I know his courts, I'll enter in, 
Hath like a mountain rose ; Whatever may o)ipo9e. 




^^q ^ggajjE ^j^^-piig ig^^^ps^^ f^ 



^Ej ^j^^Tf i^g-^t^i^i ^pigg iff^^F^^ ] ^ 



i 



m^ 



^-pa 



H 



DAY OF JUDGMENT. 11, 11,6,6/7^6 



Mercer's Cluster, p. 495. 



'-EF-l 



' s-»"n»- 



gg^^g 



^sS 



=z±z: ±±x 1 3zii: 



S! 



EiS=i 



pe:^ 



1 rr 



-e?!: 



->»^-^'- 






u 



jli^im: 






^SS 



i^ 



ee 



The day of the Lord-the day of sal - vation, ? j^ ^^.J^. ^^^ ^„ ^ ^^, „;„ ^j ^j , ^^^^^ ^^j j^ ^j,^ g,^,^,,,^ „, ^^ 

1 ric day of his wrath and dire indig - nation, ^ J " ^ ■' i^*^ ■> ' 



1 ^5-^-':^^r7F^^s=^fl^E=;T=3!iiS^ E&ra 



THE SUFFERINGS OF CHRIST. 8? 



Wm. Walker. 




^^^P^|?^"^=^ f^^ -V-^^|S^ 




^^^^ 



A «to - ry tiost lu5 5 - 17 I'lJ toll, Of Je - ous (0 wond'rous sur-piiso!)) 
Ho eaSar'd &■> icr-msiM of bell, That sL^-ners, tLIo ein-ntira might rise: j 

±7^ 



Ho left hia ex - .iU - od a - bodo, When 





2. O, did mT dear Jesus thus blcod, 

And pitj a raio'd lost raco I 
O, whence did euct meriy proceed, 

Such boundleas compussioa and grace I 
Ilia bod^ bore anguish and pain. 

His spirit 'most sunk with the load ; 
A short time before hv was »!aia. 

Uu iwflat was u groat dropi ot blood 



3. O, was it for crimes I had done. 

The Saviour waa hail'd with a klj 
By Judas the traitor alone ; 

Was over compassion like this t 
The ruffians all join'd in a band, 

s I look at him, I pray. 



4. To Pilate'B stone pillar when led, 

HU body was lashed with whips: 
It never by any was said, 

A railing word dropt from his lip^: 
They made him a crown out of tJiorns ; 

They smote him and did him abuse ; 
They clothed him with crimson, in suoro, 

Aud hail'd him, the Kiuf of the J«ws. 



To look at the sight it is grea 



The cross was all colour'd with blood. 
The tomple-vail bursted in twain: 

Ha groaned his last and he died. 
The sun it refused to shine ; 

They rushed the spear in his side ; 
This lovely Kedccmer is mine. 

7. He fought the hard battle, and won 

The vicfry, and gives it moat free: 

Christians! look forward and run. 
In hopes that his kingdom you'll see; 

When he in the cloada shall anpcar. 
With angels all at his command. 

And thousands of Christians be there. 
All siuging with harps in a b.-.nd. 

8. Uow pleaaant and happy the rjow! 

Enjoying such beams ot delight! 
His beauty to Christians he'll show, 
O Jesus, I long for the sight 1 

1 long to mount an in the skies. 
In Paradise make my at>oa«. 

And sing of salvation on ^igp^ 
And rest with ft pMlf ed uod- 



g^^p ^l^^j^^a^p^^^gi ^-f^^ j^^j^ 




ISLES OF THE SOUTH.* lis. 



Wnt JTouxcr. 



-^ *~C^-|i^- 



.">»Ii?~ 



^^^ ^^^^^^^3E?3fe£ge^ggpg^g3^^^ 



1. TVakc, Isles of the South ! your re - demp-tion is near, No Ion - gcr ro - po!« in tao borl-eis of gloom ; The 5trc-^ir*-h of his cho - sen in Icve shnll ap- pear, .And 









=F=F 



j^_^ 



QES 



g 



i — ^i?- 



i — «•-# 




^^=£B^^3EgP=£fePi 



",a-ri?e on the 



^^ 



light shall a - rise on tho vergo cf the tomb, And light shall a - rife on the verge of tho tomb. 



'^m^ 



T*=^ 



-gi— J— f tf- 



F=F^^ 



1 — i" 



2. Tho billows that girt yon, tho wild wavos that roar, 

Tho icphyrs that play where tho ocoan-storms ccaso. 
Shall ber.r tho rich freight to your tlosulato shore, 
Shall w;J"t the glad tidinga of panlcn and poacc. 

3. On tho islands that sit in the regions of night, 

Tho lands of ttespnir, to oblivion a prey, 
The momiDg will open with healing and light, 
Tho glad Star of Bethlehem brighten to day. 

i. The altar and idol in dust o%-crtbrown, 

The iucensc furbadc that was balluw'd with blood; 
Tho priest of Melehizedek there shall atone, 
And tho shriae of Atool bo sacred to God. 

5. Tho heathen will hasten to wclcomo tho tioic. 

The day-spring, the prophet in vision once 5aw^ 

AVTien tho beams of Messiah will 'lumine each climo» 

And the isles of the ocean shall wait for hid law. 



•The wnrjRofthi:*I>ler«wtTe "componea hy \Vm. D.Tappsti. Ksq.. and Funs on the wharf at New Haven, at tho eniharkatKni oflbe inlsFionarieji for the S."inJw|ch Iflauds. in 1?22.'* what hsih (in^ 
> ui^ht In those iKl.inib> ninro tlwt timol '■ Tht* jmrchi-d j;roun<l h:iK lM*cnmo a pool" — "The shriiit^ of Aliiol'* Iiavn, Inrtwd. boromo " R.tirtNi to Gml." The- Ijit^esi cnurrh oa txuth it there; liutM* i/ttn 
iithtfos har« Ikjvu ifi:ou Ut Jcfuu 6»r uis "iuiinritaiirw" — thuso " utturuKwt partb ot the Mirlli, for his poKsessioni" " AlluluLi! the Ix»rd Ood OiuuipotcuC ruiaaethP' — W. U 



Ife^^EfelffiS 



- — . ^^ -^_^„:K f;;__r:i__r,_ 




THE MOULDERING VINE. 8./ 



I, arte 1 1. 



HI 



=tR^t 



H^g 



^ ligm^lpg§ ^iiPIB^^^^g^S|feg^ 



% 



Hail! ye sighing sons of sorrow, Learn from J^^y°^' .'="^'" ''""f • ^ Sec all nature fading, dying ! Si - lent all thi 
Learn from me your fate to-morrow, Dead — per - haps laid m your tomb ! > ^ 



ings seem to pine ; 
O 



i^ze: 



^ 



■P-SL 



:P-«- 



?S 



'S^ 




^^Si^^S^ 



2 See ! in yonder forest standing. 

Lofty cedars, how they nod ! 
Scenes of nature how surprismg, 

Read in nature nature's God. 
Whilst the annual frosts arc cropping. 

Leaves and tendrils from the trees. 
So our friends are early droo[iing. 

We are like to one of these. 



3 Hollow winds about me roaring , 

Noisy waters round me rise ; 
Whilst I sit my fate deploring. 

Tears fast streaming from my eyes 
What to me is autumn's trciisurc 

Since I know no earthly joy, 
Long I've lost^ll youthful pleasure, 

'i'iiiic must youth and lie^ilth destroy 



Lifo trom vegg - tation fly - ing, Brings to mind " the mould'ring vine.' 



iigi^ 



jw^^^^^ m^^^ ^^^^^^m 




EXlfLTATiO?^. 6,G.a 

• 9 



flurupnrep3 



Bs^^giife 



S 



■Ft 



P3 



g ^^^E£|g^ i|gEEg|^l^Sip 



Come away lo the skies, My beloved, arise, And rejoice in the day thou wast born : On this fes - ti - val day. Come exult - ing away, 



\^^^^^^W^^ 





2 We have laid up our lovo And our treasure above, 

Though our bodies continue below, 
The rcdecm'd of the Lord Will remember his word, 
And with singing to paradise go. 

3 Now with singing and praise, Let us spend all the days, 

Uy our heavenly Father hcstow'd. 
While his grace we receive From his bounty, and live 
To the honour and gloiy of God. 

4 For the glory we were First created to share, 

Doth the nature and knigdom divine ! 
Now created again Thai our souls may remain. 
Throughout time and cteruity thine 



5 We with thanks do approve. The design of that love 

Which hath joLi'd us to Jcsus's name ; 

So united in heart. Let us never more part. 

Till we meet at the feast of the Lamb. 

6 There, O ! there at his feet. We shall all likewise meet. 

And be parted in body no more ; 
We shall sing to our lyres. With the heavenly dioir*. 
And our Saviour in clory adore. 

7 Hallelujah we sing. To our Father and King, 

And his rapturous praises repeat : 
To the Lamb that was slain. liallelujah again. 
Sing, all heaven and fall at tua Ch>*, 




DOVE OF PEACE. CM. 



^=9- 



^fff^ff(^^^^^^^=i^f=^ 



Treble byWm. Ilouser. 



89 



1. tcU mo where tlie Dove has flown To build her dow-ny nest. And I wul i 



U 



£1^ 



m 



"I — r 

I this world all o'er, To win her to my breast, To win her to my breast. 



ZT- 



& 



^ri 



-sP-^-J- 



TN= 



p- 



:rzE 



-J^-* 



"^•^ 






_ _ _ _ 'C3~S 

. 1 sought her in the groves of love, I knew her ten-der heart; liut she had flown — the Dove of Peace Had felt a trai-tor's dart, Had felt a traUtor's dart 



~ "T~!~ 

■^ '^ -^ '^ ' 



£S^5 



^^ 



^^ 



f^-f'f-f- 



I sought her on the flow'ry lawn, 4. 'Twas on Ambition's craggy hill, 
Where pleasure holds her train ; The Bird ot Peace might stray ; 

But fancy tlies from flower to flower, I sought her there, tho' vainly still. 
So there I sought in vain. She never flew that way, 

So there I sought in vaic. She never flew that way. 



5fclt.h smiled, and shed a silent tear, G, 
'xo Btx. niy search around, 

TheA \»hispor'd, " I will tell you where 
The I)ofe m&j ^ei. hi, '->.:nd. 
The Dove may yet be icuiii. 



"By meek Religion's humble cot, 
She builds her downy nest ; 

Go, seek that sweet secluded spot, 
And win her to your breast, 
And win her to your breast." 



Chwrful and 



HAPPY LAND. 6,4,6,4,6,7,6,4 



Leonard P. Breedlove. 

TE 




1. There is a hap - py land. Far, far a - way ; i /^ . ... - , 

Where saints in glo-ry etand, Bri-ht, bright as day. / ^ how they sweet-ly sing. 



King; Loud, let his prai-s 



, Praif^e, prai.'^o for aye. 



S-^ 



•qzzszsr: 






2, Come to the hap - py land, Come, come a • way 1 
Why will you doubting stand? Why yet do • lay? 




»G 



GARDEN HYMN. 8,8,6 



[PlEpf^^^^ESfe^^^^^^^^^^ 



a« 



P=S^Sp3p^ 



rPe 



-p 



Eg 



a-p^Et^TEglgi^ 



fcP: 



t^ 



i-EEl 



■^^m 



The Lord in . to his garden comes, the spices yield a rich perfume, ThTuUes grow and thrive, Tho lilies grow and thrive ; Re- 



l^^^^H^^g^fe^^ 






E^^^^^ 



g=i=!tfc£ 



1 i f 



s 



p:hni=p£Pp pgE^ 



|6>i- -O^ 



i^^^^iife^ 



freshing showers of grace divine. From Je - sus flow to 



=EE^-S3^^^^S^^sS 



^±3Z 



EE 



=F^ 



7 — ^ 



JB- 



^ 



HZi 



eve . ry vine, And make the dead re - vive. And make the dead re - vive. 

P-r- 



^^EEtfeFF 



^-^£Pip: 



^S^gt 



CHEERFUL, lis 



a\ 



£ 



-ti-*- 



-P— a— P P— |H 



— H— ■ f»~r ^^~^: 



S 

EE 



a^ 




i^^ 



how I have long'J for the com - ing of God, 



^g^^^SEEg 



Xlfc^F 



^FzMzg 



And sought him by pray-iug, and searching bis word; With 



•| — r 



5 



i^z:^ 



igzig; 



'fr—jr 



-vK 



p^= 




watcQing anJ fest - ing my soul was op - prest, 






' »g gr" 



jE^El* 



Nor would I give o • ver, til! Je - sus hod bless'd. 



-W—9f- 



^P— p- 



'JJ 



FIDUCIA. C. M. 



Robison 



?i^E^^S|^t^^^i^ 



^=E 



ll^p!!^^:?:^^ 



^l^^teiS^SHi&s^S&sS 



Father, I long, I faint to see The place of thine abode, ? Here I behold thy distant face, But to abide in thine embrace 

I'd leave these earthly courts, and flee Up to thy courts, my God. 5 And 'tis a pleasing sight, la infinite delight. 






^^^^^g^^ 



SP 



i 



iK"^^?^ 



3^:: 



Sg^-S^^^g^^^feg:B^^gg^|^^^ 



PROSPECT. L. M. 



Graham. H. 31, B. 2. Watts. 



-3-^ lkrl» 



JZtfZ 



i^ 



g-r^-m 



s 



--B- 




fStffi 



StSi; 



i^ 



Ife-EFfflE 



^- 



^p ^^^g^^fe^ lf p^ ggp 



Why should we start, or fear to die ! What tim'rous worms we mortals are ; Death is the gate of end - .ess joy, And vet we dread to enter there. 



^W^ 
—4^-=: 



-i 1 I r '-~| '- 



TZ 



ft 









^^SSl 



HEAVENLY ARMOUR 



-^_-_ 



Ji_B_ 



fVm. fValker. Baptist Harmony, p. 463. 93 



^-- 



f^ 



I 



n*i'-g:^ 



■tk 



^ g=fH^=^ EpE^ 



£ 



:P=:P: 



EE 



And if you meet with trou - bics And iri - als on the way, 7 

Then cast your care'' on Je - sus, And don't for • get to pray. 5 



W 



e — 



js^fa- 



■■Mi 



E 






-p— »- 



Gird on the heav'n - ly 



^i 



I 



EiizLE^ 



P— F— PLy_^ 



>--P- 



"^^ 

r^^ 



pE gEgia^ l ^t_^-^-, _ lc^| 



u moar Of &ith, and 



and love ; And when the com • bat's end - ed, He'll take you up a • bore. 



EP^ 



StE 



JiF 



£EE^ 



94 



WARRENTON. 8,7 



li^m^^^^^ ^^m&^m^^Mm^^mm m 



^^.p^ 



§-4-- 



i^^^i^&^^^^SS 



:?:P 



:^-^ 



^ia 



Come, thou fount of every blessing, Tune my heart to sing thy grace ;? j ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^ ^y, ^ ^^ , HaUclujah, pmise tho I.o.d. 

Streams of mercy never ccaa:ng Call lor songs of louucst praise. 3 a • j a j j > r -^ 



M'^ 



f 



5S^F,l=£t^ 



:ggF^^g 



t^ 



sra 




WAR DEPARTMENT, ll's. 



Mercer's Cluster, p. 125. 



9f — i/t'^ry - 



&k^ 



'1^ 






No more shall the sound of the war-whoop be heard The tomahawk buried, shall rest in the ground. 

The ambusn and slaughter no longer be fear'd. And peace end good-will to the nations aiiound. 






»;Yy^::^;»g_73^ 






a^-.-M 



::iSi3hrf^M^^>^^ 



'?-^i 






jag^ggsUgPlfll 



b1 



#.--—• 






r? 



CHRISTIAN SOLDIER. 7, 8, 7, 8, 7, 8,. 7, 8, 7. 7, 8, 8. 

91? 



F/over Sel p. 134 ;»ft 



^ 



'~^t' 






I Soldiers, go, but not to claim Mouldering spoils of carthbom treasure, 7 Dream not that the way is smooth, Turn no wishful cyo of youth, 

I Not to builil a vaunting name, Not to dwell in tents of pleasure, S Hope not that the thorns are roses, Where the 



^--0--l^^ 



B: 






:o_ ® 



i^ 



r I w ry- 



ozPzp: xzSzazt 



^-^^ 



^Egp^ 



jCjH 



^"F 



-P-!e- 



'rzsz 



EE 



p: 



a^ 



=E:ee 



^"1 , » ~fE 



^^eI 



"I 1 I I 



^1 »' ~r~i 



iSE^F^^PgS^^fet 



-i — r 

sunny l)eam re poses. Thou hast sterner work to Jo, Kast to cut thy passage through ; Clc- ^ behind the gulfs are burning : Forward then, there's no reiurnuit;. 



^tli'^l^^^ifi^^^i^e^^i^igff 



96 



MlSSiOr<. 



M. 






y?. Gra7?ib(ing Baptist Harmony, p. 266. 



;!zi(?i^GEdz 



i?zL^is 



^^^:^m mm^^^^^^^&i^m^0m. 



1 Young people 
You who in 



all, attention give, While I address you in God's name ; ? I've sought for bliss in glitt'ring toys. But never 

sin and folly live, Come hear the counsel of a friend. 5 And ranged the luring scenes of vice ; 






jE|^ gg£^f_gEgg^g gpg 



^S 






:f^vF 



P-w 



f3^ 




knew RubstJxntial joys, Vn - til I heard my Saviour's voice. 



2 He spake iit once my sins forgiven. 

And wasli'd my load of guilt away ; 
He gave mc glory, peace, and heaven. 

And thus I found the heav'nly wsy 
And now with trembling sense I view 

The billows roll beneath your feet; 
For death eternal waits for you, 

Who slight the force of gospel truth 

3 Youth, like the spring, will soon be gone 

By fleeting time or conquering death. 
Your morning sun may set at noon, 

And leave you ever in the dark. 
Your sparkling eyes and blooming cheeks 

Must wither like the blasted rose ; 
The cofiin, earth, and winding sheet 

Will soon your active limbs enclose. 

4 Ye heedless ones that wildly stroll, 

The grave will soon become your bed. 
Where silence reigns, and vapours roil 
In solemn darkncsn round your head. 



Your friends will pass the lonesome place, 
And with a sigh move slow along; 

Still gazing on the spires of grass 

With which your graves are overgrown. 

5 Your souls will land in darker realms. 

Where vengeance reigns and billows roai, 
And roll amid the burning flames, 

When thousand thousanil years are o'er. 
Sunk in the shades of endless night. 

To groan and howl in endless pain, 
.\nd never more behold the light, 

j\nd never, never rise agaui. 

6 Ye blooming youth, this is the state 

Of all who ik) tree grace refuse ; 
And soon with you 'twill Iw too late 

The way of life and Christ to choose. 
Come, lay your carnal weapons bv. 

No longer fight agamst your fiod 
But with the gospel now comply 

\nd hcav'n nhali be Tour great racvwx. 



MESSIAH. C. M 



Carreil 



97 



|E»-^sj^| jE^p^Ep^^^ir; ^^^^|gF^p ^zfe^^F^ 






Slf^ 




He comes ! becomes! to judge the world, Aloud th' archangel cries; ') Th' affrighted nations hear the sound, 
While thunders roll from pole to pole, And lightnings cleave the skies ; 5 



And upward lift their eyc« ; 



ESi^i^Si^ 





2 Amid the shouts of numerous friends, 

Of hosts divinely bright, 
The Judge in solemn pomp descends, 

Array'd in lobes of light; 
His head and hair are white as snow, 

His eyes a fiery flame, 
A radiant crown adorns nis brow, 

And Jesus is his name. 

3 Writ on his thigh his name appears, 

And scars his victories tell ; 
liO ! in his hand the conqueror bears 

The keys of death and liell : 
So he ascends the judgment-scat. 

And at his dread command, 
Myriads of creature? round his feet 
In solemn silence stand. 



4 Princes and peasants here expect 

Their last, their righteous doom ; 
The men who dared his grace reject. 

And they who dared presume. 
" Depart, ye sons of vice and sin," 

The injured Jesus cries. 
While the long kindling wrath wilhin 

Flashes from both his eyes. 

5 And now in words divinely sweet, 

Willi raptute in his face. 
Aloud his sacred lips repeat 

The sentence of his grace : 
" Well done, my good and faithful sons. 

The children of rav love. 
Revive the scrptres, crowi.t, anu thror.et 

Prepared for you at>ove.'' 



98 



K/NGWOOJ) 8,8,6. 



tJumphreys. 







-»-tif-H^ 



:?: 



=Pi=i^ 



My days, my weeka, my months, my years. Fly rapid as the whirling spheres. 



»T©T 



^♦-^rrkt,f^h>-r.ri>: 



EPi6 



:^g 



Around the steady pole ; Time, like the tide, its motion 






ISTft 






^EF 



^£affi 






5m 



il^^H 



^wi^te 



-jr-— — ur 



533? 



^^ 



-SPai 



J^33rBg^j3SgTFp=^ 






keepe. And I must launch thro' endless deeps, 



EEBEE^eS 



Where endless ages roll. 



W^IW- 



13 



ZZES 



2 The grave is near, the cradle seen, 

H )w swift the moments pass between. 

And whisper as they fly ; 
Unlhinkmg man, remember this. 
Though fond of sublunary bliss. 

That you must groan and die. 

3 My soul, attend the solemn call. 
Thine earthly tent most snortlr fall 

And thou must take thy flight 
Beyond the vast expansive blue. 
To sing above as angels do. 

Or sink in endUiNi niRhl. 



AN ADDRESS FOR ALL. CM. 

-iS> (S*- 



Wm. Walker. 



99 




=^^^^ 






fE^i^^ 



? 



- rc-j-^ 



PF 



^rr 



I sing a song which Joth be - long to all the hu - man race, \ ^.^^^ ,;g . ^^^ j^jj ^^ . j^ j,^,] ^j^i^ij j j^ ^jaije to- 

Con-cern-ing death, which steals the breath, and blasts the come-ly face ; J 



-a-j 



fi: 



fe^ 



g s^fr- H-^b^ ^ sTTi i ji rrt TT^ i 



i^ 




2. No human power can stop the hour, wherein a mortal dies ; 
A Caesar may be great to-day, yet death will close his eyes : 
Tliough some do strive and do arrive to riches and renown. 
Enjoying health and swim in wealth, yet death will bring 

them down. 

3. Though beauty grace your comely face, with roses white and 

red, 
A dying fall will spoil it all, for Absalom is dead : 
Though you acquire the best attire, appearing fine and fair. 
Yet death will come into the room, and strip you naked there. 

4. The princes high and beggars die, and mmgle with the dust. 
The rich, the brave, the negro slave, the wiclted and the just: 
Therefore prepare to meet thy God, before it be too late. 
Or else you'll weep, lament and cry, lost in a ruin'd state 



101) 



EL YSIA N. 7, 6, 7, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7. 



Baptist Harmony, p. 471 



^^^ 



«-=- 



- -^^-r-t- 



^ -p-^ 



^^'g^ ^^- i ^^^^^ ^p pg 



iSiozs: 



:ei& 



P 



l^^p^ES^^^^^^Sg^ip 



Burst, ye emeralJ gates, and bnng To my raptured vision ? t ir. i • d . • . • i ■ o .■ 

All .!.> . .• • .u . ■ T) 1. 1, iT ■ I . I • t Lo, we lift our longing eyes, Burst, ye intervening skies, Sun of 

All th ecstatic joys that sprmg Kouiid the bright elysian. J e » j > > j b , ^i. u. 



Stfirfcx 



£ 



^E^^^sgs^^ 



I r — "^ 



-K- p T 



fi^S^li^H. 



^g^rtiil 



righteousness, arise, Ope tlie gates of para • disc. 

■p-1 



^III 



2 Floods of everlasting light 

Frcejy flasli licforc him ; 
Myriads, with supreme delight, 

Instantly adore him : 
Angel truiii|>s resound his fame, 

Lut<s3 oflueid gold jiroclaim 
All the music of his name, 

Heav'n echoing with the theme. 

3 F'our-and-twenty elders rise 

From their princely station ; 
Shout his glorious victories, 
iSiii; '.he great salvaiio:: ; 



Cast their crowns before his throne. 

Cry in reverential tone. 
Glory give to God alone; 

' Holy, holy, holy One !' 

\ Haik ! (he thrilling symphonies 

Seem, metliinks, to seize us 
Join we too their hiily lay», 

Jesus, Jesus, Jesus ! 
Sweetest sound in hcraphs' soug — 

Sweetest iiole^ on mortal Vigu* 
Sweet4*«t rarol evei sung — 

(iLSus, Ji^us roll alone 



SliNCERITV. ll's 

TrpMehT William iValkcr, 



r^.^^?|^^^i 



f=^ 



bapiist Harmony, p. 178. lUl 



£fe;g|^H5g^^i|g ipi|£^ 



i»^ig 



"m 



n^iEE 







How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord, Is laid for your faith in his ex - collent word ; What more can he say than to you he hath said, You 





Si 



^r--i^ 



-^-^-p 



who unto Jesus for refuge have fled ? 

I a 






2 In every condition — in sickness and health, 
In poverty's vale, or abounding in wealth ; 
At home and abroad, on the land, on the sea. 

As thy days may demand, shall thy strength ever be. 

3 " Fear not, I am with thee, O be not dismay'd ! 
I, I am thy God, and will still give thee aid ; 

I'll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause Dee to stand, 
Upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand. 

4 " When through the deep waters I call thee to go. 
The rivers of water shall not overflow ; 

Fur i will be wim thee thy troubles to bless 
A nd sanctify to thee 'Jiy deepest distress. 



5 " When through fiery trials thy pathway shall he, 
My grace, all-sufficient, shall be thy supply ; 
The flame shall not hurt thee ; I only design 
Thy dross to consume, and thy gold to refine. 

6 " E'en down to old age, all my people shall prove 
My sovereign, eternal, unchangeable love : 

And when hoary hairs shall their temples adorn. 
Like lambs they shall still in my bosom be borne. 

7 " The soul that on Jesus hath lean'd for repose, 
I will not, I will not, desert to his foes ; 

That soul, though all hell shcjuld endeavou: to shtiui 
''U never, no never, no neve.> forsake " 



102 



DELIGHT. 7.6. 



Methodisr Hymn Bonk, p. 32b. 



:£ m:^:pEEE gi^i^:^ 



g^^^ ^£ g^^^EaE^p^^gEgE^^z£^: ^.E^^ 



F=P=F: 



Dkz: 



Vain, Je . lurive world, adieu. With aU of crea - ture good;? aU thy nlea-wes I fore - go, I trample ou thy wealth and pride ; Only Jesus 
On - ly Jesus I pursue. Who bought us with his Wood, i • ' ' i • .> 



gi^^g^N ^-FEaEf EFJEpr^|#:- ^E^ E^^^^ 



■r^i 



^^fe 




will I know. And Jesus cru - ci - fied 



g^^ 



:?= 



Si 



2 Other Knowledfre I disdain, 

'Tis all but vanity : 
Chri.^, the I.amb of God, was slain, 

He t-Tstcd death for me ! 
Me to sare from endless wo, 

Tlie sin-atoning victim died ! 
Only Jceus will I know, 

And Jesus crucified ! 

3 ilcre will I set up my rest ; 

My fluctuating heart 
From the haven of his breast 

Shall never more depart : 
Whither should a sinner go t 

His wounds for me stand open wide ; 
Only Jisiis will 1 know 

And Jesus crucjfKul 



4 Him to know is life and peace, 

And pleasure without end ; 
This is all my happiness. 

On Jesus to dejiend ; 
Daily in liis grace to grow. 

And ever in his fuilh abide. 
Only Jesus will I know, 

And Jesus crucilied ! 

5 that I could all invite. 

This saving truth to jirove: 
Show the lenglti, the breadth, the beiga 

.\nd depth of Jesus' love ! 
Fhin 1 would to sinners show 

The blood by faith alonr^ applied I 
Only Jesus will I know 

Aiu! Jesus crucitiod 



HOLY MANNA. 8," 



More. Baptist Harmony, p. i 



103 



^^^F^ 



^F:gj^?^l£fe ?ft^gg^^^ 



p:^i=bg|iP^-B^ ^^s5 



Eg 



'£ 



3^S 



Brethren, we have met to wor - ship, And a - dore the Lord our GoJ : ? .,, ■ . , .u o • •• nci xi i rv„« i«~., . t> .u «i 

,,,.,, ' ., ,, '^' ,„.•, . , ... ,' S- All 13 vam, unless the bpirit Ol the Holy One come down ; Jlrcthren, pray, and 

Will you pray with all your power, Whue wc try to preach the word. 3 > r ." 



^ 



e-H 



'^ 



S=w: 



e ff^^^ eE 






ctEa 



:P-P 



"r~r 



:?=t 



EEE 



E£!E5Ep^^-q £ ^gg 



Ztt 



m 



^§.i£ 3ii|[a^3^ 



ho - ly man - na Will be shower'd all around 



Its: 



>^ 



fe 



E 



i 



2 Brethren, see poor sinners round you, 

Trembling on the brink of wo ; 
Death is coming, hell is moving ; 

Can you bear to let them go 7 
See our fathers — see our mothers. 

And our children sinking down ; 
Brethren, pray, and holy manna 

Will be shower'd all around. 

3 Sisters, will you join and help us 1 

Moses' sisters aided him ; 
Will you help the trembling mourners, 

Who are struggling hard with sin t 
Tell them all about the Saviour, 

Tell them that he will be found ; 
Sisters, pray, and holy manna 

Will be shower'd all around. 



4 Is there here a trembling jailer, 

Seeking grace, and fiU'd with fears ^ 
Is there here a weeping Mary, 

Pouring forth a flood of tears 1 
Brethren, join your cries to help them 

Sisters, let your prayers abound ; 
Pray, O ! pray, that holy manna 

May be scatter'd all around. 

5 Let us love ou' God supremely, 

Let us love each other too ; 
Let us love and pray for sinners. 

Till our tiod makes all things new 
Then he'll call us home to heaven. 

At his table we'll sit down . 
Christ will gird himself, and ser'^j of 

With sweet raanna all aro'^uil. 



104 



THE SAINTS' DELIGHT. 



F. Frice. 65th hymn; 2d b. Walts. 



-^w^=^ 



^^^^^^^^^\f^^^^^^[^^^^ 



^?EHSE^ 



ll^^^^^SE^_^t^J^^ 






^hdiF 



gfeg^ 



-{ r 

When I can read my title clear To mansions in the skies, I'll bid farewell to every fear, .^nd wipe my weeping eyes. I feel like, I feel like I'm 



^Jizvi- 



:-e---f^ 



££e5= 



-p-p- 



s 



'rt' Br 



ic5i-_::Epigrgz-ibE:_^^ E ^Eg 



±1: 



^t 



tti: 



m 



'J EEE^F^ggg^ r^^^jll^^P 



^sfe^^Siisisii 



on my journey home. I feel like, I feel like Fm on my journey home. 



C^-— w-^-»- 






I — I — ■- 



^g^p^p^^p^ 



2 Should earth against my *ouI engage. 

And fiery Darts be hurl'd. 
Then I can smile at S^atan's rage. 
And face a frowning world. 

3 Let cares like a wild JcluRe come. 

Let Btomis of sorrow fall. 
So I but safely reach my home 
My God, my heaven, my all. 

4 There I shall bathe my weary soul 

In seas of heavenly resi ; 

And not » wave of trouble roll 

Acro^5s xy poaccfjl broMi, 



COME AND TASTE WITH ME. 7,7,7,7,7,7,9,(3. 



Wm. Walker. 



lOo 




Cotue and taste, a - long with me, Con - so - la - tion run-ning free, Con - bo - la - tion running free, And I will give him glo - ry. 




2. From our Father's wwilthy throne. 
Sweeter than the honey-comb. :|[: 

And 1 will give, &c- 

3. ^Vhorefore should I feast alone ? 
Two ai-e better far th.in one. :|1: 

And I will Rive, Ac. 

4. All tb.-vt come with free ^..od-wii:. 
Make the banquet swneter still. :|j: 

And 1 wUl t;lvo, Jiic. 
%. Now 1 go to mercy s door. 
Asking for a littl» more. :i!; 

And I will tivrt. io. 



6. Jesus gives a double share, 
Calling me his chosen heir.:[|: 

And I will give, Ac. 

7. Goodne.sB, running like a stream 
Through the New Jerusalem, :|!: 

And I wiUgive, Ac, 

8. By a constant brmltlng forth, 
Sweettjus enrtli and heaven both.:!]: 

And I will give, Ac. 

9. Saints and an<;els sing aloud, 
To behold the shining crowd, r]].* 

And I will Kive, Ac. 



10. Coming in at mercy's door, 
Making still the number more. t[!: 

And I will give, Ac. 

11. Ileaven's here, and heaven's there, 
Comfort flowing everywhere, :|[: 

And I will give, Ac. 

12. And I boldly do profess 

That my soul hath got a taste. :|: 
And I will give, Ac. 

13. Now I'n go rejoicing home 
From the banquet of pei-fume. :fk 

And I will i£ive, tM. 



14. Finding manna on the road, 
Dropping from the throne of God.:j|: 

And 1 will give, Ac. 

15. 0, return, ye sons ot graca, 

Turn and Bee God's smiling face. :|I: 
And 1 will give, Ac. 

16. IlarkI he caUs backsliders home, 
Then from him no longer roam. -.^ 

And I will give, Ac 



lOG 



^^^ 



^ 



THE PILGRBFS SONG L.M 



ini 



'^S 



^ 



-H i I r i i I ! H i h I ! - ff 



1. I am a stranger here be - low, And what I am 'tis hard to know; I am bo vile, so proue to sin, I fear that I'm not bora a-( 



is ^-^#gFr^^j =ri^ -jJl^^ 



^ 



is 



-i-v- 



^^i 



2. When I ex - pe-rience call to mind. My un - der-stand - ing is so blind — All feeling sense seems to be gone, Which makes me think that I am wrong. 



f 



mn 



I I I — ^~0~ - — h "! — r 



5^ 



±-t 



x=!: 



1 



/ 



PACOLET. 7,6. 



TVm. Golighily,jnn. Dover Selection, p. 7. 



*^ ' I I I ' I I I I ( 



-.^F^ 



r^g^^^Pg^fegi^ggggjgggfe-^^^ pf^ 



Shall men pretend to pleasure, Who never knew the Lord ? "f They may obtain this jewel. In what their hearts desire. 

Can all the worldling's treasure True peace of mind alTord 1 5 When they, by adding fuel. Can iiuench the riame of fire. 



g^F 



>£E? 



'-m 



^@i 



f"r^"g~^'g" 



it: 



221 



FP^ 



ICX 



IPIP-I 



1s&i??SMf 



+ ^7 



HALLELUJAH. CM 



£E 



^S^ 



IVm. jyalker, Dover Selection, n. 169. 107 

2 Chorus. 



^^gE^^^y 



M 



1 Chnrufl, 



EE^^Eg^^i^^g pE^^EggE^a^fegEgE^E^^ 



-P^ 



P^»^ 



And let this fee - ble bo - dy fail, Aud let •<«. anu die ; 7 

My soul shall quit this mournful vale, And soar to worlds on high. 5 



And I'll sing hoi - le - lu - jah, And 



^ij JL -zgzzzg: 



-b^ 



EZZZC 



-— — ^ ' ^ 1 2 t\ • Chorus. W_A ' !a hi 




^^ 



:p=?=F^ 



m 



^=P=£^ 



P^ ^felj 5^ g=P=NE^^=^=^=^=P^=^^^=P=^=^^^ ^ 



you'll Btng hal - le • la • jah, And we'll all sing hel - le 

\ '. I I— F 



jah. When we ar - rive at bome. 



- -P- 



.ttP- 



p* p- 



-s.-- -P— s-:?=LL=rzz 



L^3^E ^3E pE^EpE£ 



g^^l 



tun 



R h) D E M P T 1 N . L . M . 2 verses. 



»f. Benham. sen. 






^gggS-^tfses^ 



Earth spreads, &C. 






fe^^S^ 



Hark ! hirl ! glaJ tiJinjs charm our cars, Angelic mu - sic fills tlie spheres ; Earth spreads the sound with decent mirth, A God, a God is bom 






m^^^m^r^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^f- 



m 



^M 






'^L 



i^teS^asSi&lgl 



l^i 



the hills reply ; 



A God, a God on earth is bom ! 



:^^- 



on earth ! A God is bom ! the valleys cry ; A Gud is bom ! 

^9\ 



;ggggj #=^^^j ^ R?g;|^^^|feg|pg1^^ g|ip 



^ 



^ 



1^ 



^ 



Evening icpeats to wondering mom. 



2r:^^. 



WELCH. 8. 4. 



109 




w 



rr rf ^j FE^ ^ 



EEaB 



th 



S 



ISZC 



There's a friend above all others. 
His is love beyond a brother's, 



:^ 



J,' , h I . i C Earthly friends may fail and leave us, This day kind, the next bereave us ; But this friend will 




ne'er deceive us, O, how he loves ! 



^- ^|-rj=^£^ 



m 



^=FfF^ f^^ 



2 Blessed Jesus ! wouldst thou know him, 

(), how he loves ! 
Give thyself e'en this day to him, 

O, how he loves I 
Is it sin that pains and grieves thee 1 
Unbelief and trials tease thee 7 
Jesus can from all release thee, 

0, how he loves ! 

3 Love this friend who longs to save thee, 

O, how he loves ! 
Dost thou love ? He will not leave thee 

O, how he loves ! 
Think no more then of to-morrow, 
Take his easy yoke and follow, 
Jesus carries all thy sorrow, 

0, how he loves ! 

4 All thy sins shall lie forgiven, 

O, how he loves ! 
Backward all Ihy foes he dnvcn, 
O. how he love 



Best of blessings he'U provide thee, 
Naught but good shall e'er betido tbco. 
Safe to glory he will guide thee, 

0, how he loves ! 
5 Pause, my soul ! adore and wonder, 

0, how he loves ! 
Naught can cleave this love asunder. 

O, how he loves ! 
Neither trial, nor temptation, 
Uoubt, nor fear, nor tribulation. 
Can bereave us of salvation; 

O, how he loves ! 
O Let us still this love be viewi.ig : 

O, how he loves ! 
And, though faint, keep on pursuing 

O, how he loves I 
He will strengthen each endeavour. 
And when pass'd o'er Jordan's riv« 
This shall be our song tur ■ >o» 

(). how he loves * 



tic 



WOODLAND. C. M. or 8, G, 8, 8. e 



>— •— P-P- 



ji^tr -3EE|^J?f^--^-=p^s=^i 



EE 



?^ 



- o p 



^E2^ 



'^^^ 



3-,^=jt: 



^ 



^;^^^^ ^ _ j_ [__ j =^3^=,h^^^=^h=5 =^ ^P^a 3 



^Zi 






Thie world's not all a fleet - ing show, For man's il - lu - sion giv'n ; He that hnth sooth'J a widow's wo, Or 



F^^^ P=^i«^-g=F 



^S 



EEEt 



ir£& 



a — : 1= 



^^^ 



-^ — •— p 



ZIZE 



^3ef 



lEZIS 



ZTZlZZp PzrJiz P -^ r 



i 



EteJEE 



i 



-pp=3=? 



P^^ 



EfEE 



I 



wiped an or - phaii's tear, doth know There's something here of heav'n. 

' F 



gr^^l^ 



;P- 



x: 



|B- 



=£ 



i 



K 



i^ 



ffef^ 



-^— ^- 



l=tt 



2 And he that walks life's thorny way, 

Willi feelings calm and cv'n. 
Whose path is lit from day to day 
With virtue's hriglil and steady ray. 

Hath something felt of heav'n. 

3 He that the Christian's course has ruili 

And all his foes forgiv'n, 
Who measures out life's little span 
In love to Ciod and love to roan, 

Vix earth hath '•m-iwI henT'n. 



MISSIONARY HYMN. 7.6. 



Baptist HarmonVj jv. 33*5. 



Ill 



Trot ' e >y Jamea Lan gBton. 






D:.=n:r-^ 



F§*^HPJ*^E§ 






-i>-»^ 



t^lsi^pi^Eife^f^Ste-^^NFppI 



From Greenland's icy mountains, Where Afric's sunny fountains From many an ancient river, They 

From India's coral strand ; Roll down their golden sand ; From manj a palmy plain, 



bl± 



^-F 



-I'Ltt^- 



S 



'rjzTf^ 



^ 



-^'-^-.^-K- 



te*: 



IgF^^^^Jzlggj^l^^ 




P-^ 






F 



zz 



^pE^ 



call us ti> de - liver Their land from error's cnaii.. 



~i I — r ' 11 I — 



B-rf-a-^-r.-^ 



m 



2 What thnu;;h the spicy breeze 

Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle. 
Though every prospect pleases, 

And only man is vile ; 
In vain, with lavish kindness, 

The gifts of God are strown ; 
The heathen, in his blindness. 

Bows down to wood and stone. 

3 Shall we, whose souls are lighted 

With wisdom from on high, 
Shall we, to men benighted, 
The lamp of life denv ? 



Salvation ! salvation . 

The joyful sound proclaim, 
Till earth's remotest nation 

Has learn'd Messiah's name, 

4 Waft, waft, ye winds, his stoT, 

Anil you, ye waters, roll 
Till, like a sea of glory. 

It spreads from pole to pole 
Till o'er our ransom'd nature. 

The Lamb for sinners slain. 
Redeemer. King. Creator 

In bJi»s returns to reigu. 




SOCIAL BAND. L. M 



^^^ 



?^^?^FP 



-f—a 



^^^^ 



1. Say now, ye loTe-Iy so-cial band, Who walk the way to Ca-naan's land; \ jj^^^ ^ . ^^ ^gj,j^j.gj j^ jl,g field, ■Well arm'd with helmet 
Ye who haye fled from Sodom's plain. Say, would you now re - turn a-gain? '^ 



B^dEJEyE f ^^^^N^- ^^^Ff^^^^f ^ ^^ 



'^=^ 



P B ^ 



r' 



2. Be - ware of plca-sure'a si - ren song ; A - las ! it can - not soothe you long ; | g let your thoughts delight to soar Where earth and time shall 



It can - not qui - et Jordan's wave, Nor cheer the dark and si - lent grave. 



g^jB 



t!E 



n^--^^^^ ^\^=^=f='^^rrm m 



sword, and shield, And shall the world, with dread a-larms, Com-pel you now to ground your arms ? 



P 



m 



a 



tH-ijriby^y 



-B- 



be no more; Ex-plore by faith the heavenly fields, And pluck the fruit that Canaan yields. 



There see the glorious hosts on wing, 
And hear the heav'nly seraphs sing I 
The sinning ranks in order stand. 
Or move like lightning at command. 
Jehovah there reigns not alone. 
The Saviour shares his Father's throne, 
While angels circle round his seat, 
And worship prostrate at his feet. 

Behold ! I see, among the rest, 

A host in richer garments drcss'd ; 

A host that near his presence stands. 

And palms of victory grace their nan. Is. 

Say, who arc these I now behold, 

With blood-wash'd robes and crowns ofgoUT 

This glorious host is not unknown 

To him who sits upon tlie throne. 



6. These are the followers of tiie Lamb ; 
from tribulation great they came ; 



And on the hill of sweet repose 
They bid adieu to all their woes. 



Soon on the wings of love you'll fly. 
To join them in lliat world on high ; — 



make it now your chicfest car* 
The image of your Lord to bear 



MORNING STAR. 8, S. 7, b. 8, 7,7, 'J, 9 



Lowry 



115 



^^fegE^ P^^^^ ^^^^^z^^^^^^Jt^jiirk^l 



- G \ V^ ^f^tW 



S^ffi 



Huw splendid shines the morning star, 



I's stem, My bridegroom, kijig, and wondi 

' I- 



^|EF?gE^-fe^S 



God's gracious light from darkness far The root of Jesse blessed. 



Thou David's son of Jacob's stem. My bridegroom, kijig, and wondrou 



■i— =L.i 



st^^fc 



1^^ 



SS= 



'^=^^^s^ff^^m^ft ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^i\ 



^^^^^^^^^^^s^^^^=^^^^^^\\ 



Lamb, Thou hast my heart possessed. Sweetly, friendly, thou handsome, precious ransom. Full of graces, set and kept m heav'niy places. 



-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S: 



W^^y^:^^,f^^t^^'^^^^^^^^^[^^. 



110 



ALABAMA. C IL 



^B. g|=^ :r^Egj^^^^ ^^g ^ifgqrg:e^fcfe££lE g 



E^fe 



i 



rbose happ; 



Counter by WillljmWalkfr 



,. Counter t)r William walKer. !-■— ■ ^ 1 I 



Angels in ehining order stand, Around the Saviour's throne ; They bow with reverence at his feet, and make his glories known. Those happy spirits smg his 



^^ ^P^ ^^riS^ ^pg^^S^ 



fl^^z^ z^i^m^ ^^f^ 



:B=Sq 



fEte 



m 



I TTie cross of Christ inspires my hcarV 

To sing redeeming grace ; 
Awake, my soul, and bear a part 

In my Redeemer's praise. 
O ! what can be compar'd to him 

Who died upon the tree ! 
This is my dear, delightful theme 

That Jesus died for me. 

S When at the t^ble of the I.orJ 

Wc humbly lake our place , 

■rbe death of Jesi|s wc record, 

Wiib love and ihuikfuUicas 



These emblems bring my Lord to view, 

Upon the bloody tree, 
My soul believes and feels it's true, 
That Jesus died foi me. 

3 His body broken, nail'd, and torn. 

And slain'd with streams of blood. 
His spotless soul was left forlorn, 

Forsaken of his God. 
'Twas then his Father gave the stroke 

That justice did decree ; 
All nature felt the dreadful stroke. 

When Jesus died fur rni-. 



4 Eli lama sabachthnni. 

My God, my God, he cried. 
Why hast thou thus foisaken me ! 

And thus my Saviour dieil. 
Out why did God forsake his Son, 

When bleeding on the tree 1 
He dieJ for sins, but not his own, 

For Jesus died for me 

■> My guilt was on my Surety laid 
.\nd therefore he must J'-J ; 
His soul a sacrifice <vus <itarfa. 
For such ■ worm m I 



Cont^nuee 



117 




^^ 



Bpirite, Sec 



^^^^^^^^ ^^^l 



Those, 



g^^^^^^i gg^^gpp^l^iii 



Those, 



m 



ee£|=^ 



£F=fe 



m 



praise, To «U o • ter - ni - ty. 



But I can sing rejccming grace. For Jesus died for me. 



Was ever love so great as tUs J 
Was e^'cr grace so free ! 

This is my glory, joy and bliss. 
That Jesus dietl for me. 

6 He took his meritorious blood, 
And rose above the sliies. 

And in the presence of tus God, 
PresenU his sacjiUce. 

Vis mtercession musi prevail 
With such a elorious plea 



My cause can never, never fail. 
For Jesus died for me 

7 Angels in shining order sit 

Around my Saviour's tlirone ; 
They bow with reverence at his feet 

And make his glories known. 
Those happy spirits sing his praise 

To all etermty ; 
But I can smg redeemmg grace 

For Jesus died for me. 



9 ! had I but an angel's voice 

'J'o bear my heart along. 
My flowing numbers soon would rateo 

To an immortal song. 
I'd charm their harps and golden lyres 

In sweetest harmony, 
And tell to all the heavenly choirs 

That Jesus diea for me. 



1 1: 



JLIJ31LEE. P.M. 



_ ^--^}-^^-r>-f^^ g ^^'t^l^S g^P^^^p^: p:gg^g:T^^ 



gg!^ feg^g g B^jlfe fei^5g&i^^d!^^ 



Hark 
Free sal 



i^j^^E§i^EiESE;E^l^fe^fepgs^- 



! the jubilee is sounding, O the joyful news is come ; ? lo- l 

ioUation is proclaimej In and through God's only Son : 5 



an in - vi - tation, To the meek and lowly Lamb, Glory, honour, and «J- 



m^^^^^m^ti^m~^^^^i=^^M 



E^a 




mz 



valion ; Christ, the Lord, is come to reign. 



l^ 



-1 — r 



2 Come, dear frienda, and don't neglect it. 

Come to Jesus in your prime ; 
Great salvation, don't reject it, 

() receive it. now's your time ; 
Now the Saviour is beginning 

To revive his work again. 
Glo'v, honour, &c. 

3 Now let each one ce;L<:c from sinning. 

Come and follow ("lirisl the way ; 
We shall oil receive a blessing. 

If from him we do not stray ; 
Golden moments wove neglected. 

Vet the I,c)rd invites agaia ! 
Glory, honour, ire 



4 Come, let us rtin our race with patience, 

Looking unto Christ the Jjord, 
Who dolh live and reign for oer, 

With his Father and our God ; 
He is worthy to be praised. 

He is our exalted king. 
Glory, honour, &c 

5 Come, doar children, praise your Jesus, 

Praise him, praise him evermore. 
May his great love now constrain lu, 

His great name for to adore • 
O then let us join together. 

Crowns of glory to obtain I 
Glorv. honour, ice. 



PART 11. 



CONTAINIKO 



SOME OF THE MORE LENGTHY AND ELEGANT PIECES, COMMONLY USED AT CONCERTS, 

OR SINGING SOCIETIES. 



TRIBULATION. CM. 

:o£E 



Hymn 55, Book 2, Watts. 




2 In vain to heaven she Ufls her eyes, 

For guilt, a heavy chain, 
Slill drags her ilownward from the skies, 
To darluiP*K tire, and pain. 

3 .\wake and mourn, yt heirs of hell. 

Let stubborn sinners fear; 
Vou must be driven from earth, and dwell 
\ lontr rou £> cu tiicrn. 



4 See how the pit gapes wide fur you, 
And flashes iii your face ; 
And thou, my soul, look downward loo. 
And sing recovering gr;\ce. 

6 He is a god of sovereign love, 
That promised heaven to me. 
And taught my thoughts to a ar above. 
Where happy spirita l<e. 



6 Prepare me, Lord, for thy right hand. 
Then come the joyful day ; 
(Jomc, death, and some celostial band. 
Til b.'ir my soul away. 



119 



iW 



V J^ORIDA S. M. 



tfilt/iore. 



|E 3T5E^EjEjE^pE^:^Ep5Ea 



^ 



e 



1 — r 



^^m 



,. — »- 



^3 



iH 



;^^ 



^SES 



"• 9" 



?^ 



liti 



-OH^ 



-■^ 



E 



:t^ 



£: 



^^ 



Mj^-^ ^ 



Let sin - ners take their course, And choose the road to death ; But in the wor - ship of my God, I'U spend my dai - ly 



mi 



iE 



=F 



-a— a 



F^ 



^^^g^^^^^S 



JeS^^e 



^p^g'=r^=^^=F^ 



EEE 



:fa=i=P= 



P 



^^^^ 



:^=t?^--P=i 



^ 



s 



fe^ 



^£^ 



:P-c 






ne- 



£ 



1 



s 



breath, I'll spend my daily breat h, But in the worship of my Ood, Til spend my dai - ly breath. 



_rr 



P^S^^^i^"^"^ 



i± 



-^zif^ 



i3Et-^ = 



i 



GREENFIELD. L. P. M. 



12] 



=^r 



rT^^=^^^r'f?'^"g^ 



z^B. 



^^. 



f=f-'-'^^^^^^f^^^^^^^i=^ 



tfqi=^ 






n 



±:t 



i^r^'- 



?^ 



=FF 



AHL 



&=f- 



P^^l^^P 



Tq 



^feM^Sti 



God is our refuge in distress, A present help when dangers press ; In him undaunted we'll confide, Though earth were from her centre toss'd, And 



^ 



■ja-^ 



m^^^Hf^ 



3=5: 



FEgE^F^EFjS^^ 



fe^ 



zjzir 



—j-p-^-p-a-, 
■piTzrzrztz 





Sep; 



£ 



S? 



^=&i 



iE:^ 



-p- f-F- F 



JFrr rT^ ^ P^^^^^ ^S 



3EES=S?= 



JB_B_ 






-=F=p-pp- 



-f'~-&- 



o • eean 



lost, Torn piecemeal by the roar - ing tide, Torn i)ieeemeal by the roar - ing tide. 



=P^=F 



FH: 



^E 



T^ 



x: 



1*22 



FAITHFUL SOLDIER. 7,6 



(Fm. fVallier. Dover Sclcciion, p. VZu. 



fl5^tg;£g|^^^^^JE^^fep:feFpg:^E^pE^ 



&^^= iiafeg?fe-F^ll^^^^^g:g^ E^^^^^+^(^ 



rhen shall I see Jesus, AnJ reign with him above 1 > ,,r, i, n t i i i- >i r .u- n <• • » • i -.u ti < 

I from the flowing fountain, Drink everlasUng love 1 S ^^ ''''" ''''^' ' ** '^'" ^"^^ '^ ^""^ "^'^ ''^" '^"'''^ °^ "" ' *"'' ""^ "^ '''*'*^ 



|g£^i?g^^;gEg^FffeF^|^pg^ 



"^Fp^p- 



I I I r 



:S0S 



£ 



1 



P: 



£^E 



s 



:^ 



_QL 



"I r 

Jo - sua, Drink enJIcss pleasures in 



^^^fes^ 



2 But now I am a soldier. 

My Cai>tain'8 gone liefore ; 
He's given me my orJcrs, 

And bids mc ne'er give o'er; 
His promises arc faithful — 

A righteous crown he'll give, 
And all his valiant soldiers 

Eternally shall live. 

.3 Through grace I am determined 

To concjuor, though I die, 
.\nd then away to Jesus. 

On wings of love I'll fly : 
Farewell to sin and sorrow, 

I bid them both adieu ! 
And (1, my friondii, prove faithful. 

And on vour way pursue 



4 Whene'er you meet with trouble 

And trials on your way. 
Then cast your care on Jesus, 

And don't forget to Jiray. 
Gird on the gospel armour 

Of faith, and hope, and love, 
And when the combat's ended, 

He'll carry you above. 

5 do not be discouraged. 

For Jesus is your friend ; 
And if you lark for knowledge, 

He'll not refuse to lend. 
Neither will he upbraid you. 

Though oflen you request. 
He'll givo you grace to conquer, 

And Like you hoiiii! t'l re^l. 



6 And when the last louJ trumpet 

Shall lend the vaulted skies, 
And bid Ih' entombed millions 

Froni their cold beds arise ; 
Our ransom'd dust, revived, 

Urlght beauties shall put oa 
Anil soar to the blest mansions 

Where our Redeemer's gone. 

7 Our eyes shall then with rapture, 

'I'he Saviour's face behold; 
Our feet, no more diverted. 

Shall walk the streets of gold 
Our cars shall heur with transpoil 

The hosts celest'al snig ; 
Our tongues snail ch»nt tlie fjioriiw 

Ol our -jomnrtal K'uv. 



DISCIPLE. 8s&7s. D. 




Treble hy Wm Houses . From Christian Lyre. 

-0 9^ 



123 



^^^ ^f^^^ ^ WWW ^ 




z ^ 1^ = = . ^ . ^ — ^ «- J— ^ ^ ^ 

*\ Je - SUB I my cross have ta - ken, All to leave and fol-low thee : Naked, poor, despised, for - saken, Thou from hence my all shall bo 



iiP§ 



2. Let the world de-spise and leave me, They have left my Sa-viour, too ; Human hearts and looks deceive me, Thou art not like them, un-true ; 





^^ne-r-EEi^'N^ ^& gBnrf^iTl 



Per - ish ev' - ry fond am - bi - tion, All I've sought, or hoped, or known, Yet how rich is my con - di - tion, God and heaY'n are still my own ! 



E^^^ #e^^:-fcto£^^ 






And whilst thou shall smile np-on me, God of wisdom, love, and might, Foes may hate, and friends disown me ; Show thy face and all is bright, 



Sg:£^;E£EFgE gEg=^iy.^4 ^ | ^.f! . rc ![>•,': J-rfe^FF^ 



i. Go, tDen, earthly feme and trcapure, 

Come, diyaster, ecom, and pain; 
Id thy service pain is pleasure, 

With thy favour loss is gain. 
I have called thee, Abba, Father, 

I have set my heart on thee: 
f terms may howl, and clouds may gather, 

AJl must work for good to me. 



4. Man may trouble and distress me, 

•Twill but drive me to thy breast; 
Life with trials hard may press me, 

lieav'n will bring me sweeter rest. 
Oh I 'tis not in grief to harm me, 

While thy love is left to me; 
Oh ! 'twere not in joy to charm me, 

Were that joy unmix'd with thee. 



6. Soul, then know thy full salvation; 

Kise o'er sin, and fear, and care ; 
Joy to find, in ev'ry station, 

Something still to do or bear : 
Think what Spirit dwells within thee; 

Think what Father's smiles are thini 
Think that Jesus died to win thee ; 

Child of heaven, const thou repine ? 



6. riaste thee on from frraee to glory, 

Arm'd by faith, and wing'd by prayerl 
Heaven's *'ternal day's before thee, 

God's own hand shall guide thee there: 
Soon shall close thy earthly mission, 

Soon shall pass thy pilgrim days; 
Ilope shall change to i^lad fruition. 

Faith to sight, md prayer to ^rtiiso. 



• Thi^ glorious h5'mn i^ said to have been composed by a younR Knpliah lady, a Methodist, who had suffered much afflicticir,. 



i24 



SHAROJVi P.M. 



^-^o- 



J2;_i 



tf^£^ 



^^S 






£E^S 



^^f^-lff^r-^^ 



-F= 



s 



S^EEi 



:pr 



#-p-F^i 



1 1 1 1 1 LI ! 1 _| — I U 



How pleasant 'tis to see, Kindred and friends agree. Each in his proper station move. 



Each in his proper station more. 



\^t 



:^-B'- 



B 



fs^ 



:te=c 



■p-« 



SEEt^ 



Sz 



SfB 



i^SEEEEE 



K«H 



ID=tf 



SteE 



^ 



:cvl_*: 



^^^^^iS§ 



?=^p::32 



i 



: ±EEfeEE-^fe:^Ei £gg|£^g ^fff^P^'|^gE ^EgE|f ^EE^ 



fe: 



And each fulfil his part, With sympathizing heart. In all the cares of life. In all the cares of life and love. 



-P- 



EEE^tS^ 



£ 



^Ei^i^j^is^iris 



NEW JERUSALEM. «■• 



12.^ 






-4-^ 



^r^rf^^^^^^T ^'^^^^TT^^fe'^-^^^ 



i=fe^ 



^ 



=F 



^ Ep=P^pif'^ Jgi|^gE£F^| 



Myifiaiious Kedeem-er I love, His praises a -loud 1 11 pro - claim, ^ rp ,.„ ,„,: ,■. „; „ cu n i _ . i 

,•',''..,.. , -n u . I,- 1 11 r io gaze on the glories di - vine, bhall be my e - ter nal ( 

And join with the armies above, 1 o shout his a - do - ra - ble name. ^ ^ ° > ^ 



Eg p^i^T^pig^^Ssg^g ^l 



- p • -^ 



^^p-r-^ 



^ 



^EjEE^^ 



m 



^^^xi r~ ^^^ 



^>= 



o^ 



IefeeE 



;p^EFE: 



ploy, And feel them in - cea - sant ly oiinc. My boundless, iii - ef fa - ble 



^ 



'^E^^^^^^^z 



L-P=C 



B^ 



5z3: 



.^CZ- 



:pt: 



l-iti 



SARDINA C. M 



Ei=^S^^E^^^i^^^-^fe^P 



Bs^f 



Kt£t 



IBM 



a 



I^^S^ 



Kow did his flow - ing tears con - dole, As for a bro - tliei dead. And fasting, mortified his soul, While for their lives be pray'd. 



felEEE^ 



#=P: 



H jT 



4==f= 



:ffi 



nx 



-i»-|"- 



^S 



^^fe 



B 



3533 



^S 



P 



^^EB 



I^r 



'^^F 



^^P 



FF 



'-^^P^ 



^r^' 



°-\'^ 



Lord re - lums 



r f- ^ I ±±r:b:r 



They groan'd and cursed him on their Sjds, Yet still he pleads and mourns ; And double blessings on his head. The righteous Lord re - lums 



^P^pifiFL 



_X-9Z? 



TRUE HAPPINP^SS. 0,6,9,6,6,9 

-|»-|^P-^- 



IVm. WcUktr. 



Dover Sel. p '<9 




O, how happy arc they, Who their Saviour obey, And whose treasure is laid up above ; Tongue can never express The swvjt comfort and 



■,-p-r-f>-[f^-f^F 



F r 



^:^^^ 




peace, Of a soul in its ear - li - est love. 



gg ^^^g xggp 



Z That comfort was mine, 
When tlic favour divine. 

I first found in the blood of the Lamb : 
When my heart first believed, 
! what joy I received ! 

What a heaven in Jcsus's name. 

3 'Twas a heaven below, 
The Redeemer to know. 



5 On the wings of his love, 
I was carried above 

AH sip and temptation, and paip • 
I could not bclievo 
That I ever should grieve. 

That I ever should suffer again. 

6 I rode on the sky, 
Freely justified I, 



And the angels could do nothing more Nor envied Efijah his seat ; 
Than to fall at his feet. My soul mounted higher, 

And the story repeat. In a chariot of fire, 

And the Saviour of sinners ad- 4 \nd the world was put under my feet 

^ Jesus, all the day long, 7 O . do .dpturous height 
Was my joy and my song ; Of that holy delight 

! that all his salvation might see ! Which I felt in the life-giving bloot 
He hath loved me, I cried, Of my Saviour possess'd. 

He hath suffer'd and died, I was perfectly bless'd, 

To redeem euch a rebel as me, Ovrrwhelni'd ujili the fulness of GodL 



8 What a mercy is this ! 
What a heaven of bliss ! 

How unspeakably favourM am I! 

Gather'd into the fold. 

With believers en'roll'd. 
With believers to live and to die ! 

9 Now my remnant of days 
Would I spend to his praise. 

Who hath died niv poor soul to rede* in 
Whether many or few. 
All my years are his due ; 

May they all be devotal to hirs 



i'49 



LEANDER. C. M 



t/lustf^ 



'^^?^^^^?.^^^^^:^^^^^S^^f \^^ 



:fc.z^ 






ip^pg^ 



-^J^^: 



^i 



~i8'~i — i»n 



H-^ 



-F3- 



"IHL 



My soul forsakes her vain delight. And bids the world farewell, Base as the dirt beneath thy feet. And mischievous as hell. No longer vrill I 



^t^^~im\=f=^^f^^^i^?^^^&?^^if^.n^i^^F^ 



!l 



-^ i » i »— i >»- 



^'gT= Nn'=^-^^^^^^^ -= 






'f^ 



-^— f- 



pEP> 



=*^B=i£FE 



-i»-f»— ^— 






^^^^^^^^11 



ask your love. Nor seek your friendship mote; The hap - pi - ness that ' approve, I» not with - in your pow'r. 



^M^^zi^^^^^^l^S^^E^iEg^^ii^ff 



CHRISTIAN SUiNb 



129 



irzii: 



a_E E 



-p-H-' 



i 



, a 6 6 < — P~ . _, 



ff-F^f^p-^ s ^^^r^ "r=p^=^ 



|V- 



^E^F^^i=^^"^ 



^^^^^jj^^^g z g^E^B 



P5=|a=^: 



Mine eyes arc now closing to rest, My body must ooon be removed, And mould'ring, lie buried in dust, No more to be envied or 



ibr±=±^^t 



^ 



- s— ^ 



-P^- 



f^^tJZTZS-^ 



-f-j— r— e-^ 



a=^l^^?^P^^g3J^gr?=£ ^ff"- 5 



^=f^'=l'^f =^=H^^I-^'4-^-'^ 






P^ 



:s — ^ 



" ^ .»• ♦ ♦ 



^f= 



^ 



P^ ^~ P ~ r- p p — jS^ ^fP 



-^P-F: 



^ » ^ ^ — ri 



£ 



E^ 



loved, >o more to be envied or loved. 



Ah! what is this drawing my breath, And stealing my senses a - way 



^- 



:5-±: 



9—m- 



—y-ird- 



^ 



r-^pa-g- 



p ° . 1 r 



a 



130 



CHRISTIAN SONG. Conlinuea 



^^- 



iy 



R^rT=4=^ 



risrw 



Tf-p-m- 



p^F^-q»=r=F fr 4 ""^"^ ^^"^^F 



W:^ 



ZzfcE 



-4-^ 



Z2I*- 



IS 



iESP 



p p p 



•I I I 



-9~»~ 



P-2^^-v 



^ 



iz& 



O tell me, tell mc, tell me, 



e±: 



-r-^ 



O tell me, my soul, is it death. Releasing me kindly from clay 1 



f?=r=Fr=p=F 



e 



mc 



JUZH 



I 



Now monntmg, my soul ehall de- 



H?Hr*=^=N:M=£ 



gg^^g^ 




^: 



scry The regions of pleasure and love, My spirit triumphant shall 



£££ 



Si2ife: 



P— p-i»-«- 



And dwell with my Saviour a - boTa 



i^iz: 



'^^m 




^^=^=F 



THE CHRISTIAN'S CONFLICTS. 7,6. 

Very B risk. t—s-s.—9—m- 



g: ?^^gs=g ^ ^|^EE|E ^EgE^i^rp=p 



fVm. Walker Dover Sel. p, 198 



131 



^^ 4.^zfczJJ:^z^ jE H ^r^|-rr ]-j =^rfc3i=y=jJt^ 



how the wicked kingdom Is falhng every day, And still our blessed Jesus Is winning souls a way ; But 



Li — 1 L 1 1 — I L. 



?= 



I 



m- 



aziE: 



fcS 



1^2: 



^ 



^S 



?=^ 



F 



y-j^-fzijf:. 



^^ 



^KnJ -hJ -^q ^E ^ 



O how I am tempted, No mortal tongue can tell, So often Fm sur • rounded Witn enemies from helL 



'111 



??E^E 



±^ 



"*~r TT 



g 



j3=S: 



f^: 



^ 



;.jszJ 



133 



BRUCE'S ADDRESS ^^J^Vwa/i^erf. 7,7,7,5,7,7,7,5. fVm. Walker. Dover Sel. p. 152 

..O # 



fe^S^^^^^si^^l^ 



m 



pP^Sfi^I^rFEp^ 



S 



^^^ 



¥--r 



^ 



=hr 



-©- 



±EESf_^ 



P-Pigidz 



1 — r-r 



Soldiers of Uie cross, arise, Lo, your Captain from the skies. Holding forth the gUtt'ring prize, Fear not, though the battle lower^ 

Calls to rictory. Firmly stand the 



m^ 



LuBE^E 



^ 



-p-p-e-r- 



EEaP^EE 



m 



£ 



-p- 



E 



^ 



:P^ 



m 



eEi§ 



^^^^^^§f 




trying hour. Stand the tempter's utmost power. 

Spurn his slavery. 



^^^^SSi 



2 Who the cause of Christ would yield ? 
Who would leave the battle-field ? 
Who would cast away his shield 1 — 

Lot tiim basely go : 
Who for Zion's King will stand t 
Who will join the faithful band i. 
Let him come with heart and hand, 

Let him face the foe. 

3 By the mercies of our God, 

By Emmanuel's strcnming blood. 
When alone for us he stood, 
Ne'er give up the strife : 



EvcV ^ the latest bieath. 
Hark to what your Captain saith ;- 
" Be thou faithful unto death ; 
Take the crown of life." 

4 By the woes which rebels prove. 
By the bliss of holy love, 
Sinners, seek the joys above , 

Sinners turn, and live ! 
Hero is freedom worth the name ; 
Tyrant sin is put to shame ; 
Grace inspires the hallow'd flama 

God the crown will givsu 



INDIAN CONVERT, (or NASHVILLE). 8,8,6 



ii^hnsoii 



133 



. . .. . „ I s^™ V 



look Heb'n, and send up cry, Den rue look Ik-b'n, and send up cry, Up - on my knee so low; Tml 




3. So me !ub God. wid inside heart. 
llo fight for ine. he lake mn |mrt» 

He save uni hfe before; 
God bear pnnr Indj-in in de wood; 
So me lub him, ami ual be good 

;Me prize him evermore. 



4. De joy I Mt I cannot tell. 

To link dat I was saved from hen, 

Throueh Jesus' streaming blood; 
Dat I am saved by grace divine, 
Who am de worst of all mankind, 

O glory be to God ; 



5. Now I be here baptized to t»e, 
Dat in de water yon may see 

De wav my Jcfus go; 
Dis is de wav I do beli<?ve 
Dat Ji^sus liere for us did leave. 
To follow nere below 



vhilc he was relating it : Hie last two verses were composed by David Wkt.% 



134 



IMANDKA. ll's. 



*?. Damsou 



|^p^|^ ^gE^gte ^bgfg^^^£p^^|5j^brFrPS 



^^M 



S^^^^^^g^^^E^E^^t^^^teE 



I 



^ ^^m^^^m 




I love thee, 
I love thy dear 



, my Sa>W. I love thee, my Lord,? with tender emoUon I love sinners too. Since Jesus 
Jcar people, thy ways, and thy word ; > 



has died to redeem them from wo. 




tn 



J O Jesus, my Saviour, I know thou irt nine. 
For tlue all the pleasures of sin I rcsi,^ ; 
Of ol'jecls most pleasing, I love thee the best, 
Witliout thco I'm wretched, but with thee I'm blest. 



S TTiy Spirit first taught me to know ! was blind, 
Then taught me the way of salvation to find : 
And when I was sinking in gloomy despair, 
Thy mercy relieved me, and bid me not fear. 



a In vain I attempt to describe what I feel, 
The language of mortals or angels would fail ; 
My .lesus is precious, my soul's in a flame. 
I'm raised to a rauture while uraisiiin his nam* 



4 I find him in singing, I find liim in prayer. 
In sweet meditation he always is near ; 
My constant companion, O may wc ne'er part ' 
All glory to Jesus, he dwells in my heart. 

6 I love thee, my Saviotir, &c 

6 My Jesus is precious — I cannot forbear. 
Though smners despise me, his love to declare ; 
His love ovenvhelms me ; had I wings I'd fly 
To praise him in mansions prepared in the sky. 

7 Then millions of ages my soul would emplo> 
In praising my Jefus, my love and my joy 
Without interruption, when all the glad throng 
With pleasures unceasins unite <u the aonn. 



iFhitEP- 



.1^ 



:s:P: 



WHITESTOWN. L. M 



ffarJ 



133 



^^-- 



^^:^^^^ii^^l^^^^ ^^ ^^ E^ 



f^ ^frr^^^^^^^p^^^f-^^^^^ 



^^^=^^^J:^ ^^F^^g=^^g^^^^^pg 



Where nothing dwelt but beaats of prey, Or men as fierce and wild as they, He bids th' oppress'd and poor repair, They sow the fieids, and 

And build them towns and cities there. 



m-^ 



fi — 



ipgfe£^£^HE^H^-li^F^^ 



r^f^Fm^^iai J3J^i:^:f^^^ff ^ ff^-f" ^P^"^^^li^^ 



I^Ep^^l^g^pfffe^fj^gB^ggp rlf r ^ ^^^ 





trees they plant, 

Whose yearly fruit supplies their want ; 



Their race grows up from fruitful stocks,Their wealth increases with their flocks. 



— l -T-I-l-- 



-WfS^f 



mt 



^^f^ ^ ^ij^^-'^ ^^i^ 



136 



PORTUGUESE HYMN. 1'. iM 




Hither, ye faithful, haste with songs of triumph, To Bethlehem haste, the Lord of life to meet : To you this day is bom a Prince and 



^H^:t-^ 



jiLZ^ E^z^zfe: 



■±1 



^5: 



£E 



te^s 



^s 



^ 



H3?^&Ea^l 



p^ 



! ^z;^z=gizs: -n— ^-^^ 



f=5= 






-^— d- 



e 



^ 



H 




Saviour ; O come and let us worship, O come and let as wor • siiip, O come and let us wor • sliip at his feet. 



•> ~ 1~ 






O Jesus, for such wondrous condescension, 

Our praises and reverence are an oHenng meet , 

^fuw is the Word made flesh and dwells amon^ U3 
( I come and let us worship at his feet 



i^^^feSI 



3 Shout his almighty name, ye choirs of angels, 
And let the celestial courts his praise repeat ; 
Unto our God be gloiy in the highest, 
O comn and let us worship at his Sock 



SWEET PROSPECT. CM. 



^^h-T^ 



pES^^EH^ 



fVfn. Walker Dover ^el ',>. il l IS'' 



HUE 



ie^E^&^^ 



>-^- 



- ^-^F 



JEp: 



i-fKr-zp- 



£^E 



ICO 



Ee?e^^ 



BE 



:P 



^ 



On • Jor - dan's stormy banks I stand, And cast a wish - ful eye, ^ 
To Ca - naan's fair and ha^) - py land, Where my pos - sessions lie. ^ 



O the trans - port - ing, rapturous scene. That 



4-^ 



m 



E^J 



&z 



±-l 



-■^=^ 



M=?^ 



a 



=^^g 



t=^ 



itzzrr 



:P- 



ip^ 



-P- 



^ 



-P — P- 



§^ 



i^ 



^^P 



:?= 



S^_^EP^^^ 



n - ses to m/' sight, Sweet fields ar - ray'd in liv - ing green, And r: leta of de • light 



^: 



L=:-p=t: 



-h-?- 



^^J^zz^i^^^E^ 



-p— p- 



S 



zi_-zg-zP: 



rsfi 



E^^^^^l 



-ILZB: 



THE PILGRIM'S LOT. 8,8,6. ^. Gramblin. Mercer's Cluster, p. 224. 



5g^^m§^^S^fe^te^ 



How happy is the pilgrim's lot, How free fiom anxious care md thought, How free from anxious care and thought. From worldly hope and fear ; Con- 



^^^^ 



F^F^ ^"^F^^ f%^ ^H l^g^^ 



-9=ra 



^^IteEE^Of^^S 



2zEf 



r?" 



^ES- 



'^r-^ 



It?: 



-r--> 



^Pt 



1 r 



^ 



^-p- 



ZT"! — P ~l — 
-t—i — S'ZZZ 



>=Ti=Br 



"-w' Lb ' B m^ — ~~ — ^ 



^E^ 



fined to neither court nor cell. His soul disdains on earth to dwell, His soul dia • dains on earth to dwell. He on-ly sojouru here 



ib: 



f-E: 



-^-y-^ 






DOtZ 



^=P=P=^,^=^^> 



jj* I ^ I" — 1«« I 



££ 



i=a 



:F=F 



^F^^ 



3^a? 



-^^h- 



^-i 



r-^ 



HALLELUJA H. 8, 6, 8, 6, 8, 6, 8, 7. 



Dr. Harrison. 



139 



-W—W' 



J L 



£ 



|tpzp^4=p=^[^^^ pSa^grjC=pzj; 



I 



^-^ 



£eE 



^F=^f 



^3^ 



^=^ 



9-^ 



S 



tial 



= FE£E^±^g p 



He comes! becomes! the Judge severe! halle, hal - le - lu - -'ah I ? „. ,■ , ■ ^ . , . 

The seventh trum - pet speaks him near ! halle, hal - le - lu-jahlj "" lightmng flash and thunder roU 



i^^^^^S 



^EEg 



£ 



:ta: 



£E 



-P-P- 



hl: 



i 



£^^F=^=i^ 



-p-p- 



^^PS3eE 



s 



p=r=p^= jE^^^ 



;£^ 



halle, hal - 'e lu • jah ! 



How welcome to the faith - fill soul, O hal - le, hal • le • lu • jah I 



^£gE^^E F n^"^ -^H^^ 



zbJ: 



^ 



_H__BL"ZX. 



140 



1^ 



K.NOXYILLE. 8,8,8,8,7 



Jt. Mondat/ 



Dover Sel. d. 7i. 



" ^ — I H~f~r M ~ n a P 



m 



:5i«- 



^ 



5 



;f=F 



J= 



E£ 



Re - joice, my friends, the Lord is King, ? 
Let all pre - pare to take him in, 5 



Let Jacob rise, and Zi on sing, And all the earth witn praises 






^^t^- 



"^■^ -f-c-frr 



fea^g ^^igj 



ring, And give to Jo - sus glory 



8 ! may the desert land rejoice, 
And mourners hear the Saviour's voice ; 
While praise their every tongue employs. 
And all obtain immortal joys, 
And give to Jesus glory. 

5 O * may the sanits of every name 
Unite to praise the bleeding Lamb ! 
May jars and discords cease to flame. 
And all the Saviour's love proclaim, 

And give to Jesus glory. 
41 long to see the Christians join 
In union sweet, and peace divine ; 
When every church with grace shall shine, 
And grow in Christ the living vine, 

And give to Jesus glory. 

6 Come, parents, children, bond, and free, 
Come, who will go along with mc 1 
I'm bound fair Canaan's land to see, 
And shout with saints eternally. 

And give to Jesus glory 



6 Those beauteous fields of living green, 
By faith my joyful eyes have seen ; 
Though Jord.-m's billows roll between. 
We soon shall cross the narrow stream, 

And give to Jesus glory. 

7 A few more days of pain and wo, 
A few more suffering scenes below, 
And then to Jesus we shall go. 
Where everlasting pleasures flow. 

And there we'll give him glory. 

8 That awful trumpet soon will sound. 
And shake the vast creation round. 
And call the nations under ground, 
And all the saints shall then be crown'd, 

, And give to Josus glory. 

9 Then shall our tears be wljrd away, 
No more our feet shall ever stray; 
When we arc freed from cumbrous claj 
We'll praise the Lord in endless dai 

\nd (nve to '-sus clarv 



¥ 



HAIL, COLUMBIA 



MJ 



sL ^zpJ ^^^pfr |gg^:|^ ?fF - fF^^ ^ Eg^ 






& 



Hail, Columbia ! happy land ! Hail, ye heroes, heav'n-bom band ! Who fought and bkd in freedom's cause, Who fought and bled in freedr.-n's cause. 






nzzTX 



^ISE^-^P^ 



-| > k P^^~ 



?^ 



1 



£^p-arFaE^ 



^=F 



:^-^J 



a^ 



EE^ 



-tzts 



»'.• 



:?=«: 



s 






S: 



T^Cll^ZpZ 



e£ 



is^SES^ 



-czIiESSiE-jEE 



:(izi?zi 



s 



And TTQen the storm of wai is Rone, Enjoy the peace your valour won; Let independence be your boast, Ever mindful what it cost; Ever grateful 



£ 






IdgZCZlZ. 



iszztzMurg 
-! — cizczrs;^; 



3E£? 



— g — r^'^''i ^ 



•arra-ar- 



ta 



^^ 



l4iJ 



HAIL. COLUMBIA! Continxied. 



a ^r-rfB ig ^-F^^ 



t rw^^ 



-m-^ 



w^m 



i^^^^g^^£ %-K^r-trh H^^ pe |^g^F^¥5'^^^ 



for the prize. Let its altar reach the skies. Fiim, united, let <is l«. Rallying round our lib • er - ty. 



@=£; 



1t=K 



~r~-^ - *' •• 



^^ 



:fea: 



Si=^ 



££^ 



^ 



H^^ 



^^ 



EeMJE5;^=FN=^^: ±^ ^^= FFF^^ 



^ 



r^ ^ h 



^^EEt^ESgE^g^ggi^^^ii^ 



A* a band oi 



bro thera join'd. 



± 



itus: 



Peace 



and safe • ty 



J 



we shall find. 



-f ffr- -I — 



I 



SALUTATION. 7,6,8,7,7,0.7,6. 



Mercer s i-hisier, p. S30 



J-13 




"^^^fefessSSiP 



b-^ B ^^ 1— L 



^ 



Good morning, brother pilgrim, March you towards Jenisalem, i*ray, wherefore are you smiling, We 

What, bound for Canaan's coast ? To join the heav'nly host 1 While tears run down your face 1 




^^m 



"T8"P • 



g=^=PU= 



H^ 



©E^^ 



g-p 



s 



fji^sa 



I 



^ ♦ H 



^*-^ 









-P 



s?s 

-p ^-^ 



ES*E 



£EFEE 



soon shall cease from toiling, And reach that hcfv'niy place ; 

^And reach that heav'nly place. We soon shall cease from toiling, And reach that heav'nly place. 




2 To Canaan's coast we'll hasten, 

To join the heavenly throng. 
Hark ! from the Danks of Jordan, 

IIow sweet the pilgrims' song ! 
Their Jcsiis they are viewing, 

3y failh we see him oo, 
Wc smile, and weep, aiwl praise him, 

Ajid ou ou/ vray (iiunic 



3 Though sinners do despise us, 

And treat us with disdain, 
Our former comrades slight us 

Esteem us low and mean 
No earthly joy shall charm us, 

While marching on our way, 
Our Jesus will defend ua, 

III Ui*» difiLrcssiniz dsv. 



4 The frowns of old companions, 

We're willing to sustain. 
And in divine compassion, 

To pray for them again ; 
For Christ, our loving Saviour, 

Our Comforter and Friend, 
Will bless us wnh his favour, 

And Euide us lo the end. 



4 With streams of consolation. 

We're filled as with new wine • 
We die to transient pleasures, 

And live to things divine • 
We sink in holy raptures 

While viewing things abov*. 
Why glory to my iSnvipur 

My loul i« full of i»T« 



144 



^ 



O COME, COME AWAY 



Treble by W. Homer. 



W^~*~ 



^Z£^ : 



1. comp, come a - way I the Sab-batU morn is pass - ing ; Let's hast - en to the Sabbath school ; come, come a - way ! 



The 




2. My com-rades in - vite to join their hap- py num-ber, And glad-ly will I meet them there ; comn, come a - way! 'Tis 



f=p|=f==M^ 



^r:^ 



?^^ 



^S^ 



n^ 



eE 



?3 



3. While oth - era may seek for vain and fool - ish plea-sures, The Sab-bath-school shall be my choice ; come, come a - way ! How 

fl- 



■J f h I ^ 



^ 



^ ^^^^^m 



frf^r r ^ \ tt^ 



Sab-bath bells are ring - ing clear, Their joy - ous peals sa - lute my ear, ' I love their voice to hear; come, come a - way! 



S^i^S 



g 



M 



1 



there we meet to sing and pray. To read God's word on his glad day, With joy let's 




Ik — ^ 



^^^ 



haste a - way, come, come a - way I 

I P P Pig? » y- 



a^fePEE 



m 



dear to hear the plaintive strain. From youthful voi - ces rise a-main. With sweet - est 
4. 5. 

'Tis there I may learn the ways of heavenly wisdom, 1 there hear the voice in heavenly accents speaking. 



To guide my feeble steps on high; come, &c. 
The flow'ry paths of peace to tread, 
Whore rays of heavenly bliss are shed. 

My wjnJ'ring stops to lead: come. &o. 



'Let little children come to me; come, &c. 
Forbid them not their hearts to give. 
Let them on me in youth believe. 
And I will them receive:" come, &o. 



tones a - gain ! come, come a - way 1 
6. 

With joy I accept the gracious invitation ; 
My heart exults with rapturous hope; como, So 

My deathless spirit, when I die. 

Shall, on the wings of angels, fly 
To muasiuu.i lu tlie sky : O come. &o. 



RHODJ^ ICELAND. 8 8,6 



Meih. Hymn Book, p. 107. 140 



^^Sepe^^^^^^I 



e^^il 



s±M 



^^l| ^igg^gfe^^3a^^ 3|=ggrj 



Thou great, mys to - nous God unknown, WhoEO love hath gen - tly led me on, E'en from my in - fant days - 



-±b±: 



±= 



^r:^ 



5=^^ 



^ 



^ 



I 



^^K^^fe^fe^ 



«: 



S3=^ 



P=P 



5f^ 



e 



»-r-f-F 



i> 



^^fe^^S^ 



J in I 



My in - most aoul ei - pose to view, And tril me if I e - ycT knew Thy jus - ti fy - lEg grace. 



;^^^EEK^-=^i|^^^p;;^^EgEi^p 



— •- 



12 



146 



J^ilFtEis 



^rnu 



KOVAL PROCLAMATION. 8,8,8,8,8,3 



Dover Sel. p. 13 



gg^£ FiimT?frg|?? fe S 



qt±3 



^i 



It: 



EEfiHf 



fe ^^^^^^g^gg^^S^^f^^ ^^l 



Hear the royal procla - mation, The glad tidings of sal - valion, Publish - ing to every creature, To the ruin'd sons of nature ; Jssus 

"P"*' B M Chorus. 

"1 n~ g^" 



gi|^gg jgg^g E^^i i E|B |;^^ 



tit 



1^ _^,.^ _____ H v>nwuB. 



1^ 



:F* 



Ea 



^^s 



— — '-\ -^ I a 



reigns, he raigns victorious, - ver heav'n and earth most glorious, Jesus reigns. 



S^^S^ 



SM 



2 See the royal banner flying, 
Hear the heralds loudly crying, 
" Rebel sinners, royal favour 
Now is ofler'd by the Saviour." 

Jesus reigns, &c 

3 Hear, ye sons of wrath and niin. 
Who have wrought your own undoing. 
Here is life and free salvation, 
Ofler'd to the whole creation. 

Jesus reigns, Sic, 

i Turn unto the Lord most holy, 
Shun the paths oi mcc and folly ; 
Turn, or you are lost for ever, 
(J I now turn to <mhI the Saviour. 

Jex\3» reigu, ttA 



PASTORAL ELEGY. 8 s. 



U7 




E^i^^^H^ 



ggEgpfe^-H.-£ | :-FrFe^ "g - 



ear, As softly they pass through She vale. Sweei 



\\'hat sorrowful *)unJa do I hear Move slowlv along in the gale ? How solemn they fall on my ear, As softly ihey pass through She vale. Sweei 



^f^^S. 




:s:^z®" 






i^ 



^ ^^^^E0^S^ ^rff^\ 



k:P-^ 



K^chzi: 



^^^ 



^ 



:S= 



Corydon's notes are all o'er, Now lonely he deeps in the clay, His chcelis bloom with roses no rnoue, Siflce death call'il lijs s^'mt away. 



g.=g-;ggir|:pE^Efe^EggggE^ £:ai ^|g^ ^^p:-^feff 



t Snrret woodbines will rise round his feet, 
And willows their sorrowing wave ; 
Young hyacinths freshen and bloom, 
While hawthorns encircle his grave. 
Each mom when the sun gilds the east, 
(The green grass bespangled with dew,) 
He'll cast his bricrht beams on the west, 
To charm the Sitd Carolme's view. 



3 O Corydon ! hear the gad cries 
Of Caroline, plaintive and slow ; 
O spirit ! look down from the skies, 
And pity thy mourner below ; 
'Tis Caroline's voice in the grove. 
Which Philomel hears on the plain , 
Then striving the mourner to soothe, 
Wi'h Rvmoathv ioins in her strain. 



4 Ye shegbjerds so blithesome and young. 
Retire itova your sports on the green, 
Since Corydon's deaf to my song, 
The wolves tear the lambs on the plain 
Each swain round the forest will stray 
And sorrowing hang down his head. 
His pipe then in symphony play, 
Sojne dirtie to sweet CcrvdoTi'-i wliade. 



5 And when the still night has unfurl'd. 
^{er ^obes p'er the hamlet around. 
Gray twilight retires from the world. 
And darkness encumbers the ground, ■ 
I'll leave my owr gloomy abode. 
To Corydon's urn will I flv. 
There kneeling will bless tue just Gfil 
Who dwell: 1 mansions qii b;,rl 



14& 



MISSISSIPPI. 8, 8, 8, 7, 8, 8, a. 3, 3, 3, 8. 



Hru,iisnarv. 



^J^J^^^^f^^pE^^^=^ 



jce 



P '• 'g-r 



g^^^^^i^^^ 



^^g^zr-f:^P+ F|£!'^E^ ;^^^e^rjg^g^^ ^ 



When Gabriel's awful trump shall sound, And rend the rocks, convulse the ground, Ye dead, arise to judgment ; See lightnings 

And give to time her ut - most bound, 



|g S£g^fe:^g^^^^^^^^^g^gl^-Eg±£?Eg| 



♦-►^♦. 




m^ 



m 



ii^^S^^^^s^S 



flash and thunders roll. See earth wrapt up like parchment sciull ; Dread amaie, The guilty sons of Adam's race, T^nsaved 'rom sin by Jesus. 

Comets blaze. Sinners raise. Horrors seize 



§^^S^: 



irP-i^- 



r«a:H 



FFFF^ 



£ 



fell's^ 



=P=P=F 



:^ 



^^^feS^fi 



The ChnKuan tiil'd with rapturous joy, Midst flamin; worlds he mount-! on high. To meet the .Saviour in the sky. .^iiU sen ihe n»f« of Jesus ; 

T he ioul and body ruunito. And fiU'd with dory infinite. Riesse<l dav. CLristians say ! Will you uray. Tb«t wc niav All join ilie lia|ipy comiiany. To ptiu»c inc namo of Jiwj' 



LKNA. 8.7 



149 



^^s^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^?^m^M 



\-^. 






^Se 



•— W- 



^E^EfEp^g^ feE^gEpj^ Ef^jEgzigxl 



the Lord of glory dying ! See him gasping ! hear him crying ! 8eo his burden'd bosom heave I 



^^^SEiE^ ^^ ^=:^^^ ^^^^^ ^=^ ^ ^SX^!^^ =^ 



1 



jRIZjP — g 



^ ^= f=^' 3^^ ^-\ ^Z51.p^--^-U i ^P^r^=^ ^^ T^ ^^ 



'WHJIl. 



iEEgEg:-EiE SEE^E^jgppp:;Eg^:^^fE5L?lF^E^£ : 5gi^^ 



Look, ye sinners, ye that hung him ; Look, how deep your sins have stung him ; Dy - ing sin ners, look and live. 



^ 






i- 



>--*ir: 



»^ 



'^ n~i — "~ 



^l^^^^E^^^^-ft 



150 



I'JLGRIM. 8, (),d 0,8,6,8,6. CM 



^^^^^p^i^&i^Sitt 




^tefetHsMf 



Come, all ye tnoummg pilgrims dear, Who'rc bounJ for Canaan's lanJ, 5 Our Ca{Hain's gone before us, Our Father's only Son, 
Take courase and fight raliantly. Stand fast with sworJ in hand; 5 



^^^^?^-^ 



pE^J^Sj^^ppS 



szJts: 




Then, pilgrims dear, pray, do not fear. But let us foUon- on. 






2 We have a howling wilderness, 

To Canaan's happy shore, 
* Hnd of dearth, and pits, and snares. 

Where chilling winds do roar. 
But Jesus will be with us, 

And guard us by the way ; 
Though enemies cjcamine us. 

He'll teach us what to say 



3 The pleasant fields of paradise, 
bo glorious to behold, 
The valleys clad in nving green, 

The mountains paved with gold: 
(Tie ireca of life with hnavenly fruit. 
Behold how rich thev rtanb 



Blow, gentle gales, aad bear my soul 
'I'o Canaan's happy land. 

4 Sweet rivers of salvation all 

Through Canaan's land do roll. 
The beamsof day bring glittering scene* 

Illuminate my soul ; 
There's ponderous clouds of glory, 

All set in diamonds bright ; 
.ind there's my smiling Jesus, 

Who is my heart's delight. 

6 Already to my raptured sight. 
The blissful fields anse. 
And plenty spreails her suuiing store*. 
Inviting to mv evea. 



O sweet abode of endless rest, 

I soon shall travel there. 
Nor earth nor all her empty joy» 

Slwll long detain mc here 

6 Come, all you pilgrim travellers, 
Fresh courage take by me ; 
Meantime I'll tell you how I came. 

This happy land to see ; 
Through faith the glorious teles(.u|n 

I view'd the worlds above, 
Vnd Hod the Fatkcr reeonrilo<l. 
Which 611s my heart with I<it* 



REPOSE. 8 7 



151 



tZL 



i^^fe^^3^^pp^^Efe^ 



ig^3^f:"g5rjijjlj^^^^EJ^ig^''^^^^^P^r 



ipn: 



-a— WtB- 



i 



The Lamb appears to wipe our tears, And to complete our glory ; Then shall we rest with all the blest, And lell the lovely story. To 



^^J^zjiazat 



m 



"?zPzi* 



rzg: 



E^F 



!>-!^l 



=f^^fl^ 



^g^g^ ^ ^Jg^^^^g? 



-tP-p- 



ww 



-Ezsz 



:£F 



3Ef 



-P- 



m 



3^g^^F^^Eg 3Jfeq? -^rj^^ 



IiriE|j jig=p|jri^tfigi Er[5E|:i 



^JgS^^J^f^^^EB^z^^J^J^JjEfT^^JHS^^r^^g^P^ 



sit and tell Christ loved us well, And that when we were sin • ners ; Heaven will ring, while saints do sing, " Glory to the Redeem - cr " 



iJ^ 



W- 



?&^:E3 



iPzil 



g=^F 



^Ef^s; 



'^~i — p^ ^ 



^13 



3c:^ 



— 9-P-r 



^^'^ElEf^ie^ ^^g ^'^^SSj^Kp^ 



1 6a 



TRANSPORT. 12,11 



i^^^i^^^ss^i^^^i^^ 



^^ ^^^^ ^s ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 



%s^ 

—4^^ 



Vo children of Jesus, who're bound for the kingdom, Altunc all your voices, and help me to sing ? \i/u„„ i„„„ „,„ ,„ ,„ i „„ „„,„„ r ™.» 

„ , ^., ,-T T«i_- V. •»! 1- f When Jesus nrst lounu me astray i was 

Sweet antbemj of praises to my loving Jesus, r or he is my prophet, my pncst, and ray king ; > ■' 



V 

goiuK, His 






S 



^^^^^ ^f^ ^f^^^^ 




pisKtep^feS^is^Ssiisli 



^P^^ 



■^S: 



-^•- 



E^^' 



EB?: 



^I^^E^^^^fefei 



love dill surround me, and saved me from ruin, He kindly embraced me, and freely he btess'd me. And taught me aloud his (weet praises tj sing 



.l^i^^^^^^^Si^ 



3 Why should you go mourninc; from such a physician, 
• '■ome to him liclieiing, though bad your condition. 
My soul he hath healed, my heart he rejoices, 
"11 uirvc him, inl praise him. and always adore hir) 




Who's able And willing your sickness to cure . 
ilis Father has promised your case to ensure : 
lie brought me to Zion, to hear the glad voices. 
Till we meet in heaven where iiartiiie's no mon 



UPTON. L.M. 



153 



^^3 



£ 



^ 



tzB 



ezB 



^ 



'-S 



£i^ 



1. Bless, my soul, the liv-ing God, Call home thy thoughts that rove abroad ; Let all thepow'rs within me join In work and worship so di - rine. 






^ 



p; 



a 



i 



2. Bless, my soul, the God of grace ; Uis favours claim the highest praise : Why should the wonders he has wrought Be lost in silence and forgot ? 



m^- 



-^ 



«=^:f^ 



-T 



^ 



SI^ 



^ 



-E 



fcg 



i trrtFF^=rtfT 



3. Let the whole earth his pow'r confess, Let the whole earth adore his grace ; The Gentile with the Jew shall join In work and worship so di - vine. 
WELTON. L. M. Theme by Ilalan. 



;fe) L:. i i. ( >. ^' V ^ 



m 



=p 



f^rn^ 



-^ 



pF=FiKrt:5^rr"^n ^p^ 



^i^ 



-j — I — \—n — I—' ■ — -\ — I — I — I \ — ^^ — I 1 — I — I — \ — \ — r~r 

1 Thou great In-struc-tor, lest I stray, Oh ! teach my err - ing feet thy way: Thy truth, with ever fresh deljght. Shall guide my doubtful steps aright. 



s 



g 



^fl^ MJU^J^ 



^ 



n-^ 



£f^^ 



a 



2. How oft my heart's af-fections yield. And wander o'er the world's wide field. My rov-ing passions, Lord, reclaim, Unite them all to fear thy name. 



?^^^^ 



^^ 



m 



£Mgmt 



s 



SZ3Z 



^^-^ 



S Tnen, tn my (lod, my heart and tongue. With all their pow'rs, shall raise the song: On earth thy glories I'll de-clare, Till heav'n th' immortal notes shall hear. 



154 



KAMBIA. S. M. 



fc^i: 



^ 



m 



■M^-f- 



1. Lord, what a fee - ble piece Is this our mor-tal frame ! Our life, how poor a tri 



~I 



^^i 



'tis. That scarce de - Bcrres the Dame ! 




2. A - las ! 'twas brit - tie clay That built our bo - dy first ! And ev' - ry month and cv' - ry day 'Tis mould'ring back to dust. 



3. Our moments fly apace, 

Our feeble powers decay ; 
Swift as a flood our hasty days 
Are sweeping us away. 



4. Yet if our days must fly. 

We'll keep their end in sight, 
We'll spend them all in wisdom's ways, 
And let tliem speed their flight. 



5. They'll waft us sooner o'er 
This life's tempestuous sea : 
Soon shall we reach the peaceful shore. 
Of blost eternity. 



LISBON. S. M. 



(3:;i: 



Vel-comc, sweet day of rest, Tho 



^ 



jbeMe^- 



m 



P 



J-J- 



Theme ly Read. 



"I [ — I 1 ! 

Ti - ving breast. And these re- joio-ing eyes. 



1. Wel-comc, sweet day of rest, Tnat saw the Lord a - rise; Wei - come to this re 



3^^ 



^ 



3^ 



^ 



p=f=^ 



i 



1 



2. The king him-self comes near. To feast his saints to - day; Here we may sit, 



^ 



& 



Sfeitef^ 



see him here. And love, and praise, and pray. 



8. One day a - mid tho place Where my dear God hath been. Is sweet -cr than 
4 My will - ing soul would staj In such a frame as this, And sit and sing 



^^^ 



E^B tt 



thou-saud days Of plea - sur - a - blc sin. 
- self a • way To ev - er - last - ing bliss 




SWEET SOLITUDE. L. M 






^S 



1--E=r 






E^Hitfl 



^^a^s^^^tefe 



i^^^^^ 



Hail, BoIituJe ! thou gentle (jueen, Of moJcst air and brow serene, 'Tis thou inspires the poet's theme, Wrapp'd in sweet vision's airy Jream ; Wrapp'H 





— I — tj|-— ^r- tsm ^ 



f=^-pl^F=^ 



in sweet vision's ai - rj dream, Wrapp'd in sweet vision s airy dream. 



^zSrt 



:pi 



±z±ZLzl±x: 



-j— 1^- 



ie^lsil 



2 Parent of virtue, muse of thought, 
By thee are saints and patriots taught 
Wisdom to thee her treasures owe. 
And in thy lap fair science grow. 

3 Whate'er's in thee, refines and charms, 
Excites to thought, to virtue warms ; 
Whate'er is perfect, firm and good, 
Wa owe to thee, sweet soUtude. 

4 With thee the charms of life shall last, 
E'en when the rosy bloom is past ; 
When slowly pacing time shall spread 
Thy silver blossoms o'er my bead. 

5 No more with this vain world pei plex'd, 
Thou shall prepare me for the next 
The spring of life shall gently cea'te. 
And angels waft my soul to neaoe. 



156 



THE GOOD OLD WAY. L. M. 



If'm. fVaiker. Dover Sel. p. bt> 






£eI 



t:^ttt! 



I "^ — ^ r — ^^ ' I I 



3-.^ 



<r^3i 



:?zS± 



£ 



^_^M 



W'F- 




Lift up your heads, Inimanue'.'s friends, O halle, 
And taste the pleasure Jesua sends, O halle, 



halle - lujah, ^ 
halle - lujah. 5 



Let nothing cause you to delay, halle, hallo 



lu - jab, 





2 Our conflicts here, though gront they be, 
Shall not prevent our victory. 

If we but watch, and strive, and pray. 
Like soldiers in the good old way. 
ciioncs. 
And I'll sing hallclujah, 

And glory be to God on high ; 
And I'll sing hallelujah. 

There's glory beaming from the sky. 

3 O good old way, how sweet thou art 1 
May none of us from thcc depart. 
But may our actions always say. 
We're inarching on the good old way. 

And I'll sing, Slc 

4 Though Satan may his power employ, 
Our peace and comfort to destroy. 
Yet never fear, we'll gani the dav. 
And triumph in the good old wav 

Ami I'll sinu. ic 



.') .\nd when on Pisgah'a top we stand. 
And view liy faith the promised land. 
Then we may sing, and shout, and pray 
And march along the good old way. 
.\nd I'll sing, &c. 

6 Ve valiant souls, for heaven contend ; 
Remember glory's at the end ; 

Our God will wipe all tears away. 
When we have run the good old way. 
And I'll sing, &c 

7 Then far beyond this mortal shore, 
We'll meet with those wlio're gone bcfoiq 
And him we'll praise in endless day. 
Who brought us on the good old nay 

And I'll sine, drc 



vVORCESTER. S. M. 



Hv- 10. B. 1. Watts. 



157 



fe 



^l^^^^KSi^S^ 



And words of pe*""* reveal, Who, &c. And, &c. Kow. &c. 



it>& — 



m 



m 



fegSSiS§^^ 



How beauteous are their feet Who stand on Zion's hill ; Who bring salvation on their tongues, And words of peace reveal. 



How charming is their voica. 



S^ ^^ ^ 






-&>> 



ItZEXIj 



ffffKrgg^ 



fei 



:gti 



'^m 






s 



^g gj^fe ^^^^K^P^Pff^^^ 



Zion 



He 



3S 



ggsa^ 



^,*» 



^Sh^iE^^BSS^KS 



How sweet ttiS tidings are, Zion, ochold thy Saviour king. He reigns and triumphs here. Zion He 









"P-Pgi 



izr 



ESat?^ 



g^^Sl^^f 



158 



FiL(iHlM'S FAREWELL. 12 s 8s. 



tJover Sel. p la,-> 



ffi^t;^g^%p g!i^:FFigpg^g^5ig^| 3^£i^^ 



fe^^ 1 g^^g^^^ 3^^Ej5pP^^^ 




Farewell, farewell, farewell, my friends, I must be gone, I have no home or stay with you ; I'll take my staff and travel on. Till I a letter world can view. 



If^ggH^pjI^^iil^^gii^gl 



j igFF?rP_^^ g^g££^^iS fgggi"pli ^P 






mm 



i^^^^?^^^^^^ ^^^ E^^^^^fEfK^&^ ^\m^ 4i 



I'll march to Canaan's land, I'll land on Canaan's shore, Where pleasures never end, .\nd troubles come no more. FareivcII, .•]: ij: my loving friends, farewell. 

f- 



^^^i^Si^Mglsi^liiSiSig^^iflf 



2 Farewell, &c. my friends, time rolls along. 
Nor wails for mortal cares or bliss, 
I'll leave you here, and travel oa 
Till 1 arrive where Jc^us in. 

I'll march. &C. 

FiirewuiL *« 



3 Farewell, &c. dear brethren in the Lord, 
To you I'm bound with cords of love 
But we believe his gracious word. 
We all ere long shall meet above, 

I'll march, iic. 

farewell, if 



4 Farewell, /.t. ye blooming sons of God, 
Sore conflicts yet remain for vou ; 
Uut dauntless keep the heavenly road 
Till Canaan's happy land vou view 

I'll inarcn, dec 

" arew^ll, tareneUi larowsll, rov lir>IIMb 



LUTHER. S. M. 



SasUngs. 



150 




1. My soal, be on thy guard, Ten thousand foes a-riso; And hosts of sin are press-ing hard To draw thee from the skies, To draw thee from the sliies. 



w~ 



^^£± 



m 



3 



lii^ 



^^ 



:g=fc 



sis; 



1 



2. watrh. and fi^'ht, anil pray, 
'Ibe battle ne'er pire o'er; 
Renew it loudly every dny, 
And help diviae implore. tQ: 



3. Ne'er think the xictory won, 
Nor once at cape sit down : 
Thy nrduoiis work will not be done 
Till thou hast got the crown.:!!; 



4. Fight on. my soul, till death 
Shall brin;;; thee to thy (.iod: 
Ile'll take thice at thy parting breath. 
Up to his rest above. :^ 



NEW HAVEN. 0,6,4,6,6,6,4. 



Hastings. 




. Coiiie, tliou incarnate Word, 
Gird on thy mli^hty sword, 

uiiT prayer attend; 
Come, and thy p<?opIe bless. 
And ^ivo thy word succesd: 



3. Come, holy Comforter, 
Thy sacred witness bear 

In this glad hour- 
Thou who almighty art. 
Now rule in every heart. 
And no'er from us depart, 
£t>ii"it vl [*ow©r* 



4. To the great One and Three 
The highest praises be, 

Hence — evermiTw 1 

ni.=i sovendgn mtge^ty 

3Iay we in glory see. 

And to cfornity 

jA)Te and adura. 



IfiO HYMN. 13,11. 

_ ji J* Slowly mi ll li-nd iTly . 



TAou art gone to the grave. 



(Scotland.) 



Dr. John Clarke. 



.i*-* 



fe^.y^y^"^^a^k^-#ag^^ 



:^t=l 



8- 



^^^ 



^? 



t*n« 



Thou art gone to the grave, but we will not de-plore thee; Tho' sor-rows and darkness en - com-pass the tomb ; The Sa-viour has 



i-:^ 



EE^ 



? 



ISZS 



^^_^5g^ 



eE 



H 



P-^=^^ 



^^^^^^^^M 



^ 



-w"^ 



£££ 



f= 



^ I" ^~r 



^Emm^^^s^Em^^^^^^F^m^^^^^nF^^^^^. 



jy 1 1>* \A 



i^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^^^^P 



pnEs'd thro' its portals be -fore thee, And the lamp of his love is thy guide thro' the gloom, And the lump of his life is thy guide thro' the gloom. 
-^ X 1 1 i m u m — i—m 1 — a^ 1 ic ■ ■ ■ iK vm — — IE — ik. i ^~ 



^^igg^ ^^^S! 



m 



^^^i 



^iil^^^^^^g 



2rr 






RyPENTANCi!]. 



M. 



161 



'fe^^fe^ 



a 



:sx 



^si^^S^M^^^i 




spteHi^g^fefe^ 



0, if my soul was form'd for wo, How would I vent my sighs ! Repentance should like nvers flow, From both my streaming eyes. 'Twca for mv sins my 



&: 



i^ 



fT&^F 



p— p- 



P 



*-K-4- 



EE£E£gES 






tB 



^ 



teSEESFEa 



^E^EE 



V 



^"7^ * ~7f?] 






^pp^g^f |^= ^^=E^^!q!:^g^ pf^fg^g|^pg- 



4-— L 



>z^Fp^ |!Egf^ 



TV 



=K 



^: 



israz: 



?' 



^-^-6- 



P 



EFFSE 



dearest Lord Hung on that cursed tree. Hung, &c. And groan'd away his dying life, And groan'd, &c For thee, my soul, for Ihce, For thee, &c. 



:-iijiii: 



^BiPr 



i^H 



r > a. : _ _ rp-pi 




l: 



1614 



BALLSTOWN. L. M 






^^=^^^ 



i tlYg^zg^^^^z^ 



_^i-5- 



ureal God, at - tend while Zion sings The joy that from thy presence springs ; To spend one day vdih thee on earth, Exceeds a thousand 



~P^ 



^=;^i=?^ 



=!S^3£E 



:PE 



EE 



-I I r 



^^^^ 



^ ^^^|i^^^^iEEggfe5^^r.g^E ^p^ 



^^^^?^ 



Lfcl 



:££ 



£^EE 






i 



^^ 



dayt of mirth. 



To spend, &<> 



To spend, &c. 



ESEiL 



? 



zmSZJfL 



■M«Lr2E 



•—•— P' 



I 



^g^ gggg^g g^^^^a 



e 



g:£;£:ipg JE[E ^|?^ _^o-=i|^.;gE|aE^^ 




NEW TOPI A. P.M. 



Munttay 



:6a 



Jggg^^^fegiSa &W ^^^i^^fei 



... . ..„...., . . . "H" ... 



Young people all, attention give, And hear what I do say ; I want your souls in Christ to live, In everlasting day ; Remember, you are hast'ning on. To death's dark, gloomy 



e- — p-p-^p-a- i-p-i 



B 



pci"Bn^ 



PJ^i 



H^ 



iU-P. 



^B^fegrJ^^PpE^g feEp^^fe ^^^ggp^ ^g^F i^T; 



^^g^J^EME^ilj ^-^gi^l^lgg^ B^^ 



^ii^feip^ 



shade Remember, you, &c 



•l — I — I — ^ 



m 



-^ja-p- v- 



^^izJgpF^f^jgg 



Your joys on earth will soon bo gone, Your flesh in dust be laid 



SSp 



-^^^- 



-WZWi 



"rzi—p: 



^^ 



^f 



ffly^ 



gg^g^^^l 



pzzsz 



-^:r-^ 



^ 



f?=S5 



,«-,«-p- 



EFpi 



164 



BABYLONIAN CAPTIVITY. P. M 



iktre 



W^m^^^^^^^^^^^?^^^^ 



r~M llIjl 



g^a^Ei 



^5 



JX. 



=J 



3=ihlt-^^=^^g 



m 



A - loug ihe banks where Babel's cur - rent flows, Our captive bands in deep despondence stray'd, While Zi on'f 



■I 



nr^^- 



^^^ 



EEEF 



fEFEE 



flzs: 



EfrS 



£ 



££?E?: 



J^-t* 



nurzcz: 



lizip: 



=p=r-=F 



:f=:it 



3iz:s: 



^^^^^^^^EfECE^I 



• i I n A 



i^^E 



&^ 



"T r 

■zzj: 



i 



tall ir. sad re - mem - broncc 



Her friends, her children, mingled nith the dead. 






IONIA. 7b. 



J W. Belcher. 



165 



t^[ ri'^-^ ^-ffT77f^ n^m 



—*?-"- V 



K^-V- 



1. Children of the heavenly King, As ye jour-ney, sweetly sing: Sing your Saviour's worthy praise, Glorious in his works and ways 



^-^ 



■^ ^w^ inrrrrj'^r^rrt-^ 



i 



^ 



■^r^ 



2. Ye are travelling home to God, In the way the fathers trod ; They are hap-py now, and ye Soon their hap-pi-ness shall see. 



&^ 



=^^ 



^^ r u - i^pf^ 



b 4 — ^^' ^^-^■ 



'WTL 



WILMOT. 7s. 

Slow. With tenderness and delicacy. 



igi^i)^ 



szit 



^^SZHtZK 



k. V L K 



« — — »—e>' 



W^ 



g^ 



M 



1^ 



s 



>>^-fr--F^ 



aizv: 



£5Ef 



1 — Nij 



1. Sin-ner, art thou still se-cure? WiU thou still re - fuse to pray? Can thy heart or hand en-dure, In the Lord's a - veng-ing day. 



E 



* 



•^ '^ '^ ^ 



^ -S 



3_5zzszn 



2. At his presence nature shakes. 
Earth affrighted hastes to flee ; 
Solid mountains melt like wax, 
What will then become of thee t 



3. Who his coming may abide ? 

You that glory in your shame. 
Will you find a place to hide 

When the world is wrapp'd in flame ' 



4. Lord, prepare us by thy grace. 

Soon we must resign our breath ; 
And our souls be calU'd to pass 
Through the iron gate of death. 



166 



SWEET RIVERS. CM 



More. HapL Harmony, p. 468 



^£^1^^^^;^ 



p: 



^^^ 



jcirw: 



-p"—^ 



-^^^H' 



g=^^ 



^-p= 



I I r _. , 



?^=F 



p^ 



^ 



-- • ig. 



S^^^l 



m PS~ 



— =b^ 



e-H-- 



Bwcet ri TOPS of re - deem - ing love, Lie just be - fore mine eyes, ^ t. i • 

Had I the pi - nions of a dove, I'd to those ri - vers By ; > I d nse su - pe - rior to ity pain, 



:fc> 



SEE 



IZZr-j—Jl 



-P- 



EEl 



l^g^ 



'Ife^-E^^fe^ 



->— ^— f -»i^ 



TdJc: 



EE 



'H* ■ 






->"^ »'- 



I I IZLZIIBX^IIill 



-^— L 



^B: 



e= 



~j» — g 



R^ 



WiJi joy on: - strip the wind, I'd cross o'er Jordan's Btorm 



K 



^^^^feS^^^^^^^ 






•vavcs. And leave the world be - hind, 



L)E LIGHT P. M 



Coa/i. Guiljord, VI. 



\67 



:a±= 



^-P-J=^ 



S 



l^^^^^^^iite^^ 



f^f? 



^^E^^^^E^fe^-gj^^H^lfEpEF^fgE^ 



.?z:szzz:[:sv 



m 



No burning heats by day, Nor blasts of evening air, Shall take my health a - way, If God be witli me there. Thou art my sun and thou my shade. To 



aJ^|^Fl^- ^- [jj ftf fJ L ^ i3^|^ ^E;g 






:f^ 



':^rzrz 



jbih: 



:tt=:^ 



i 



^fegfe 



FE^EEEES 



^^^g^^^^E^^lig^^^g 



te^fb[^iEg^EpE [f> r h- 1 p I. p b^ggSz^iEpg^aEgEF^gjt^^frpFEEgr^ 



guard my head by night or noon. 



Thou art my sun, <fec 



p-f-w- 



-p— ^- 



S— IS 



LT^i" d— S 



^^ifS 3i^Pi ^^Jt^ znz^ijirt :£^:M^ 



^f4^^.? 



S?."^ 



^^^e^^^ 



"f: 



108 



ROCKINGHAM. L. M. 



Lowell Mason. 



£^ fp^ ^i PpjJ4 jJJ ^jffl J=p :FP7r tfTff^ PI^ 



] . Thy praise, O Lord, shall tune the lyre, Thy love our joy - ful songs in-spire ; To thee our cordial thanks bo paid, Our sure defence, our constant aid. 



j^»f=f^ ^ jj^ pE ^H^rrTrr7 ^i ^^ 5fp! pg^ 



■\VTiy then cast down, and why distress'd ? And whence the grief that fills our breast ? In God we'll hope, to God we'll raise Our songs of gra-ti-tude and praise. 



^ 



r-^ 



S=e 



Ff= 



p? 



m^ 



LINDAN. L.M. 



I 1. Lord, when my thoughts delighted ri 



3^ 



rFftrrro^^-^^^^ 



i 



1 . Lord, when my thoughts delighted rove A-mid the won-ders of thy love, Sweet hope revives my drooping heart. And bids iu-trud-ing fears de - part. 



m^'rrin'm 



&k 



^m 



m^ 



e. 



K ~=r 



^S 



2. Kc-pent-ant sorrow fills my heart, But mingling joy al -lays the smart; may my fu-ture life de - clare The sor-row and the joy sin-cere. 




:N5j ^i54-jfp^iy:^^ajTr i i' r rUjj j^^i^a gEjEJE^ft 



3. He all my heart and all my days De - vo - ted to my Saviour's praise ; And let my glad o-bedicnce prove ITow much I owe, how much I love. 



^^^^^ ^gig^S^ ^^^^ 



HUNTINGTON. L. M 



169 



-f Vr I rr 



-p^p^ 



:?ai 



^fe^i 



ip^zs: 



sr-^tzizt 



g^i^l 



p-j-— ^ 



l"!]!! 



I^^= 



F^^^'^P'^^J^ii^ibfa^ii^T^J^^^E^ 



Lord, what a thoughtless wretch was I, To mourn, and murmur, and re - pine ; To see the wicked placed on high, In 






-^ 



J L 



-^- 



^ 



FtEEE^ 



EdgEfE^pEfEPgEg^^ 



i:^: 



PJ^P^?|g^g^ g| ^ S^ 



jsr 



-^- 



-^-i — ^ 



-^^ 



sz±i 



p]j i: 



-i I r I -i— - r-r h-h- 



ffi 



1-ptpt 



irr 






iz: 



j^j^jaV 



Fl^=l^ 



'r~\ r 

pride and robes of honour shine But O their end ! their dreadful end! Thy sanctuary taught me go; 






E^ 



±£=s 



2S 



F^ ^^^gJ^ pPi^- 



I 



^ ^'zrt^T?gqj |^fi77 ^ .g^ ^^^= iz|St F' j^^ 



jyn 



HUNTINGTON. Condudea 



/oTD'/rrv 



V^FP? 



^ES-^^^E!^^^^^^^|^-r 



» — • 



£?" 



ozr^ ■azr«:s:s±z: czzz 



:^=q- 



^ 



aS^^§^ 



=^ 



^H 



On sbp - pciy rocks I see them stanJ, And fiery billowa 



^=--=P=p ^EfE£;fEEfeFrpfe-ggEg|^^ 



tp' 



pa 



^^^^=H 



P' *" 






j^r-j 



^ 



^^^^ ^^ ^^^pfegfe tt 



MONTGOMERY. C. M. 



More. 



^^^^te^-te 



m^ 



¥ 



-ir^ 



E 






-^rP- h-VV 



!r^= 



^^iSs^E^^^S^^^^S 



-P- 



Early, my God, without delay, I haste to seek thy face , My thirsty spirit faints a 



With 



ln^^^^i 



P^^EE^SeES 



Et 



-^ -^ }^-h= 






^E 



EEE5:: 



^^ 






-p- 



jQ^ 



MONTGOMERY. Concluded. 



171 



^^ 



^-^^gEi£EEg;i^^|^jE F;^^^ 



^ 



IPIfl^ 



E 



— • 1 — I — I — I — 



etj: 



e 



^ 



^^ii3E_^Ete?l 



out thy cheering grace ; So pilgrims on the scorching sand, 



Beneath a burning sky, 



±lf^ 



^^-g^PpE^F^^F^ 



Long for a 



^^E^S^^^^^^l^^^^^^i^ 



-f^ 



-ftZKI 



I I ! r~ 



:P" 



:E£^^p:^^i^JE|^ 



^i^^ 



s 



=^ 



^z^Ei 



cooling stream at hand. And they must drink or die, 

• • 



^^^^^^^^iE^^^^fe 



^ 






^E^SBIP 



Efeffe 



b£ 



m 



fF?= 



1= -^^-^^ 



iEf£$: 






^S3f 



ITU 



HUMBLE PENITENT. L. M^ 



Wm. Walker. 




I^^S 



1. Show pi - ty, Lord, Lord, for - give, 

Let a re - peat - ing re - bel live ; pi - ty me, dear Sa - viour 

Chorus. 1 H ChoruK. 



pi - ty me, dear Sa - viour ! 1 



Is there n - ny mer - cy here, 



^^^gS 



^^m 



if 



tF 



*==t 



12. Are not thy mer - cies large and free ? 
May not a sin - ner trust in thee ? 



r 

pi - ty me, dear Sa - viour! 1 t »i i. ». 

n 1; .1 ~„ A <!„ ■ , t S- Is there a - ny mer - cy here, &o. 

O pi - ty me, dear Sa - viour ! J j j t 






^ 



^ 



^S: 



t ^^^^fr^^f^^^tzmm 



pi - ty me, dear Lord, and I'll sing hal - le hal - le - lu - jah ! 



m^^ 



*& 



R 



#^ 




^ 



I 



^^^j 



3. My crfmeB are preat, bnt don*t surpass 

O pity me, dear Sariour, 
Tho power and plory of thj i:r?.»ye; 
pity me, dear Saviour, Ac. 

4. Great Qod, thy natnre bath no bouDd, 

pity me, dear Saviour, 
So let thy pard'nin;; lore be found, 
O pity me, dear Saviour, ixi, 

6. 1 wash my soul from every sin I 
O pity mo, dear Saviour, 
And make my guilty consctrnce deant 
pity me, dear Saviour, 4c. 

6, Here on my heart the burden Ilea, 

O pity me, dear Saviour, 
And past offenrM pain my eyes, 
i^ty me, dear Saviour, Ac 

7. Btly lips with shame my olns oonfeas, 

pity me, dear Saviimr, 
Apiinst thy law, against thy f;rsoe; 
pity me, deai- ;»aTioiir, Ac 



8. Lorrr, should thy Judgments groTrseTere, 

O pity me, dear Saviour, 
I am cnndemn'd. hut thou art clear. 
O pity me, doar Saviour, Ac 

9. Should sudden venireanco seize my breath, 

pity me, dear Saviour. 
I must pronounce thee just In death 
O pity me, dear Saviour, Ac 

10. And if my soul were sent to hell, 

O pity me, dear Saviour, 
Thy riirhteous law approves It welL 
pity me, dear Saviour, Ac 

11. Yet save a trembUnR Finner, Lord, 

O pity me, dear Saviour, 
Whose hope, still hov'ring round thy word) 
O pity me, dear Siivivnir, Ac 

12. Would light on some Bwe«t promise tftere, 

O pity me, desr Saviour. 
Borne sure tiU)>port a;^lDfft despair, 
pity me, dMU* Savicur. Ac 



^^-^ 



Ef-S 



UXBRIDGE. L. M. 

'i 



ITS 



2 



m 



m 



F=^^ 



tZJ 



rmr 



it: 



Sweet is the -work, my God, my King, To praise tliy name, give tlianlis, and sing. To show thy love by moMiing light, And talk of all thy truths at night. 



IJ XE 



^^^^^^m 



¥W='- 



2. Sweet is the day of aa-credrcst,Na.mortaI cares shall seize my breast: may my heart in tune be found, Like David's harp of so-lemn sound! 



ga^i ^P 



szs: 



i^ 



is 



3 



3. My heart shall triumph in my Lord, And bless his works, and bless his word ; Thy works of grace, how bright they shine 1 How deep thy counsels ! how divine I 

SOLITUDE NEW. C. M. 



— t — " 



rf»-az^-:r-Hi 



ICIgfl 



-tz 



fe^E^ 



f-FFp- 



Efe^^^teSSE^=^ 



^^35iEfef33 



-o- 



tSiiaEEiiEE^ 



;^^: 



STi^: 



My refiwe i? 'ic God cf love ; My foes insult and cry. Fly like a tjm'rous, trembling dove. Fly like a tim'rous, trembling dove, Fly like a 



lS ^ferFg;gf|EEfe^ 



E—CZr-C 



F=F 



yjg- 



I 



-— p- 



i'VZZ-~P f"^ TZ^ ZX 



v\~ — i<'1"i — * 



zzr~ f 



;s_i=rH=riciH; 



i^"^^ 



"P^ 



zizzd: 



:^EZE 



i74 



SOLITUDE NEW. ConcluOen 



' ^i^---:—-=^ -'E^^p^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ f^E^^^^ ^^^ ' 



i 



r^-T=^=i: 



S 



^£^33 



£ 



Ircmblir.g, lim'rous dove, To (lis - tant moun - tains fly, Since I have plaMil my 



' trust in God, A refuge uwaya lugh. 



■tE 



fe^ 



:piK 



£B 



ap 



nzE 



!iE= 



EC^ 



gEE^^[^E^EgE^pE^FEF 



EIMIB 



^fe^ffi 



2EFF 



^gy^^^i^^^EiE^ii^^^ip^^^i 



^^fe^-^i^i^^=^^^^sEsS 



._t^_ 



Why should I like a tim'rous bird, To dis - tant mountains dy, 



i 



W- 



i!=lfc 



.^^^ 






■p-w- 

_rz:ir_: 



ZZ1Z_L 



MOUNT ZION. S. M. 



S—^ 



=F=F=E 






jgg^^g 



tt 



=E 



:=E£^ 



Brw.un. ; 75 



ix: 



P^=i^^^g ^^'FB^g3^£^ N; J=^-3=^4^--ibt:^ ^ 



:s:j:3: 



The hill of Zi - on yields A thousand sa - cred swee ts, liefore wc reach the hcav'nly fields, Or walk the golden streets. 



= 8— « 



f-\ 



:-H& 









"I y 



^i^^^^^ 



— ^- 






?5~3EEp-^-^ 



I 



^~i — y 



F-^ 



EES 



:S^1 



£^^£^i 



i 



i^|^^|^^^^p^i^_EEEJ^. 



Then let your ". songs abound, An d ev'ry tear be dry; We're marching through Immanuel's ground. 




To fairer worlds on hign. 









176 



MOUNT ZION. S M. Conchtd.a. 



i^g^Epi^ ^PPi^^ ^gi^^^S'-^^ 



"&-- 



ir=,=SEl^ 



3^SE3E|; 



3^ 






We're marching throagli Immaniicrs ground, To fairer worlds oil high, 



^^3E:^^^=fz^. 









=£gp^^£pS'£gE[^^ ^^P^ g^i 



es^ezii 






^P^IPI^^I^^^^^^ 



:3^^ 



Ji^zzirz 



:£S=Bi-?i 



-^ — ^ 



E£E j^&=^S3E^ 



— -r ^r — 1?~ 






9 — ' — '^^ — - 

fiur - ar worlds on high. We're marching through Im - raa - nucl's ground. To fair - cr worlds on iukIl 



■ a -L, — L — ^.^ a_ 



E^^i 



icmc-pz^ 



j=F=g-^^ ^p|>-'^=|=j^ 



fc:— 



^"-P= 



■^ -^np 



-r-t- 



m^EM^m^^^^^^^^^^^m. 



EDOM. C. M. Sharp Key on F 



ir7 



^ 



^S^^E^EEt^i 



i^EEl 



\^^^- 









^^^^^Egffi^teE^^^ 



With 8ong» and honours sounding loud, Ad - dress the Lord on high, Over the heav'ns he spreads his clouds. And waters veil the 



^ 



~^=ZWZ^ 



-^-^ 



:El=^ 



■^- 



HS 



-^l 



E^^ 



P5=Ff^ 



=?=f:^ 



g£^ 



"Q - • r 



32: 



^S 



JEjEEjEE^^^JE ^HajqZ iE 



xzj: 






^"S^eSeB^^ 



sky, And 



-^-F^ 



-- £s 



wa • tcrs 



veil the skV' 



He sends his show rs of bless - inffs down To cheer the plains he- 



>T 



wBt^ 



lile^^ 



izinz 



— l^ — I a — I , — , — : 



KtT. 



14 



T=^ 



±=:z± 



17?* 



EDOM Concludefl. 



i^^^te^^^g^E^^g^^^^^ll 



i^^p 



I •*> \ 



:^^ 



-f^w-w 



rzwzni^ 



i^Sii"^^E^[p 



<^ 



low ; He makes the grass the mountains crown, And com in valleys grow. He makes, &c 



And com. &c 



o~ 



:!=zxr 



i^- 



tozfc 



-g-rr-»: 



fe^lE rfin^^ -^g g^Bggi tt 



SCHENECTADY. L. M. 



W- 



bt^iib 



>=> 



r~f~!*~!*~jz 



-^^ 



«ii; 



^F^l^rr j^rp ^ff^p^ ^ 



Shumwuy. 



^Sgg 



"E I ^ — 



.-tE^=nrjzj=:jz^ H=jEpg 



-^- 



I <•>:; 



^i 



"g~r 



^blL^^S 



From all that dwell below the skies. Let the Cre - ator's praise arise ; Let the Redeem - cr'a name be sung. Through ev'iy land by er'ry 



^^l=ff5IP= 



-5*-^ 



fe-^ 



-^— P^ 



!^: 



¥=¥J^'f^ 



^si 



g^^gE^^^Ej 



-^^F>- 



B^ 



xin 



F?^^^t#^3Efe^^ 



SCHENECTADY. L. M. Coniintiea 



:^=f 



g^:^lF= 



— !© — — -O- 



EtE^fe3El&£=L^ 



?9 



;£?E 



S^^fe^i^^^^SSi^g^ 



tongue. Eternal are thy mercies. Lord, Eternal truth attends thy word ; Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore, 



il 



S^ 






^EEEEp3!=f- 



I 






iii=gy ^fe hfJ-rU^ 



-^-1»- 



J-d-i 



shall rise and set no more. 



—P^ 



-j P P- 



Till su^i s^jjl rise and set no more. 



^^ 



^ 



-Qi 



f=tj!; 



^^£ 



IE 






ISO 



OCEAN 



•Vuian. 






Thy works of glory, mighty LorJ, That ral'st the boist'rous sea, The sons of courage shall record, Who tempt the dang'rous way. At thy command the winds arise. And 



5g|:aF|gl^-pg feg^S:^g^ggg|ife^'^ 



J-iC 



'^r 






g^j^ -p-^^g^^fegj^^^ ^^^-gg^^P^I 




fe^s£ii^^ffi^g^tec^^teiEE#i[| 



^Is^^^^teil^p^yi 



The men istonish'd mount the skies, And sink in g^P • '"B grave*. 



^g ^^fe^fe ^^fe 



^;-^^^FF->^— >^ -fc-p =^=F=^ 



Kp" 



l^i^^iilS'^i^gid 



AZMON. C. M. 



^^^^Pfr^^^^^ j gg 



Arranged from Glaner. 181 

COT'A.— Do not sing the ocia to the 1st anci :!■! v»rsM^ 




3. Down from the shining seats above 
With jojful haste he fled, 
Enter'd the grave in mortal flesh. 
And dwelt among the dead. 



4. Oh ! for this love let rocks and hills 
Their lasting silence break, 
And all harmonious human tongues 
The Saviour's praises speak. 



5. Angels, assist our mighty joys : 
Strike all your harps of gold ; 
But when you raise your highest notes 
His love can ne'er be told. 



ETON. 7s. (Double.) 



Firm and distinct. 




1. 'Vnde, ye heavenly gates, unfold, Closed c 
Uurk I th' angel-ic host in-quirej Who i:- 



^TrYf i ° ^i\ti^ m f ftf^rrrm 



; by death and sin; Lo! the conq'ring Lord be -hold. Let the King of glo - ry in. Ilal-lo - u - jahl 
he th' almighty King? Hark, again, the answering choir, Thus in songs of tri-umph sing. 

T).C. . — - 



bal-U • lu - jahl 



^^ 



& 



m 



^ 



m- 



^r^=:si::s 



?P* 



^3 



'-^ 



nzl: 



J foea des-truction hurl'd; lie who hath the victory won. Ho who saved a min-ed world; — \IIalle-lu- jaht 
,r-aateWord ; Ue, whose truth with blood was seol'd ; lie ia henv'n's aJl-glorioua Lord, j 



hal-le* la - jahl 



^^:^t^:^^^3^ lT^^^|^=^ ^ l[l L^ 



=FP 



THE SAILOR'S HOME. L. M. 




By Wm. M. Caudill and Win. Walker. 



^eI 



K — ft- 



B 



1. AVh«n for e - tcr - nal worlds we steer, And seas are calm, and skies are clear, 1 _,„ .„„, ,_ . _ .i,„„ .i„„„ t,„. „:„™ *„j i„„,i i,„_ 

R.J...,.,. , ■ « I J- 4 » un ^ n ■ > rhe soul, for joy tnen claps ber wings. And loud ner 

And faith in liTe - ly ex - er - cisc, And dis - tant hills of Ca-naan rise. J > j j r o . 

fc^^^ =-T n^in ^ 1 — —r^ - _ t' ^ 



^^^\t^r ^^=^ ^=^ M'l^^^^X^t^^ 



TTn" 



m 



~^~ L 



1. fl 1th cheer-ful hope, his eyes ex-plore Each land-mark on the dis-tant shore : 1 , . - . t,i_i,_- jjiii, 
~. . <• v/ L\. L rr. L t . 1 V u. <• 1 >A-Kain for joy she plumes her wings. And loud her 

The trees of life — the pas - ture green, The crys - tal stream, do - light-ful scene : / ° * ^ ' ° 



e 






^i^^^^s 



-t^ 



3. The near-er still she draws to land, More eag - er all her pow'rs ex-nand : I ,, , . u<-iii. • % a %. 

AYith stead -y helm, and free bent sail, Her aS-chor drops with - in the vail :} ^°<^ °°^ ^°'' J'^ she folds her wings. And her ce- 



^ 



^^ 



love - ly son - net sings, I'm go - ing home, I'm go - ing home, And loud her love - ly son - net sings, I'm go - ing home. 



^ 



kr- 



-¥=^ 



^ 



s 



ES 



^^1^ 



loTe - ly son - net sings, I'm al - most home, I'm al - most home. And loud her love - ly son - net sings, I'm al- most home. 



3^s g ^ ^^; g^ gB ^j ^ ?n-T ^ gpg ^ga 



les - tiat tiou - net sings, I'm home nt Inst, I'm home nc 

Arohnd the dear ItpdermtT'i' fi-ot, 

AnJ loud tbey ttbouU Our Guil And KhikC, 



last, Ami hor ce - les - tinl son - net sings, Tm heme at last 



^ 



.JL-P. 



^ h^ 



PETERBOROUGH. C. M. 



Baptist Harmony, p. 2. 



183 






MIIE 



&^ 



s 



e^t 



1. Approach, my soul, the mer - cy scat, "WTiere Je - sua an • swers prayer; There hum-bly fall be • fore his feet. For none 



^=T^-4H 



^:sz£ 



per - Ish there. 

1 2. 



^F fefMN^ ffrt r i ^Tf NP I 



2. Thy pro-mise ia my 



ly plea, With this I ven - turo nigh: Thou caU'st the burdea'd soul to thee. And 



^^^ 



^^ 



::rM 



Lch, Lord, am I. 

1 2 



8=^ 



n 



•gr-^- 



E 



Ei 



^ 



i 



3. Bow'd down beneath a load of s 
By Satan sorely prept. 



4. Be thou my shield and hiding-place, 
That, shelter'd near thy side, 
I may my fierce accuser (kce. 
And tell him thou hast died. 



6. O, wondrous Iotb! to bleed and die, 
To bear the cross and shame, 
That t;uilty sinners, such as I, 
Might plead his gracious name. 



6. "Poor tempcst-toss'd soul, be still. 
My promised grace receive ;" — 
Tia Jesus speaks — I must, I will, 
I can, I do believe. 



CLAREMONT. 



^^^^^Be^S^^^^^^SP 



s^^ffeFasEgi 



ass 



Vital fpark of heav'nly flame, Quit, quit this mortal frame ; Trembling 



£&?^ 



^i3 



0-r~ 



m 



B=^ 



=ff¥ 






fe£fe^;^j5t grrfn=^ ^^^ 



hoping, ling'ring, flymg, flying^ fly - ing, O ! the pain, the bliss of dying 

n 



nccT!:^^:^: ■ 






rP-^-Qg-i 



m 



EEffla?^: 



E|^i^^^[i^gg^E^^-5;feSfl 



t84 



CLAREMONT. Continued 



p s^?mm?!^ mm^^f^^msm^^^^^m^^^^ 






^i^^i^fe^g?^ 



it 



Cease, fond nature, cease thy strife. And let me languish into life ; And let me languish into life. 



^eS 




Hark ! they whisper ; angels say, Sister spirit, come awa» 



i^Sg^l 



=Fv= 



-^-•- 



nzic 



its: 



:pi=: 



^— ^ 



:^FtEE 



ra^^ 



WZL 



^E^f: 



^ 



£ii 



5? 



Si 



^ 



ss: 



-P-F 



=^ 



1 >^. I 



";s;;j=¥ 



£ 



Hark ! they whisper ; angels say. Sister spirit, come away ; Sister spirit, como away. What is this absorbs me quite— -Steals my senses, ihiitA my sight ' 



p gi^;£^:^^^g=|g^|^^-fef^ g^gg££E^£^3r: 



TiV »*[ T ^~^ .»"»T- "~^~~t o. 



^>^ 



-w-w- 



ia~r~ r 



^^fiS ^M^ 



CLAREMONT. Contifiued. 



185 



£^l g^:g£gfef;^"feE^^Ei^ 



SS 






tel^ 



-• — 1-— i-J- 



13=3 



^^^^^i^j^N^f^^^bp^^jfa 



tzzc 



Drowns my spirit, draws my hreath, Tell me, my soiil, c»n this be <Ieath ! :1 






-^-^♦- 



EE 



£: 



|EpE^|:mcf^pl^E 



vsicn 



i^V^ 






^^^^^^ 



^"^^^=Rq=p=r[ 



isiP: 



EE 



s 



;e 



^eS 



^-^^lff^^^-F |: 



^dzgfaj^^^^^^-ijjrdi^:^ 



rfir- 



The world recedes, it dis - ap - pears, HeaVn opens on my eyes. My ears with sounds seraphic ring. My ears with sounds seraphic 



G:.l:^r^l£=F4n ^i^m 



'^^-H 



:fc±£L 



m 



fEH^^ Fffgri 






186 



CLAREMONT, Co«/m«ea 



^ii^;^^ 






m§^ 



M 



i^^^^ 



g^P 



Lend, lend your wings ! I mount, I fly! I mount ! I fly ! U grave ! where is thy 




M^^-U 



^^ ^^f^^^ ^^^^M 






victory 1 thy vie - to - ry ? O grave ! where ia tliy victory 1 thy vie - to - ry 1 O death ! where is thy sting 1 Lend, lend your wings ! 1 mount ! I fly ! I mount ! I fly ! I 



-♦-t» 



fl^ 



;r?= 



rzLzr: 



3S 



^ 



-P^ 






^g^S^lg 






K.t 



Ti^.qtfcppJ^^EIE 



:tidtf 



iSi 



P? 



^^ 4>-*^. ■ '• 






GLARKMONT. Concluded 



187 



E^^SesI^ 



tff: 



"^^ 



^ffiEFFE? 



^^F^iSl^^f^B 



fe^a3=^j^jt^!^fegg&g=j=j-H-^-^^^^ 



rqr 



V^'^ 



mount! I fly, I fly ! grave, where ia thy victory t O death, where is thy sting 1 I mount, I fly, I mount, I fly ! grave, where is thy victory 1 O death, where is thy sting i 



1 , 1 1- -I— L— 

5 



gEg:T|-^t^gEFf;fe:^E5ggfi^g|^fe:-j^ ^^:?ft 






:P-t:t 



L> ♦ 



:«=p£rtE 



^ 



IZE 



:S=S 



-^ 



-W=WU 



^fl 



FUNERAL ANTHEM. 



Rev. chap. xiv. ver. 13. Billings. 




-fl- 



"LJ-HTCr 



n. 



TJ—P- 



drP- u rrt -i 



"ri-rj- 



I heard a great voice from hcav'n, saying unto me, Write, From henceforth, write, from, &c., write. From, &c Blessed arc the dead that die in the Lord. 



"I 1 '- — ' 



:^:»50 



-?^ 



len 



FUNERAL ANTHEM. Coimuae* 



gpp:r^Pf^| =jj3gagg|3P5p$ggEJ$ip; 



Xz 



"3^ 



ItSEP^^^I 




ig^^ps^s^^j"^^^ 



Yea, saith the Spirit, for they rest, 



for they rest 



for they 



rest. for they rest from their labours, from their labours; 



fe 



^= 



^Z^rlfEEFl; 



EE 



;S^sEeB 



iBzziiir 



E^Ep 



iS^IiT 



--^ 



EEFp 



L^^§-| 



-p— p— a ^ r^~^~f 



O^— 






FEP=P=^ 



-p— 5- 



^^ 



-»— ^-tT<- 



^S 



IP 



:z.-g't~- I — ^ 



5^; 






^^^^^^S^^ 



from the ir la - bours anj their works, which do fol - low, fol - low, fol - low, which do fol - low, fol - low theu. Which do follow them. 



-a- 



~^—*-- 



■ 



nr 



Lzz^^ 



'EE^EE± 



-p— p- 



-pa- |B- 



Pife 



SL-^nini::;; 



EASTER ANTHEM 



Young's Night Thoughts ; 4tli ^Nignt. Hilhn^'i. 



189 



^^ — -- 



r^^ir 






-^:^^ 






— #■ 



^H^ 






The Lord is ris'n jdio • deed! 



r4 



H^ 



^[^-F^^jB 



le • lujah ! The Lord is ris'a in - deed ! Hal - le - lu - jah ! 



it-^ 



¥^ 



T -^ — I — r- 



^^'^''f^l 






:^ii: 



^^ 



^I^P^ 



£ 



Fm 



Lsg 



^ 



[— V: 



:tfc:fcr«- 



.t:^ 






:iz:r 



l^lfeg 



Now is Christ ris'n from the dead, And become the firsl-fruit of them that slept. Now is Christ, &c. 






f^^SS^Ss§ 



te 



! a— ^ — H — — 



^tatiF 



190 



BASTER ANTHEM. Cmimuea 



ecM^P^ 



^^^^^^^^■^ 






^sM 



ll^^Sigi 



HalUi - lujah, balle • lujah, halle lu - jah. And did he rise 1 And did he rise 1 And diilihe rise 1 



did bo rise ? hear it, ye 



^^^^^^s^^^^^^^m 



gggggg^ 



p 



EEEEEEF^SEE 



s^^^fe 



;|g^ 



£ 






Hg^ 



KpaEEEiaM^t^ 



Mff 



a ^^Esggi 



Hgg^ggSppgifl 



nations ! hear it, O ye dead ! He rose, 



:|: He burst the bars of death ! 



And triumpU'd o'er the grave. 



~riy^^y 



PH 



P^ 



grv: 






>-|" 



^g^Q!"|>y 



itl 



Si^f^g 



^-^- 



EfefrM- 



tr^^^=^ 



;5.-*- 



hf=r-?ihicri 



^^f^^l^i^Sg^H^ 



EASTER ANTHEM Continued 



i9r 



'S 






E=^3 



^s 



i^^?=5=FP=^F 



;pgp^=r^^F=:zfLzp^^p=-yzp 



£Et 



;^ 



Then, then, 



then I rose, then 



E3=FP^^?t^f°= 



rose, then I rose, 



then first hu- 



:E£E^ 



:P=p: 



=F 



^^ 



^i: 



-K- 



&EEE 



a^liE^Ef^^ 



I 



^B^^ 



5^ 



^4 



■F?=F 



f^Ei 



-P 



g^ 



^ 



e « » 



zz:i^k-k.^S^'~"^ 



ic» izs: 



as 



:^nsr 



ftz5 



:$=t 



-l^CIZISL 



& 



Sl^JE 



e^felEf^ 



manity triumphant past the crystal poits of light, 



and seiz'd 



ter - nal youth. 



Man all im • mortal hail, 






EE 



^-^ 



Tn 



^^EIEfet 



zn 






>=fct»: 



1E3^IS1 



^ 



*=^^-^--lE£&+ 



±^Et 



t^Tr»»: li*: 



192 



fi ASTER ANTHEM. Condudea. 



iE=fel=EE=^ 



^- 



— r 



^^^^^^E^gl 



^ 






£S 



vii? 



^E 



E3: 



:5E| 



? 



-r-pB- 



^ 



3JS31 



JtCJgl 



E 



i 



hail, Heaven, ad lavish of strange gifts to man, Thine's all the glory, man's the boundless bli^ ; Thine's all the glory, man's the boundless bliss. 

:5zEhE 



— s»~i^ 



E^^^E^s^^tesf 



£g 



fz^ 



:ffi 






:^S 






E^ESEl 



Eg^p^ 



HARWELL. 8,7,7. 



^^ See he sitB. 4c. ^ W \ W '^ W W 



1 Snn nU the □ 
; JuKus reigi 






See, he sits on yonder tht 









lefl tbn world alone. Ilal-le* lu-jah! baMe-lu-jafa t hal-le -lu-Jabl A • men. 

IJi L 




i^-^^^§ 



BOUND FOR CANAAN. 7,6 

1 a ruoni 



Mercers Cluster, p. 350 



E. J. King. 



-^:P- 



■-H- 



j^lg 





S^^^^^g 



Oh when ehnll I see Je-su?, And reiurn with him a-bove? ) „ * /^ t* 

And from the flowing fountain, Drink ever - last-ing love ? / I m on my way to Canaan, I m on my way to Canaan, Fm on my way to Ca-naan, To the New Je-ru - Ba lom. 

1 a N 



^ga^ igap ^jg^E^gf i^^^ 



INVOCATION. 8,7. 




1. Je - sus, grant U3 all a bless-ing. Send it down, Lord, from a-bove ; I „ „ u .,. .. „ • . m-,, „ , „ 

Maywe all re-turn home pray-ing, And re - joic-ing in thy love :/ ^'''"'''^''''' ""*'''""''''''''"■''" ^''"'^"' ^'^^ ^^ all shall meet a - gain. 




e^ 



15 



2 Jesus, pardon all our follies, 

Since together we have been ; 
Make us humble, make iis holy. 
Cleanse us *U fiom every sin : 
Farewell, brelkreu ; farewell, sisters, 
Till we all shall meet abov«. 



3. May thy blessing, Lora, go with us 
To each one's respective home : 
And the presence of our Jesus 

Rest upon us every one : 
Farewell, brethren ; farewell, sisters. 
Till we all shall meet at home. 



^m^ 




IN THAT MORNING. 



L.Al 



Wm. Walker. 



E2 






1. Je-sns, my all, to hcay'n is gone, Aird we'll all shoat to-geth-er in that morn-ing ; ■( 
Uc whom I fix my hopes up - on, And we'll all shout to - geth - er in that morn-ing. / 



In that morn-ing, in that 




^F^^F^ 



2. His track I see, and I'll pur - sue, And we'll all shout to - geth - er in that morn-ing ; "1 
The nar - row way, till him I view, And we'll all shout to - geth - er in that morn-ing. / 



In that morn-ing, So. 




morn-ing. And we'll all shout to-geth - er in that morning. 




^: ^^^^fe fesi 



4-'.-^ 



ziz!Lir3izrV":k±ii5L v«i.. > "_" lJ_i _ 



3. The way tho holy prophets went, 

And we'll all shout together. 4c 

The road that lends from banishment, 

And we'll all shout togt-ther, Ac 

4. The Kin^'a highway of holiness. 

And we'll ail shout together, 4c. 
I'll po. for all hid paths are peace, 

And we'll all shout together, 4c. 
6. This Is the wav I long hiTc sought, 

And we'll all sh^ut topether. Ac. 
And mourn'd bec-aase I found it not; 

And we'll all shout together, 4c 

6. My grief a burden long has been, 

And we'll all shout tOK«'ther, Ac. 

Because I wr^s nnt 8aTed from sin; 

And we'll all shout together, Ar, 

7. The more I strove against iU power, 

And well «U shout together, Ac. 

I felt its weight and n"ilt the more; 

Aud wu'll iLlI »huut logeUutr. Ac 



8. Till late I heard my SaTlour kij. 

And we'll all shout together. Ac. 

•'Come hither, soul. I am the way," 

And we'll all shout together, Ac. 

9. Lol gl.id I come, and thou, blest Lamb, 

And we'll all shout together, Ac 

Shalt take mo to thee, whoKe I am; 

And we'll all shout together, Ac, 

10. Nothing but pin have I to give, 

And we'll all shout together. Ac. 
Nothing but lore sh.-dl I rereive: 
And we'll all shout fogether, Ac 

11. Then will I tell to sinners round. 

And we'll all shout together. Ac, 

What a Utvir S-iriour I haTe found; 

And «V1I all shout together, Ac 

12. ni point to Ihv redeeming love. 

And we'll a'i shout together. Ac. 

A lid *^:ty. ■' Heboid tho way to Ood I 

\iid wo'U «U dicut to£elh«r. A«. 



THE MORNING TRUJVIPET. 



Ji F. Wliite. 




1. Oh wheQ shall I see Jesus, And reigQ with him above? And shall hear tbe trumpet sound in that morning. "1 g,, ,. ulo-rv'for T kI all 
And from the flowing fountain, Drink everlasting love? And shall hear the trumpet sound in that morning. / ' b j- 




When shall 
And with my 



I be de-li-ver'd From this vain world of sin? And shall hear the trumpet sound in that morning. ■) g[^g„. n irlo - rv ' for I shill 
y blessed Jesus Drink endless pleasures in? And shall hear the trumpet sound in that morning. / ' b j • 





^^g tf^g^fea 



mount above the skies, When J hear the trumpet sound in that morning. 



:^=g ^ _g_g^^^ 





2. But now I am a soldier, 

My Captain's gone before; 
He's given me my orders. 

And bids me ne'er give o'er; 
Ilis promises are faithful — 

A righteous crown he'll givOk 
And all his valiant soldiery 

Eternally shall live, 
Shout, &c. 

3. Through grace I ffeel det«rmiued 

To conquer, through I die, 
And then away to Jesus, 

On wings of love I'll fly : 
farewell to sin and sorrow, 

I bid them both adieu! 
AikI my friends, prove faithful. 

And on your way pursue. 
Shout, &o. 



4. Wheii.e'er you meet with troubles 

Ani trials on your way, 
XheB. cast your care on Jesus, 

And don't forget to pray. 
Gird on the gospel armuur 

Of faith, and hope, and love, 
And when the combat's ended. 

He'll carry you above. 
Shout, &o. 

5. Oh do not be discouraged. 

For Jesus is your friend ; 
And if you lack for knowledge, 

He'll not refuse to lend. 
Keither will he upbraid you, 

Though often yo'i request. 
He'll give you grace to conquer, 

And take you home to rest. 
Sbout. &s 



WorOs br Ker. Wm llunUr. 




?^F=F 



DRUMMOND. lis. 

"TvU my brethr«a that I died at my post." — Last w^yrds of Rev Tlto^nas I>ruiixmond. 



Treble by Wm Hbuser. 



¥^ 



1. A -way from his home and the fricDOs of his youth. He hast-ed, the her - aid of mer - cy and truth, For the love of his 




12. The stran-ger's eye wept, that in life's brightest bloom One gift - cd so high - ly should sink to the tomb ; For in or- der he 



^^ 



^=i 



^ 



T~Z 



S^^ 



:^=i 



-= — ik--h^ 



Z3 \ L_ 



3. He wept not him - self that his war - fare was done ; The bat - tie was fought, and the vie - to - ry won : But he whis-per'd of 
4 He agk'd not a stone to be sculptured with verse ; lie ask'd not that fame should his me - rits rehearse ; liut he ask'd, as a 




Lord, and to seek for the lost ; Soon, a - las ! was his fall — but he died at his post, Soon, a - las ! was his fall — but he died at his post 



^^^ 



is>ir 



-^s-~ar 



sraci 



m 



■^i-p- 



f=E=^ 



1 1 r 

led in the van of the host. And he fell like a gol-dier — he died at hjs post, Aiid he fell like a sol-dier — he died at his post 



r:? 



-±JL 



zIzm: 



Hhr-W- 



3Lis: 






those whom his heart clung to most, ** Tell mjbrctliren, for me, thftt I died at my post," " Tell my brethren, for me, that ] died at iny post' 
boon, when he gave up the ghost, That his brethrea might kaow that he died at his post, Xh&t his bretiireja might kuow that he died at his puat. 



6. Victorious his fall — for he rose as be foil, 
Wilh Jesus, his Master, in plory to dwell; 
He ha.'^ piuis'd o'er the stream, uri'l has reatU'd the bright cu&sC^ 
fur Utf feU like a martyr — ho died at his post. 



G. And ciui we the words of his exit forget? 
Oh, no I they ure fr««h in onr memory yet : 

An example so brilliiUit shall never be k'SU 

We ttiU 1*)J i/) the worV— we wi;i Jio at oar DO«t 



MISSIONARY SONG. 8,7,4. 



Slow and Ann 



S. B. Pond, priiicipdUy . 



197 



ImM 




1. O'er the gloom-y hilia of darkness, Look, my soul! be still and gftze; All the pro-mi - ses do tra-vail With a glo-rious day of grace: 





Let the Indian, let the Negro, 
Let the rude barbarian see 

That divine and glorious conquest 
Once obtain'd on Calvary ; 

Let the gospel, 
Loud resound from pole to pole. 



Kingdoms wide, that sit in darkness. 
Grant them. Lord, the glorious light. 

And from eastern coast to western 
May the morning chase the night: 

And redemption 
Freely purchased, win tie day. 



4. 

May the glorious day approaching, 
On the grossest darkness dawn; 

And the everlasting gospel 

Spread abroad thy holy name — 

All the borders 
Of the great Emmanuel's land. 

.5. 

Fly abroaa, thou mighty Gospel, 
Win and conquer, never cease ; 

Slay thy lasting, wide dominions 
Multiply and still increase ; 

Sway the sceptre. 
Saviour, all the world around 



198 



NEVER PART AGAIN. CM. 

Cbomn. 



gss^^^s 



ghaycuncnd? Thy joys, when phalli pee? 




i-lem, my happy hnme, Oh how I lone for theo! 1 We'ro marching thro' Emmnnuers ground; 



& 



aSf^^EEgEE? 



S ri 11 




We soon shall bear tho weloome trumpet sound.— 



Oh, there we shAll with Jesus dweU, A n J 






1 com? after nio. f "^-^ " ™»'''=1^2' *<=• 



i^^^f^ 



3IZZ 



NK K >i ' 



~1 p*! ! |^ 



gE^ggP^S^^ 



i:t5± 



leach dowti, Ixtrl, thine arm nf(:rrnce, And cau-^ me to BF-<x-nd l .„ , .. ^ 

Where congregatioiifl ne'er breelt up, And >:ab-baths noTCir end. / » « r« morcting, »c 



=^ 



nr 



»~ a~9~s~' ar 



^ 



■^■»«i>*^l 



[SSS 



i^s^s^ 



^ 




■ part a • gain : What, nev-er part n-gnin ? Ko, noTer part a-gain, No, never part itgain, Xo, nev-er part again : Ob, there wo shall with Jceas dwell. And ner - er part a - gala 



^ip'p^^Sff 



^^^ ^•gs;^ j m i^^^a± ^^g^ p^ ^grJi^n 



DERRICK. C. M. D 




Hark! the glad sound, the Sa - viour comes, The Sa - viour prom-ised lone!) -\ i • ^i u ■ ■. , , 

X. ,i_i. XL AT I • y un uina tJie opi • nt large - iy 

Let ev - Tj heart pro - pare a throne, And ev - ry voice a song. J f b j 



P — S? g> 



2. He comes, the pris' - ners to re - lease, In Sa - tan's l.ond-age held;) jj^ ^^^^ from thick - est films of 
The gates of brass be - fore him burst, The 1 - ron fet - ters yield, f ' 



m^^ 



^^ 



^ 



'-^=^-^ 



i^: 



3. He comes, the bro - ken heart to bind. The bleed - ing soul to cure 
And with the trea-sures of his grace, T' en - rich the hum - ble poor. 



5= 



' > Our glad ho - san - nahs. Prince of 
, J- fa 



^ 



3 



^r- 



^ 



pour'd. Ex - erts his sa - cred fire ; Wis - dom and might, and zeal and love His ho - ly breast in - spire. 

-6j E 




-g? — sr 



P 



i 



is: 



€ 



yice, To clear the men - tal ray; And on the eyes op-press'd with night To pour ce - les - tial day. 

-E p — r- : — , a /^ I ■ T -^ 






lEE 



-fir- 



E 



-g?~ 



r r -J u-jff 



""321 



^5-^ 



peace, Thy wel come shall pro - claim. And heav'u's e - ter - nal arch • es ring With thy be - lov - ed name 



"ft" 

And lose in thy i 
ntly Blray, 



i ihe Uiili of Itic day. 




2. How damp were the Tapora that fell on his head ! 3. O garden of Olivet, dear bonour'd spot ! 

How hard was his pillow ! how humble his bed' The fame of thy woDder shall ne'er be forgot; 

The angels, astonish'd, grew sad at the sight, The theme most transporting to seraphs above, 

And foUow'd their Master with solemn delight. The triumph of sorrow, the triumph of love. 

ROSE OF SHARON. 



4. Come, saints and adore him ; come, bow at his feet! 
Oh, give him the glory, the praise that is meet; 
Let j'lyful hosannas uncensiugly rise, 
And join the full chorus that gladdens the skies. 



Sol. Song ii. 



Billinss. 



fii^sfe^MEg^P^ifel^fepES^FgfepE^ 



fia;r»=^ 



r ^ * 



g^' Fgj- ^ 



'SISl 



UE 



i^a 






I am the rose of Sliaron, and the lily of the' valley ; 



I am the rose of Sharon, and the li - ly of the valley. 




• =?^^ 



f^FFF 



-^-' ^^~^ ' 



f=^^- 



^ 



_ ~ ^ '«1 ^ ~ 



?I|C 



v^i 



-fc^-*; 



£&^F 



•y's*" 



ISHt 



ii:^ 



^^ 



ROSE OF SHARON. Conttnuen 



201 



S^g^ 



m 



W: 



i^^ 



EF^feEii^itegffl 



As the lily among the thorns, so ia my love among the daughters ; 



-^- — ^^-pr-j^-- sir- 

As the apple tree, tlie apple tree a • mong the trees of the wood. 



l^iE^^Sisi&ES 



I 



s 



'^ 



ici: 



^S^^^f^^^ 



f=^ 



EE FPiiPP fe^pEpEpIp 









zEEEl 



P 



:s^ 



•i&ztJ: 



:gSg^ 



151- 



so is my bo • loveil among the sons, so is my be - loved among the sons. 



I sat down un - der his shadow with great delight 






¥f^- 



:WJiL 



t=^ 



3 



^ 



nr^ 









^I^SS 



201/ 



KOSE OF SHARON. Continued. 



[|§=^^S^^^^ptepfe^^ 



^ 



was sweet to my taste ; And bis fruit, and bis fruit was sweet to my taste. 



le— : 



E^^^^^Sfei 



tik~ 



m 



m 



WL^ 



:iiPi 



:ffi^a=EErf 






tzs^irff^it 



Anil his fruit 



was swTCt to my taste. 



^esui^fesiis 



:6:iriz~iji~::i 
4— 



zi:^-*-^^ 



i^iS 



nnzLZ 



And bis fruit, and bis fruit W4s sweet to my taste, And his fruit, and his fruit, &c. 



H« brought me to the banqueting house. 



X=^ 



^^E^^El^^Sii:"fe"^fe 



^ 



- i- :* * ' 



JUl— H 



issj; 



B 



il: 



Kzt^ 



'nzczL 



^ 



.i_iif_|i:pz 






his banner over me was love. He brought me to the banqueting house, his banner over me was love. 



M 



!!^^^^l^^tei 



Stay me with flagons, comfort me with 



~Ml 



f-^- 






i?.r^'"»* 



^•'t^T'Es: 



m^^ 



z5rrznL3Z5z:i; 



g— pi- 






i^^:^^ 



ROSE OF SHARON Continued 



203 



^g^J 



m~ 






aj pics, For I am sick, for I am sick, for I ara 



of love : I charge you, ye ilaughtera of Jc - nisalera. 






^ 



£ 



-F 



±eb:-eheis 



^^^Ep ^_P_^F^EF^F^^^-gEgEg F^^ 



S 



:E 



z:=g:z:r 






^"pgggjSFeg 



By the roes, and by the hinds of tho field, That you stir not up, that you stir not up, that you st:r not up, that you stir not up, nor a- 



psEpip 



=ii=F 



tis 



^ 



^^fe^ 






^ 






■p^^?-^ 

£|^ 



204 



KOSE OF SHARON. Conttnuea 






m 



wake, awake. a - wake, a - wake, my love, till he please, 



The voice of my be - lovcJ, Be • hold ! he cometh. 



rEEt 






iiiH^ 



i 



' — 1^— '^ h i fj— r -y- iritr: 



E^_^^ifel:^ 



a:z=;p; 



E33EE 







leaping upon the mountains, skipping, :I: :[: leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills. 



Mt beloved epake, and 



i 



IE 



E^^p^Se^%!^^^^ 






^^P^^ssSs^Eiii^^fiS^ 



ROSE OF SHARON.. Conttmiea 



205 



■-BEfi: 



^ 



m~z 



m 






said unto me, Rise up, rise up, rise up, rise up, my love, tny fair one, and come away. 



For lo, the winter is 



ISZC. 



'^^B 



B^£ 






-tx 



- F4 -^ 



Wl^. 



^]^^^^^^ 



^MiS^^^g 



gE£=i|^ggg:£gEg^ i^gs ^^: ^^Pi as 



S: 



^ 



£ 



-P-P- P- 



iE^E=^^1S7ii?^^M 



past, tbs rain is over and gone. For lo. Sic 



\hs rain is o ver, tbe 



EFEfeT'EEtS^^E 



bEeE 



P 



.-p—^- 



IZZC 



;p=^e^ep3 



EEM 



:fe^ 



g; 



p-p-^-^p 



§:^Jc::EE: . 



g^_. 



E^=izBE^E& 



^ 



Eh 



:r:zn 



-P-P- 



ft^rESaEEE 



FS 



Etrziii: 



m 



cr-s — ^• —j* » 



3 



206 



ROSE OF SHARON. Concmded. 



-=^ 



lEEEE 



lESt 



?eE 



^ 



^=£3E^E^EEi 



?="-p: 



iS_i 



rain U over, the rain is orer and gooc. 



For lo, Ac 



^^p^ ^g^lEfe -pgi^E^-^^^-lF^^^^^^ 



:t=tt 



SES^^EES 



^i■- 



4i A A A A H V r~f ~ r4 



EeE 



^^ 



=«e: 



a 



HEAVENLY VISION. 



Taken from Rev. v. 11. 



Billinss. 






p^ 






fEgf 



nuzzEzn 



•F=r^ 



XZK 






-*-f»- 



;ee^ 






I beheld, and 



a great mullituJc, which no man could number, Thousands of thousands, and ten times thousands, thousands, &.C 



iifel===l 



iBzitit- 



l^p^^s; 



±^ 



m^^^ 



m 






^fa£E=:ia^Ei:F^ 






f~> wr— '^-^ h r-^ T 



HEAVENLY VISION. Continued 



20' 









W 



Bit: 



hF- 



g-M^gg§£^i^EP 



^H 



^— P-P--^ 



?^g£ p 



^s:ic 



thousands of thousands, tinJ ten times thousands, Thousands, &c. 



Stood before the Lamb, and they had palms in thei.' 



E^i 



-p— ©- 

nzzxz 






rfFZ 



F^jza:^-^^p^j^3^^g;^^g:fe=^l^ 






£:-P5R 






'^~9>- 



Eee 



^EfeEFfi 



IIZIS 



=^F^I 



p p - 



P^f^yJF^^^I -^^^ g^FP 



s 



FF 



ias 



izz^- 



:pi: 



ffi 






g^ 



^ 



5z: 



-f»-l»- 



5i^ 



^a=u 



sis: 



-P-pfr-f 



:p=p: 



pp 



^gi^E^ 






=Ef^ 



hands, and they cease not day nor night, sayin;. 



Holy, holy, holy, holy, holy. Lord God Al - mighty. Which was, and is, and 



:4:^=i=S=n=tr 



£: 



■m 



prci 



Pi©^ 



^^ 



.1 I : «) 



PP - B-H— P- 



E 



PPt^ 



'rzcZL 



fpF 



ijrPz^aE 



^ ^^-!^^^P=f^=R^^^^ 



-•-^-4- 



:t=t^ 



l^ 



f>p 



iBrris 



=Ep-pf^ 



^ T W- 



:ti=p: 



^ 



-.dLP 



H 



208 



HEAVENLY VISION. Continue^ 



ggg gFp 






^S^^^i^ 



B 



®ES^1^ESs£fg^ 



s^^ig^ 



£ 



'^-f*^ 



Wi 



is to come, Which was, &c. 



&hzt 



ip:^ 



And I hearj a mighty angel 



ing through the miJst of beav'n, 



p^fe^ =i i5SE^l£^:^^^g£gfe^^^^^£§^^l^^ 



-f3^r^^^P^^f?^^^£|g^";^P^ 



EEFEtfe 



-t^ 



ilil^ 



^^^I^S^^^ss 



I 3 LSZZ 



>^^ 



crying with a louJ voice, Wc 

liL 



-— P- 



m->n 



[^^te.^ 



wo, wo, 



De unto the earth by reason of the trumpet which is 



1]^^ 



■r-r^ 



y—h-^ 



_t^'.. 



-:e^E^=Ft 



lOZJI 



P^ 



p_^^ 



E?^^fe^:^J 






-^-P- 



l^^&^^Sg^ 



HEAVENLY VISION. Continued. 



209 






f: :^ci^^ zpib^" izsz Jzp- gz^^"E| 



-L-t-rr~i^^~-^- 



^FE 



:!!ziE: 



^eE ^g^EEEgg^^^aE^r^^;,^! 



yet to EOiuid. 



And when the la«t trumpet sounded, the great men and nobles, rich men and poor, bond ajiJ free, gathered themsclres to- 



:i=:s=t 



i^fe^P^ 



EE 



^^ig^^ 



(^:- 



£E 



;F=a 



p 



^§i^i^s 



32 



&?: 



-g=3=;j 



sza: 









:^z^i^z:^^^E^^aE|^^zig=^E^ 



-p-^-p- 



:2zc 



^^I^^^E^I 



KEBS 



EZTZC 



^g^F^£p^pE^|lEa 



j^g g^ ^gl^;^ 



gether, and cried to the rocks and mountains to fell up - on them, and hide them from the face of Him that siltetli on the throne. 



P P p P-p-p 






p-^-p 



g#jsiiiiii 



210 



HEAVENLY VISION. ConduOtd. 



tP-f- 



^^^^^^m^^^^'^^^^^^^w^f^^^^^^ii 



^■H^^bEEFpgg^^^zKz^ ^^zz^ 



-C P-- 



^g ^g^i^^g^g^ ^^ 



For the great day of the Lord a come, and who shaU bo able to stand 1 



And who shall be 



a - ble to Etand? 



^'^ ^^?^^ ^hr^ ^^U^^^^ : 



:izz:H^^^ 



SE^f^ 




t-a r 



Effi 



-^ 



ODE ON SCIENCE. Sharp Key on G. 

rEHT' ■ — 



-t^ 



W--Pf- 



£E 



Ip^i^^iP^ 



*-»-I= 



^a^t 



'I i*zE 



& 



r.»-K 



fclt 



ffig 



S?E 



-p— jO 



-P 



^fe 



The mom - ing sun shines fVom the cast, And spreads his glo • ries 



3r^_ 



=HF^ 



ppF|EFE^::^F 



to the west. All 
-O 



nations with his beams arc 



nzczz 



^q^Pg ' 



tt 



zr-t—c. 



iJDi<: ON SCIENCE. Contmueo. 



211 



£Cf^ ^|gEg£p 



iPlP- 



3iIEII=t 



ECZgrZ iS 



EF 



^g^^^^^ 



ZTirBlf^lh 



:pi 



^^feeh 



1 



EE 



^a^f^fe 



1 



blest, Where'er the ra - diant light appears. 



So SCI - ence 



^TT^ 



m 



PS 



& 



her lu - cid ray O'er lands which long in 



:!s:^T^ 



P-P 



s s 



ll^[ 



|g i gg =^^ ^ ^^^-r^ ^F -^-= ^ ^-gEF:^EtgEg^ ^p 



^- 



^^N^ 



^ 



iKtc 



^^^ ^Pg^P^^^^ _pEg^ 



darkness lay She vi . siU fair Co • lum - bi - a. And eets her sons a - mong the stars. 






-P-P- P- 



^^ 



^3^ 



e 



-iQ- 



P-P 



^E^bf 



g^^ 



212 



ODE ON SCIENCE Concluded 



^g^^S^^^s^g^a^^^^^^^^^^S^ 



^liSs^^E gF-g^fe^a^^^^^-gi^^^H^ ri^ 



fceedom her at . icndanl ttBiU, To bleaa the por - tali of hei gate., T.^ cntwn !he young uv! rianE al»le« With UureU of im • mortal Uay ! The 



Wz 



£EE£ 



i^^^^^^^^^^^i^^ 



P^^^i^^S 



w 



^ ^^^^?^^^^s^ ^ 



-p-p- 



w 



^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^M 



British yoke, Ihe GalUc chain, Was urged upon oar nt^ks iii vain, All haughty tyranto we disdain, And about. Long Uve A - me - ri - ca. 



^^^^Pii^Si^^S^^S^^i^^St 



UAViD'S LAMENTATION. 



Z sani. xviu. 33. /iiliuigs 



213 



i=^g|^E^^^^^P 



S 



Xd 



TP=i^ 



^^ 



IjIDIH 



3_g 



ESB 



^ 



David the king was grieved and moved. He went to his chamber, his chamber, and wept ; 



he went he wept, and said, 



:*=K 



^^^^^^^^ 



x: 



ms^is^^ 



■p-w- 



^E^S^^SE^B 



^fe^;^gi 



W 



frTF' 



?: ^\p^^^i^:^^ f^p^^i^^pj ^t^m ?- 



3^ 



^ 



O my son I 



^ 



^^s=^Si^^yai 



Would to God I had died. 



For thee, O Absalom, my son, my son ! 



E^ 



te 



Eg^^^^gi^ 



p--ti 



m 



■i=p: 



ts: 



♦ >= 



^^^E^F FS^f f^g ^ -Ep^jj-j^E^ 



214 



s^--^ 



FAREWELL ANTHEM. 



^i^Hi^^ 



3>2 



^■^-P 



^tr^^ 



^^^^ 



& 



sm 



My ftiends. 



I am going, I am going a long and 



s 



& 



m 



izcrcrzn 



-f»-f»-i 



:P=5 



My friends, I am going a long and ts • dious joor 



^^ 



£32" 



i^ 



Never to return ; I am going a long jgurncy, never to return. I am 




g ^-^fs^^^^^ 



tedious journey, Never to return. I am going a long journey. Never to re - tarn. Never to re • turn. Never to re turn. Never to re- 



p-J-l— . . . "-T— ■ ■ ' 



-^^-f»-,^ 



"r— r 



:^gg 



-l»P_f-^: 



going a long journey. Never to return. I am going a long journey. Never to re - turn. 



Never to return. 



-Pi-F- 



::-m>:p:pt=iiiiiz=: 



-P-P-Pi-!^- 



=f^-^l 



^"^^^- 



,ir{EWELL ANTHEM Coniumta 



SI 5 



\±± 



r^^^sitE^. 



Ip^^z^f^^^lig 



^^^^E^p 



Fare you well, 



£ie^gE&lE!^ ^jg^|ErE^ 



never, never, never, never, 

J*- 



Fare you well, my friends. 



:EeS^E1 



^ 



^^^ 



;szr 



EEE 



^^^m 



never to re • tora- 



never, never 



Fare you well, my friends. 



g^ 



:SaE^ 



m. 



^ 



£E^5Ete 



:^E 



:s 



fe^E^^^zfc^Ml zpriiigpEE^gg^ 



ibpi|iDi 



^ ^^f^^^^3^^:^S^^^^ESB^^^^^E^S^^^^^ 



fizc 



r are you well, my frienda. And God grant we may meet together in that world a - hove. 



-P--I 



=5= 



Where trouble shall cease and harmony shall abound. 



g 



IZZZdC 



^elp 



-r- 



:ni 



^&^i 



^^3e.^^^^^ 



:«iS=!L 



a:^ft rg=r-FJfffgEEra^i 



tVltole Jill nvln-r of Pn^ts 



{:?.','."!"•".'.:«" FAREWKLL ANTHEM. Conaudcd 



ff 



fe 






:^ 



hark ! hark ! my dear friciiils, for death hath call'd me, 



And I must go, and lie down in the cold and silent grave. Where the mourners cease from mourning, 



^ 



^^^^IS^^^f^ie^^^Sl^ii 



a^ 



-F— ^ 



I I "P 



^^K^^^ 



:aEa r=g=r~ rr "rTTf 



-^ 



teal 



Tm 




^^^^fe^^^^^^ 



sQUPL^zcE^^ 



;r^~ - ^-p- ^-i^>~ 3: 



iPit 



^aSEBE^Ep 



and the pris'ner is set free ; Where the rich and the poor are both alike ; Fare you well, fare you well, fare you well, fare you well, fere you well, my friends. 




2Ui 



APPENDIX: 



CONTAINING 



EVERAL TUNES ENTIRELY NEW. 



INTERROGATION. 7's. 



Christopher. Baptist Harmony, 14 1. 






^^^^^^^^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Yt^ 



-4 ^K 



■fs-pi- 



-f — 1 I I— 



p ^?|g|rEg|^ 



o: 



r:P 



rjzTz 



m 



'JfLji. 



W^ 



fe 



Et 



S 



Hark ! my soul, it is the Lord ; 'Tis the haviour, hear his word ; Jesus speaks, he speaks to thee— Say, poor sinner, :| : Say, poor sinner. Say, poor sinner, lov'st thou me ! 



^-2 
-4 



-F,^ 



m^EP4Fi 



■FFi 



-pp 



ii^^H^iSSEfS^ 



:t 



2.1 i) 



25C 



DUDLEY. CM. 



fVm. fValker 



^ 



^±=p=^&rzzf!=&£ ^f^^ ^P^^EgEg^ ^^Eg^^:g|g?P^f=r 



-.-^- 



\-4-' 



----r. 



P 



±1 



je: 



e^ 



Its: 



^--iiszP- 



g^ESP 



?=f^ 



When I can read my ti • tie clear to man - sions in the skies, 



I'll bid fare - well to ev • rv 



S^ 



sz^c 



^^^ 



-"F=F 



in: 



£EFEE^I^H ttf^=^F=^ ^ 



--tFzh=P: 



^=^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S 



^^ 



f=r=^: 



2:^ 



^ 



ii:P^ 



fe 



"I r 



pE p!]:^:;:p-cr£ g 



f=f 



P^=*a 



I 



fear, And wipe my weep - ing eye*. I'll bid fare - well to ev - 17 fear, I'll bid fare-well to ev • ry fear. And *ipe my wecp-ing eyes. 



fe 



^^f^Sf^^r 




2 Should carlh against my soul engage. 

And hellish darts lie hurl'd, 

Then I con smile at Satan's rage. 

And face 11 frowning world. 



3 Let cares like a wild deluge come, 
And storms of sorrow fall ; 
May I but safely reach my home 
Mv flod, my heaven, mv all. 



i There shall I bathe my weary soul 
In seas of heavenly rest, 
\nd not a wave of trouble roll 
\cro3ri my poaceful br^^jiwi. 



SWEET HOME. 11,11.11,5,11. 



feg|^fe^^Sg^i^g!l^SgEfeffe-F?l 



siffi 



I c^^ 



fiaptist Harmony, p 431 i5J 



^fPiH^aggfefj^pgg ga ^ 



.f 

'MiJ scenes of con-fu-sion and crea-mre complaints, How sweet to my soul is com-mu-nion with saints ; To find at the banquet of mer-cy there's room, And feel in the 



-p-^^- 



^^ gs|a^iEgg^^^g^£pEB|g^^^§gE B^ 




WSE^ 



]a 



:q:: 



iPi 



^ 



i^^^SE 



prc-senco of Jo-sus, at home. Home, home, sweet, sweet home ; Pre-pare me, dear Sa-viour, for glo-ry, my home. 



^ 



pip: 



niL 



i^^-K 



:^->^- 



mnn. 



i Sweet bonds, that unite all the children of peace ! 
And thrico precious Jesus, whose love cannot cease ! 
Though oft from thy presence in sadness I ro|m, 
I long to oeiiold thee in giory, at home, 
Humn, home, iic 



3 I sigh from this body of sin to be free. 

Which hinders my joy and communion with thee ; 
Though now my temptations like billows may foam, 
All, all will be peace, when I'm \rith thee at home. 
Home. home. &.c. 



4 While here in the valley of conflict I stay, 
O give me submission, and strength as my day ; 
In all my afflictions to thee I would come, 
Rejoicing in hope of my glorious home. 
Home, home, &c 

6 Whate'er thou deniest, O give me thy grace. 
The Spirit's sure witness, and smiles of thv face; 
Indulge me with patience to wait at thy tnrone. 
And find, even now, a sweet foretaste of home. 
Home, home, &c. 

6 I long, dearest Lord, in thy beauties to shine, 
No more, as an exile in sorrow to pine. 
And in thy dear image, arise from tlie tomt. 
With glorified millions to praise thee, at home. 
Home, home, sweet, sweet, home. 
Receive me, dear Saviour, m glory, my ^OID* 



■^52 



WONDROUS LOVE. J2. 9. 6, 6. 12, 9 



Chrisiopner. 



^^ 



-P-F- 



fzh 



"16— W 



^f^^^g 



s&feE 



S 



L^ 



1: 



trrfcz=i{:z:z 



-b-^F- 



S 



sczE: 



^ 



& 



lE^EEe 



J 



^^^^^==^ 



e^-^ 



^P 



=P=|t 



St^ta 



2r: 



What won-<lrou8 love is this, oh ! my soul ! oh ! my soul ! What won-drous love is this, oh ! my soul ! What won-drous love ia this ! That 



ES 






^m 



fE^ 



-^.^^E^ 



iEr^E 



=^5 



a=t 



^^-=F 



IB 



s 



:!*«.-: 



S=&: 



-F— »- 



£Ei 



f=r=^ 



^^^^Pl^ 



caused the Lord of bliss, To bear the dread-ful curse for my soul, for my soul. To bear the dread-ful curse for my soui. 



W=^^ P- 



rzrziE 



Kf^T^^^^ 



fee 



t-^ 



ig-li 



THE HEAVENLY MARCH. CM. IVm. Walker. Eaptist Harmony, p. 42S. 



i^:i 



S# g^^gge^g^gFgg^tflgg^g^ -£^££g£g 




m 



f>i^ 



f^?^- 



-CF 



^^^^&^^l 



On Jor-dan's storm-y banks I stand, And cast a wish-ful eye To Ca-naan'a fair and hap-py land, Where my possessions lie. 

To see the right-eoiis a march-ing home and the 






-^-irW\ 



:^c 



^^^^^^S 




p-^-iT-P- 



gE^EF pr^g^ g 



:!»*; 



v?i 



^w 



:^g 






;gfe-" 



:t»-^i 



:cE 



3.f=a 



P^P 



:rzc 






Ea 



-j—^'S-g' 



rifc? 



iM^^Frr 



ts; 






sg^l^^i 



an-gels bid them come, To wcl-come trav'-lers home, to wel-come trav'-Iers home. 

And Jc-sus stands a wait-ing, to wcl-come trav'-lers home. And Je-sus stanils a wait-ing, to wel-come trav'-lcrs hum 



-M»^K 



iirStr^h: 



,^,''--r 






254 



SOMETHING NEW. C. M 



K^ 



jit 









' a«"ie~y 



- — K 



izht 



pgES^^H^^I 




1 Since man by sin haa lost his God, He seeks ore - a • tion through ; And vain-ly strivas for so - liJ bliss, In try - ing some - thing new, In 









HJ^ 



U I I P" 



'■^^ 



^ — I — y 



:t: 



S^gEE£fe 



^^^ 



?"F 



"I r 



=F=^ 



fl— P- 



:?=?: 



-t-K-± 



SE 



i 



try - ing some • thing new, And rain • ly strives for so - lid bliss, In try - ing some - thing new. 




3 The new possessed like fading 6owers, 
•Smjn liisfs its giiy hue ; 
The Imlilile now no lonijiT stays. 
Til.. Kiiiil w.uils >«iinrlhin? now 



3 Now could we call all Europe ours. 
With [nclia and Peru ; 
Till! mind would feci an aching void. 
An' sljll wml wimcthir.E ii<w. 



4 But when we feel the power of Christ, 

All good in him we view ; 
The soul forsakes her vain pursuits, 
In Christ finds something new. 

5 The joy the dear IJeJccmcr gives, 

Will bear a strict review • 

Nor need we ever change agam^ 

For Christ is always new 

6 Come, sinners, then and seek tlie joys 

Which Christ bids you pursue ; 
And keep the glorious ihcme in view. 
In Christ seek something new 

7 But soon a change awaits us all. 

Before the grent review : 
.^nd at his feet with rapiurr i»ll. 
And llraven linngs siiiu<^iiiiiic iw>» 



iiSSAY 7, 6. 7, G, 7, 6, 7, 6. 






"CZe~P 



By ^. C.Clark Baptist Harmonv, 4,')S Sftn 



=P 



1 See how the wick- eJ kingdom Is fall-ing cv'- ry Jay! And still our bless -ed Je-su3 Is winning souls a - way 



ICZezsi; 



■Dr^H 



■^-E 



f^-'^^^f 






'^' U I k*i 

2 Withweeping and with praying, My Je-sus I have found. To cru-ci-fy old na-turc. And make hisgrace a-bound. 

3 If sin-iKTs will serve SaUn, And join with one ac - cord, Dear brethren, as for my jiart, I'm bound to serve the Lord; 




Dear children, don't be 
And if you will go 







|g^M 



tempted, No mortal tongue can tell ! So oft-en I'm surrounded With enemies from hell. 




wea-ry. But march on in the way; For Je-sus will stand by you, And be your guard and stay, 
with me. Pray give to raeyour hand, And we'll march on together, Unto the promised land. 



^i^i@l^§Si^ 



4 Through troubles and distresses, 
■ We'll make our way to God ; 
Though earth and hell oppose us, 

We'll keep the heavenly road. 
Our Jesus went before us. 

And many sorrows bore. 
And we who follow after. 

Can never meet with more. 

5 Thou dear to me, my brethren. 

Each one of jou I find. 
My duly now compels me 

To leave you all behind : 
But while the parting grieves us, 

I humbly ask your prayers, 
To bear mo up in trouble. 

And conquer all my fears. 

6 And now, my loving brothers, 

I bid you all farewell ! 

With you my loving sisters, 

1 cnn no Ifpiigrr d\'>'ell. 



Farewell to every mourner ! 

I hojie the Lord you'll find, 
To ease you of your burden. 

And give you peace of mind 

7 Farewell, poor careless sinners! 

I love you dearly w»^II ; 
I've labour'd much to bring yoj 

With Jesus Christ to liweii , 
I now am bound to leave you— 

O tell me, will you gol 
But if you won't decide it, 

I'll bid you all adieu I 

8 We'll bid farewell to sorrow. 

To sickness, care, and pain. 
And mount aloft with Jesus 

For evermore to reign ; 
We'll join to sing his prai.scs 

Above the ethereal blue , 
And tJieii, poor careless sinneii 

What will become iif vou i 




^ 



^ 



THE LONE PILGRIM. 11,8,11,8. 



Wm. Walker. 



^ 



=F 



f^^ 



fj ^^ H f l 



rf=Nte 



•]^^ — ^ — KT 



I I 



^i^^^^ 



1. I caae to the place where the lone pil-grim lay, And pen-sive - ly stood by the tomb, When in a low 'whis - per I 



^ pr"r^rrff?=^atj^rrr 



^ 



f=rf 



FFlrr r l -^^ -i^^ 



^^ 



^ 



t±r 






ss 



heard Bome-thing say. How sweet - ly 



sleep here a - lone ! 



i_ap j--h-^;:^ j; ^ ^^^l f f^^l ^ 




2. The tempest may howl, and the lond thunder roar, 

And gatherinj* storms may arise, 
Yet calm is my feeling, at rest is uiy soul, 
The tears are all wiped from my eyes. 

3. The cause of my Master compell'd me from homo, 

I bade my companions farewell; 
I blest my dear children, who now for mo mourn — 
In far distant regions they dwell. 

4. I wander'd an exile and stranger from homo, 

No kindred or relative nigh ; 
I met the contagion, and sank to the tomb, 
My soul flew to mansiuns on high. 

5. Oh tell my companion and chiUlren most dear, 

To weep not for mc now I'm gone ; 
Tho same hand that led mc through scenes mos^ sovore, 
lliic kindly assisted me home. 
*6. And there is n crown that doth glitter and shino, 
That I shall for evermore wear: 
Then turn to the Snviour, his love's all divine. 
An yyu that would dwell with mo there. 



' -xw 



.tth -, 



1 corai'o;<ed bj* J J. Uiclis, ut N'or'b (;-t 



FUNERAL THOUGHT. 12. U 



On tne Death of an Infant. By Ualdweli. 



257 




Thou art gone to the grave — but we will not deplore thee, Though sorrows and darknos esicompafs the tomb ; The Saviour has pass'd through its por-tals before thee. And ths 




g£ggg]gg :EE5Si 



icia: 



s 



:W- 



EC 



;^H^-^^^^s=£--g|g^ 





laiap of his love is thy guide through the gloom, And the lamp of his love is thy guide through the gloom. 




2 Thou art gone to the grave^wc no longer behold thee^ 

Nor tread the rough patlia of the world by thy side , 
But the wide arms of mercy are spread to enfold thee 
And sinners may hope, suice the Saviour hath died. 

3 Thou art gone to the grave — and tliy cradle's forsaken, 

With us thy fond spirit did not tarry long, 
But the sunshine of heaven beam'd brighten thy waldng. 
And tlie sound thou didst hear was the seraptiim's song. 

4 Thou art gone to the grave, but 'twere wrong to deplore thee 

When God was thy ransom, and guaidian, and euide. 
He gave thee, and took thee, and soon wili restore ttee. 
Where dca!h hath no sling, since the Saviour haih iied 



u 



25« 



THE SAINTS BOUND FOR liHiAVJlJW. 12,9. s,y ^: King and W. fValktr 




^i^£S§=^ 



eSFfeE^E 




^tei^ 



I Our liondage It Bhall end, by and by, by and by, Our bonJi^ it ^all end, by and by; From Egypt's yoke set free ; Hail the glorious jubi- 



-B-^- 



?^ 



e 



^ 



-p-t 



-£p 



^ 



^£ 



-p-p 



\=K^ 






:izl» 



=zhzE 



>=f^ 



-^-^- 



s 



[ Hgggg 



icEl5t*itfi?£s 



E 



^ 



^gfe^^ 



Pzszt 



ziipisztioSTe 



T^r-f- 






>-^-i^- 



E^-g 



lee. And to Canaan we'll re -turn, by and by, by and by. And to Canaan we'll return, by and by. 



-p-p 



^i felgEijtpg g gF-^ ^sii 



•i Our deliverer lin shall come, by and by. 
And our sorrows have an oncl, 
Willi our threescore j'cai9 and ten. 
And vx-it alory rrown tlji; i! »v, by and by 



3 Thouijh our enemies are strong, we'll go or 
'i'liough our liearts dissolve with fear, 
Lo, Sinai's Ciod is near, 
Wliile the t!i!i/ I'illar imuvi,-. «e'U go on. 



4 Though Marah has bitter streams, we'll go on ; 
Though Baca's vale be dry, 
And the land yield no supply; 
To a land of corn and wine, we'll go on. 

6 And when to Jordan's floods, we are come, 
Jehovah rules the tide. 
And the waters he'll divide. 
And the ransom'd host shall shout, we are come, 

6 Then friends sliall meet again, who have loved. 

Our embraces shall be^^wcct 
At the dear Redeemer's feet, 
When we meet to part no more, who have loTod. 

7 Then with all the happy throng, we'll rejoie* 

Shouting glory to uur King, 
'I'ill the vaults of heaven ruig, 
•Vnd throuah al! clLiuitv we'll reioiw 



SWEET AFFLICTION. 8,7 




KH 



Kippon's Hymns, a4i. 259 



^^^^^ftS^^^E^t^^ 



iE^^S^^EaFfE^^^ 



EZC 



H^ 



T~r 



tE 



p 



K 



^PT 



I ; the floods of tri-bu - la-tion, While the bil-Iows o'er me roll, Hal-le - 'u-jah, Kal-lc - lu-jah, Hal-Ie - lu - jah, praise the LorJ, H*I-le - lu-jah, 
Je-sus whis-pers con-so-la-tion, And sup-ports my faint - ing soul, 



^aaas 



E|aE|Eg^;giiiEEgiip E|ggEE^ 



■p 




2 Thus the lion yields me honey 
From the eater food is sjiven , 
Stiengthen'd thus, I still press forward, 
Singing as I wade to heaven : 
ftwoet affliction, sweet affliction. 
And mv sins are all forgiven. Wwcet. ^. 



3 Mid the gloom the yivid lightning. 

With increasing brightness play 
Mid the thorn bright beauteous flowret* 
Look more beautiful and gay. 

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, 

Hallelujah, praise the Lord. Hallelujah, &c^ 

4 So in darkest dispensations 

Doth my faithful Lord appear, 
With his richest consolations 

To reanimate and cheer. 

Sweet aifliction, sweet alHiction, 

Thus to bring my Saviour near. Sweet, &C. 

5 Floods of tribulations brighten, 

Billows still around mo roar; 
Those that know not Christ ye frighten. 
Cut my soul defies your power. 

Hallelujah, Hallelujah, 

Hallelujah, praise the Lord. Hallelujah, tic. 



6 In Ihe sacred page recorded ; 

Thus the word securely stands, - 
Fear not, Fm in trouble near thee. 

Nought shall pluck thee from my hands. 
Sweet affliction, sweet affliction. 
Every word my love demands. Sweet, Ac. 

7 All I meet I find assist me. 

In my path to heaverily joy ; 
Where the trials now attend mc. 
Trials never more annov. 
Hallelujah, Hallelujah, 
Hallelujah, praise the Lord. Hallelujah, &C. 

8 Wearing there a weight of glory. 

Still the path I'll near forget 
Uut exulting cry it led me 
To my blessed Saviour's fee- 
Sweet affliction, sweet affliction. 
Which has brought to Jesus' feet. 8wert.<V«. 



^0 



EBR 



STAR OF COLUMBIA. ll's. Miss M. T Durham. Words bv Dr. Dwigrii 



1 Co - lum-bia ! Co - lum-bia ! to glo - ry a-rise, The queen of the world, and the child of the Bkics, Thy gc-nius com-mands thee, with 



^^=^s^^^^^^S^^^^E^U^^^[^,^^^^^^, 



-a-B- 



3 To coii-qucst and slaugh-tcr let Eu-rope as-pirc, Whelm na - tions in blood, or «Tap ci-lics in fire ; Thy he-roe» the rights of man- 



^ 



' ^ — ''^~5 TT~r~ 



^ 



'-^^ 



J' 



' ■1 — g~6r 



\WZ 



^Si^^^ 



-13- 



k~^ 



.4 ft. 



Hp 



^^^ 






-PL 



jEgEgg^^ pgEgESEEEEg 



rap-turea be-hold, While a - gee on a - gcs thy splen^dours un-fold : Thy reign is the la^t and the no - blest of time, Mo«t 



f^^n=^ 



^- 



^F^ 



^F^E^p 



"-F- 






-*-JL_« 



^ki 



1-^^ 



cind shall de-fend. And tri-umph pur - sue them and glo-ry at - tend. 



world is thy realm, for > world be thy laws, En- 




^f^^^ 



STAR OF COLUMBIA. Umciuaea 



26 






_ssj5i » 



EgEg EgfEgjE^^^^^iijSEH^ 



s & 






« * 



sa 



fruit ful thy soil, most in - vi-ting thy clime ; Let crimes of the cast ne'er en - crim - son thy name, Ee free-dom, and sci-flnce, and vir-tuo thy fameu 



Jti 






rS^li^a-I^EEREF 



L?-^ 



-Wm 



^Se^SS 



larged aa thy cm-pire, and just as thy cause ; On free-dom's broad ba - sis that em-pire shall rise, Ex - tend with the main, and dis-sol\-e with the skies. 
"-^-^ '-^ 



EEEkE 



1 I ri v^ - 



s=p 



:^i>m 



3 Fair science her gate to thy sons shall unbar, 

And the east see thy mom hide the beams of her star i 

New bards and new sages anrivall'd shall soar 

To fame unextinguisli'd, when time is no more. 

To the last refuge of virtue design'd, 

Sball fly from all nations, the best of mankind , 

There, grateful to Heaven, with transport shall bring 

Their incense, more fragrant than odours of spring. 

4 Nor less shall tr\y fair ones to glory ascenJ, 
And genius and beauty in harmony blend ; 
Their graces of form sliall awake pure desire, 
And the charms of the soul still enliven the fire : 
Their sweetness unminglcd, then manners refined, 
And virtue's bright image enstamp'd on the mind ; 
With peace and sweet rapture shall teacb life to glow 
And light up a «miie in the aspect of wo 



5 Thy fleets to all regions thy power shall display 
The nations admire, and the ocean obey ; 
Each shore to thy glory its tribute unfold, 

^nd the cast and the south yield their spices and gold , 
\s the day-spring unbounded thy splendours shall flow. 
And earth's little kingdoms before thee shall bow, 
While the ensigns of union in triumph unfurFd, 
Hush anarchy's sway, and give peace to the world. 

6 Thus do^vn a lone valley with cedars o'erspread. 
From the noise of the town I pensively stray'd, 
The bloom from the face of fair heaven retired, 
The wind ceas'd to murmur, the thunders expired 
Perfumes, as of Eden, flow'd sweetly along. 
And a voice, as of angels, cnchantingly sung, 
Columbia ! Columbia ! to glory arise. 

The queen of the world, and the child of the skit*. 



262 



e - 



'^?EE 



i'LENARY. CM. 



Hy ^. Clark 



-Jt-Bn?. 



i^^^^^Spifelfip^ 



c^ 



■tt^ 






^^ 



^^^=F^ig^=^i^^^l 



b 



Hark ! from the tombs a doleful sound, Mine ears, attend the cry ; Ye liTJug men, come view the ground Where you mustehortly lie, Where you must shortly 



gj ^^Efemgg^^^g^^ a^feEp 



£ 



3snr 



i"!i!s. 



s^ 




Ue. --I: Ye Uving men, come view tHo ground Where you must shortly lie. 

Where you must shortly lie, 



^B=££pg&£ 



££ 



i»-fT- 



tqi-pJ 



rcsi 



2. " Princes, this clay must be your bed, 

III spite of all your towers ; 
The tall, the wise, the reverend head 
Must lie as low as ours " 

3. Great God, is this our certain doom t 

And are we still secure ? 
Still walking downward to the tomb. 
And yet prepare no more ! 

4. Grant us the power of quickening grace. 

To fit our souls to fly; 
Then, when we droji this dying flesh. 
We'll rise above the skv 



OH! TURN, SINNER. L. M. 



2fi3 




^S!^P 



1. To • day, if you will hear his voice. Now is the time to make your choice ; ? 
day, will you to Mount Zi - on go ? Say, will you have tliis Christ, or no f 5 



Oh ! turn, sinner, turn, may the Lord help you turn — 




^ 



o - :_p - 



m—m- 



-k— w 



F= PP=t=te ^ 



4=k 



121^ 



S 



i 



■f» — a- 



S^ 



S 



Oh ! turn, sin 



ncr, turn, why will you die f 
1 



i^^^-^is 



2. S«y, will you be for ever blest, 
And with this glorious Jesus rest f 
Will you be saved from guilt and painf 
Will you with Christ for ever reign i 

Oh ! turn, sinner, &c. 

3. Make now your choice, and hall no more ; 
He now is wailing for the poor: 

Say now, poor souls, what will you dpi 
Say, will you have this Christ, or no) 
Oh ! turn, sinner, &c. 

4. Ye dear young men, for ruin bound, 
Amidst the Gospel's joyful sound. 
Come, go with us, and seek to prove 
The joys of Christ's redeeming love. 

Oh! turn, sinner, &.C. 

5. Your sports, and all your glittering toys, 
Compared with our celestial joys. 

Like momentary dreams appear: — 
Come, go with us — your souls are dear. 
Oh ! turn, ainncr &c. 



6. Young women, now we look to you, 
Are you resolved to perish too J 

To rush in carnal pleasures on. 

And sink in flaming ruin downt 

Oh ! turn, sinner, &.c. 

7. Then, dear younc friends, a long farewcW, 
We 're bound to neav'n, but you to hell. 
Still God-may hear us, while we pray, 
And change you ere that burning day. 

Oh ! turn, sinner, &c. 

8. Onoo more I ask you. in his name ; 
(I know iiis love ren.ains the same) 
Say, will you to Mount Zion go ? 
Say, will yuu have this Christ, or no? 

Oh ! turn, sinner, &c. 

9. Come, you that love th' incarnate Go<l, 
And feel redemption in nis blood. 

Let 's watch and pray, and onwiud autrm. 
Till we shall meet in realms above. 
Oh ! turn sinner, itc 



2fi4 



THE SINGING CHRISTIAN. 7.6 



EJE^g^EJ^^^^ ^jihS^HS E^^Pg^pg^l^Ff^ 



1. Sometimes a light sur - prises The Christian while ho sings It is the Lord who rises With healing in his wings : When comforts are de 




2. In ho - ly contera - plation, We sweetly then pur - sue The theme of God's sal - vation, And find it ever new : Set free from present 



P5^ 



±d 



G^ 



k---^- 



S 



■g-H-g g— y 



-^s— ^-^ 






^=EF^ 



?=E 



fe^ 



ana'^^ipij: 



p-fli-? 



g^Ht 



clining, lie grants the soul a - gain A season of clear shinmg, To cheer it af • ter rain. 



^^ ^^ ^^^'^^pr^ j^ 



sorrow, Wc cheerful • ly can say, Let the unknown to-morrow Bring with it what it may. 



PS^^^S^Pi^S^^ 



m 



3. It can oring with it nothing 

But he will bear us through; 
Who gives the hhes clothing 

Will clothe his people too : 
Beneath the spreading heavens, 

No creature but is fed , 
And he who feeds the ravens 

Will give his children bread. 

. Though vine nor fi";-trec neither 

Its wonted fruit should bear , 
Though all the fields should withei. 

Nor tlocks nor herds be there , 
Yet God, the same abiding, 

His praise shall tune my TO'ce . 
For while in hmi confidir.j 

I -H'lMoi b'lt tejoic* 



FRENCH BROAD. L. M. 




ES 



? 



-H— (B- 



F=p: 



Wm. Walker. 



2H5 



s 



^p 



1. 'Hifh o'er the hills the mountaina rise, Their summits tow - er toward the skies; But far a - bove them I must dwell. 



-^ — ^^ 



PPP3EF 









2 Oh, God! for • bid that I should fall And lose my cv - er • last - ing all; But may I rise on wings of love. 



EgEgg|^^^E^=^ frr-p E|^E ^^^ 



PZTI 



Eef 




3. Although I walk the mountains high, 
Ere long my body low must lie. 

And in some lonesome place must rot, 
And by the living be forgot. 

4. There it must lie till that great day. 
When Gabriel's awful trump shall say, 
Arise, the judgment day is come. 
When all must hear their final doom. 

5. If not prepared, then I must go 
Down 10 eternal pain and wo, 
With devils tuere I must remain, 
And never more return again. 



6. But if prepared, oh, blessed thought! 
I'll rise above the moiiniaiii'.s top, 
And there remain fur evermore 

On Canaan's peaceful, happy shore. 

7. Oh ! when I think of iliat ble.-jt world. 
Where all God's people dwell in love, 
I oft-times long with them to be 

And dwell in heaven eternally. 

8. Then will I sing God's praises there, 
Who brought me llirougn my troubles here 
I'll sing, and be forever blest, 

Find sweet <vnd everla^iing rest. 



iiMswl by the A -Tuoa, lu ine fan of 1831, while iravclline over ine mountams, un Prcacli Broad Eiver, in Norib Carolina and Tenuesiee. 



2G6 



HEBREW CHILDKEN » 7,6,8,8,3.6 



Damd Walker 



r^S* 



jbl 



^ 



eESi 



x: 



l=f- 



xzLzt 



^ 



1. Where are the Hebrew children ? Where are the Hebrew children t Where are th*Hebrew children f Safe in the promised land : Tho' the furnace flamed aiound them, 




~f :ili4iJJ^\i J i^ ^ 



-p^ 



^ n^ jJ]AifL^ \:?=ij [^ 



2. Where are the twelve aposilcs ? Where are the twelve apostles ? Where are the twelve apostles f Safe in the promised land : They went thro' the flaming fire. 



^ 



t^-^- 



3e 



' r^r [_j__^ Li_K I — r^^" i I j i i '^ I M— H-i— I- 



f^ 



-»-»- 



'I — r 



3. Where are the holy martyrs 1 Where afe the holy martyrs ? Where are the holy martyrs ? Safe in the promised land : Those who wash'd their robes, and made them 



God while in their trouble found them ; He with love and mercy bound them, Safe in the promised land. 



P=a^Eja^^^g^ ^^^^^Egg^ 



Tnisling in the great IMcssiah, Holy grace did raise them higher, Safe in the promised land. 



(^ 



■^ I f"' t r 



±^- 



I 



White and Spotless pure, and laid ihcm Where no earthly slain could fade them. Safe in the promised land. 

* nil tune wu wt to music bv Datid Wauu. in l&ll : alto tbc last two vcrBes of 



i. Where are the holy Christians? :f. 
Safe in the promised land: 
There our souls will join the chorus, 
Saints and angels sing before us, 
While all heaven is beaming o'er us, 
Safe in the promised land. 

5. By and by we'll go ami meet them, :(: 
Safe in the promised land : 

There we'll eing and shout together, 
There we'll fing and shout hosanna. 
There we'll sing and shout forever, 
Safe in the promised laad. 

6. Gloiy to God Almighty, :(: 
Who called us unto him. 

Who are blind by sinful nature. 
Who have sinned against our MABcr, 
Who did send his son to save ut. 
Safe in the promised land. 

7. Where is our blessed Saviour 7 :|j: 
Safe in the promised land: 

He was scourged and crucified 
He by Romans was derided. 
Thus (he I.ord of glory dieU. 
To raise our eouis abcTt. 



tha foni arr hii compoMtioo 



BALLERMA. C. M. 



267 




'g'~»' 



"^^ZCfT 



~r 



F^^p^gs^ ag=^ fffi=p 



1. If God is mine, then present things, And things to come, are mine ; Yea, Christ, his word, and Spir - it too. And glo - ry all di - vine, 



^ 



'f^. 



fizjt 



n 



*:* 



EBTEEHfe 



E^ 



f ^ — I 1 ^^- — a~ ~ ' ' ' '"^~ w 

2. If he is mine, then from his love, He eve - ry trou • ble sends ; All things are working for my good, And bliss his rod at - tends. 

' " ' ' ' ,ti U t^ 



5-*: 



^ffete^: 



S 



^ 



afe 



f-- 



3. If be is mine, I need not fear 
The rage of earth and hell ; 
He will support my feeble frame. 
Their utmost force repel. 



4. If he is mine, let friends forsake, — 
Let wealth and honours flee — 
Sure he, who giveth me himtelf, 
Is more than these to me. 



5. If he is mine, I'll boldly pass 

Through death's tremendous vale i 
He is a solid comfort, when 
All other comforts fail. 



6. Oh, tell me. Lord! that thou art mine; 
What can I wish beside t 
My soul shall at the /ounlam Uve, 
When all the ttream* are dried. 



SHEPHERD. S. M. 




^E^E(^^|^=^z^^ 



S 



■ f^ 



? 



£!S3! 



thei 



m 



Let par - ty names no 
Among the saints on 



more The Christian world o'erspread ; Gen - tile and Jew, and bond and free. Are one in Christ their Head, 
earth, Let mutual love be found ; Heirs of the same in - he - ritance. With mutual blessings crown'd. 



p^ [=1g = ^l^ ^^gE^^ fe:^ ^^^pi 



Let en - vy, child of hell ! Be banisli'd far 
Thus will the church ba - low Re • scmble that 
k-i-& — = — = — |t-r-^^ 



way : Those should in strictest friendship dwell Who the same Lord obey, 
bove ; Where streams of pleasure ever flow, And every heart ia love. 



m 



3Et£=i 



^^ 



IS. 



:t=m: 



^ 




i'ARDONlNG LOVE. C \'. 



i^ mww^ r 



=fF^ 



t± 



Wm. Walker. 



i — r- 



li 



■&-i-- 



1. In e - vk long I took de - light, Unnw'd by shame or fear, 
Till a new object struck my eight. And stopp'J my wild career. 



I Baw one banging on a tree In • • go • nie3 and blood, 




2. Sure never to my latest brealli Can I for - get that look;? 
It seem'd to charge me with his death, Though not a word he spoke, i 



g ^ ss g^ g5^'^ 3 ;j^g p^ 



My conscience felt and own'd the guilt, And plunged me in despair ; 



^pN^^ 



iti: 



^^^ti^^s^^m . 



Who fix'd bis Ian - guid eyes on me. As near bis cross I stood. 



sS^PES 



m:z^zig. 



^ 



■kit 



F^ 



I 



I saw my sins his blood bad spilt, And hclp'd to nail him there. 



@^ 



:^ 



FT=;,FF^ 



s 



tt 



^^^^ 



o. Alas ! I knew not what I did ; 

But now my tears are vain : 
Where shall my trembling soul be hid T 

For I the Lord have slam. 
A second look he gave, which said, 

" I freely all forgive ; 
This blood is for thy ransom paid, 

I'll die that thou may'st live." 

4. Thus, while his death my sin displays 

In all its blackest hue ; 
(Such is the mystery of grace,) 

It seals my pardon too. 
With pleasing grief and moumtul )oy 

My spirit now is fill'd, 
That I should such a lite destroy, 

Yet Uve by him I kUl'd. 



Thh INDIAN'S PETITION. 12.12.12,12.]! 



26y 



3pP? 



■p--»-» 



^P-F^ 



Ig^^ggEfe ^-p ^^ ff^WFp ig 



r 

1. 'Let me go to my home in the far distant west, To the scenes of my childhood, in innocence blest, Where the tall cedars wave, and the bright waters 







2. Let me go to the spot where the cataracts play, Where I often have sported in boyhood's bright day. And there greet my fond rrwther whose heart will o'er- 



^Ui^-^^ 



TH — r 



f^^^^^ f£ ^^^=fT ^f^j 



^^^^^^m^ 



flow, Where my fathers repose, let me go, let me go. 



-^-k 



:tE 



■^^ 



H 



br^ 



Where my fathers repose, oh! there let me go. 




3. Let ma go lo my ilro, bj vfhme baltWtmrM al 'i 
I have iported bo ofl in tlie noon tt isv pride, 
And eiulted (o cootiuer the inw>leDl foe; 
To By father, the chief, let tua ^o, Jet me go. 
To Uij fKlber, the chief, oh ! there let uie go. 



lik« the fiwa leapi, anil is pure u Iti* 



flow At the sieht of her child, let me no, let me go. 



P-b-f=F+fP-f^| 



-^ 



^=^^" 



3B 



At the sight of her child, oh ! there let me go, 



6. And, ohl do let ma go t 



J P— P I 1— g r C- 1- - '^"ll' 111' e^ve of Ibe elcn lei my >.to I.e lo, 

J ^ [- '; br-l - To „,j ho»,o in ll,e >vooj lei me 50, lei me p. 

1 ! . 1 — . — L J 1 ! lcJa_ To my home in Ihe wood, ob ! there lei me p» 



TIlis ionf. 11 18 Mirf. was cnniixiscd by the son of a chief of one of Hi« wenlern tril»s, who was sen; to llic Lity of Wasliington to make a treaty with llic United Slates, whicb trc«v wa. 
ifiiCred for a while t>\ soini; unavoidable ciirumsiancfA. 



27(1 




ZION'S LIGHT. 7.6. 

I I. 



-ggf-"fg ^g;^ g ^f^r^^^^ 



EzF, 



1. The glorious light of Zion la spreading all around, And sinners now are heark'ning Unto the gospel sound : To sec the saints in glo - ry, And the anjel: 



-^^^^mm m 



2. The standard of King Jesus Tnumphant doth arise, And mourners crowd around it. With titter groans and cries. To see the saints in glory, etc. 
-P-I»n<#-(»| k K 1 L-k-T TT^n r^-n.- c-F— (•- 





P-P-fg 



izz 



3-=^: 



:sz^ 



stand inviting. The angels stand in - viting, to welcome pilgrims home. 



fe^ jg j^gi^ 



a-*T» 



-Fif: 



^Sl^S^S 



5. And of that favour'J number, 

I hope thai I am one; 
And Christ, I trust, will finish 
The work he has begun ; 
To see the saints in glory, icC 

6. He'll perfficl it in righteousness. 

And I shall ever be 
A monument of mercy, 
To all eternity. 
To see the sainta in glory, ^. 

7. I am but a young convert, 

Who lately did enlist 
A soldier under Jesus, 
My Prophet, King, and Priest ; 
To sec the saints in glory, &c. 

8. I have received my bounty. 

Likewise my martial dress, 
A ring of love and favour, 
A robe of righteousness. 
To see the saints in glory, tc. 



3. Tlie siifferms. bN-cding Saviour, 

Who dicMl on Calvary. 

U now prnrlaim'd to sinners 

To net ihif c'olty free ; 

To KC Ihu NainlB ui glory, kx. 



4. And while the glorious message 
Was circulating round. 
Some soiilin, exposed to ruin. 
Rcdeeiiiinir love have found. 
Tn we ibu saiiiis in nlory. &x. 



t the ^ 



atcr 



r Lord and Master 
J here below ; 
saints in glory. tLC. 



10. We lay onr sinful bod!cB 

Beneath the yiflding wave, 
An emblem of the Saviour. 
When he lay in the grave. 
To see the saints in glory, &e. 

11. Poor sinners, think what Jesus 

Has done for ynu and me : 
Behold his mangled body 
Hung tortured on the tree I 
To sec the saints in glory. &.c. 

13. His hands, his feet, his bleeding siM 
To you he doth display ; — 
Oh 1 tell me, brother sinn'-r. 
How can you stay away ? 
To see the saints in glory, ice 

13 Come, all you elder brethren 
Ye soldiers of the cross : 
Who, for the sake of Jesus. 
Have counted all things lose.— 
To see the saints in glitry. &« 



11. Oome » ray forua. young conv 
That we may trnvel on. 
And meet yen all in gh.rv. 
Where our Kedi-"nerf gonv 
To see the (i«iuts in f lory 



.■nr 



GOSPEL TRUMPET, (or WOODSTOCKV C M. 



: — -^-wB 




=^=^d^Ps 






:^ 



'— B 






:p-=i=r=r_z 



271 



iff 



1- Let cv* * ry mor - tal ear altend. And cV - ry heart re - joice. The trum -pet of the goa - pel sounds Wilh an in • vi - ting 

2. Ho, all ye Iiun - gry starv • in|g eouls, That feed up - on the wind, And vain - ly strive with earth • ty toys To fill an emp - ty mind; 

3. E - tcr - iial wis - doiu has prepared A aoul - re • vi • ving ftast, And bida your longing ap - pe - tites The rich pro - vi • sion taste. 



g^-t ^ |EgpBE|:Pgg M5^ P^f pa=g pip^ 



4. Hfc yo that pant for liv - ing atrcanis, Ami pine ^a - way and die. Here you may quench your ra-ging thi/st Willi springs that ne - ver dry. 

5. Riv ■ cr» of love and mer • cy here In a rich o - ccan Join; Sal - va • lion in a . bundance flows, Like floods of inilk and wine. 

6. Ye per - ish - ing and na • ked poor. Who work with migh - ly pain To weave a gar - menl of your own That will not hide your tin ; 



L._?_k_L. 



o—»—ts 






g 



p^ 



^E^&ZI 



f^- 



7. Come, naked, and a - dorm your sou la In robes pre ■ pared by God, Wrought by the la • boura at his Son, And dyed in hi> own blooj. 

8. Dear God, the treasures of thy love Arc e - rer - last - ing mines, Deep as our help - less mis'riea are. And boundless as our sins. 
8. The hap - py gates of gas - pel grace Stand o - pen night and day. Lord, we are come to seek aup - plies. And drive our wants a - way. 

NASHVILLE. L. M. 6 lines. 



\^zi 



)=1^ 



^m^ ^^s^^ s ^^^mm^^M^ 



\. I love the volume of thy word ; 



Urn 



What light and joy these leaves afford, 



To souls benighted and distrest. 



Thy precepts guide my doubtful way, 



Thy fear forbids my feet to stray, 



Thy promise leads my heart to r^-st. 



^sga^^ilpi^^^Sg^^^p 



2. Thy Ibreat'niiigs wake my slumb'rin? eyes. But 'tis thy blessed gospel, Lord, Converts my soul, subdu 

And warn me where my danger lies; That makes my guilty conscience clean, And give a free and large reward. 



^as 



^feiiiffi^^^fegpSP^^^ii^ff 



272 



HOPE. S. M. 




EtPEa^i±£:fe5£EiiEaS? 



IZE 



-ga-p- ^ 



S 



S 



i 



1. My God, my life, my love, To thee, to thee I call, I cannot live if thou remove. For thou art all in all: 



I cannot live if 




^^^ ^k^^^^^^^^r^^m^^^ ^^^^ 



2. Thy shining grace can cheer This dungeon where I dwell ; 'Tis paradise when tnou art here, If thou depart, 'tis hell : 'Tis pa - ra - diso when 



S^^EF 



e^^£W 



£ 



^ 



r-rmfV7^ 



£ 






^■ 



gg^SE^H f 



z zigi^r"r~r r i r 



For thou art 



is: 




3. The srailings of thy face. 

How amiable they are ! 
'Tis heaven to rest in thine embrace, 
And no where else but there. 

4. To thee, and thee alone, 

The angels owe their bliss; 
They sit around thy gracious throne. 
And dwell where Jesus is. 

5. Not all the harps above 

Can make a heavenly place. 
If God his residence remove. 
Or but conceal his face. 



6. Nor earth, nor all the sky 

Can one delight afford. 
No, not a drop of real joy, 
Without thv presence. Lord. 

7. Theu art the sea of love. 

Where all my pleasures roll, 
The circle where my passions move. 
And centre of my soul. 

8. To thee my spirits fly 

With infinilc desire. 
And yet how far from llioe I lie ' 
Dear Jcsns r.ii'<e me liclior. 



GOSPEL TIDINGS. S. M. 



273 



§^§§^Sg 




^^^^i^^ 






Tt: 



£^ 



^ 



1 . How beauteous are their feet Who stand on Zion's hill ! AVho bring salvation on their tongues, And words of peace reveal ! How charm - ing 



>■ 1 i*» 







is their voice ! How sweet tne tidings are ! ' Zi ■ on, behold tnv Saviour King, He reigns ana tnumphs here.' 



=^= 



•jg-pi-g-g- 



-k-^- 



-^-jg-jg-jir 



iJlS: 



s^ 



How happy arc our ears 

That hear this joyful sound 
Which kings and prophets waited for, 

And sought, but never found ! 
How blessed are our eyes 

That see this heavenly light 
Prophets and kings desired it long. 

But died without the sight. 

The watchmen join their voice. 

And tuneful notes employ ; 
Jerusalem breaks forth in songs 

And deserts learn the joy. 
The Lord makes bare his arm 

Through all the earth abroad 
Let every nation now benoii* 

Their Saviour and their Crod. 



lb 



271 



STANTON. 6 lines. 7's. 




1. Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, One in three, and three in one, " As by the ce - les - tial host. Let thy will on earth be done ; Praise by 



:t3^S 



S3 



rm 



ss 



33i 



•| — r 



"F=FF 



if^ 



^ 



2. Vilest of the sinfUl race, Loll an - swer to thy call: Mean - est vessel of thy grace, Grace di - vinely free for all; Lo ! I 

-R 



FT,/! * -I — I— -\^^^ 



nz: 



Wi^ 



>=F 



•g?" 



^ 



T~r~ 
nuz: 



^^=S 



T-g 



^ 



S 



i 



P^ 



all to ihce be given. Gracious Lord of earth and heaven ! 



s 



^ 



^B 



come to do thy will, All thy counsel to ful - fil. 



fl±f 



ta" 



^^ 



3. If so poor a worm as I 

May to thy great glory live, 
All my actions sanctify, 

All my words and thoughts receive ; 
Claim me for thy service, claim 
All I have, and all 1 am. 

4. Take my soul and body's powers, 

Take my memory, mind, and will : 
All my goods, and all my hours, 

All I know, and all I feel; 
All I think, or speak, or do ; 
Take my heart, but make it new ! 



5. Now, my God, thine own I am. 

Now I give thee back thine own : 
Freedom, friends, and heal>, and fame 

Consecrate to tb'ie alone : 
Thine I live, thrice happy I ! 
Happier still if thine I die. 

6. Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, 

One in three, and three in one 

As by the celestial host. 

Let thv will on earth be done . 
Praise Dy all to thee be given, 
Glonous Lord of earth and h«»TaB 



ROCK OF AGES. 6 anes. 7 * 



276 



^^^ g^g ^pp^ pgggp^^ggpJE lJa^^ 



1. Rock of A • ges, shel - ter me ! Let me hiJo myself in thee ! Let the wa - ter and the blood, From iliy wounded side which 



*i^?§^a^ 



-k-=- 



~^L 



Et5! 



i£ 



'6> y 



Wjzwr 



EE6EF3^£z|±£ 



^5E^E 



2. Not llic la - bor of my hands Can ful - fil thy law's demands: Could my zeal no respite know, Could my tears for ev - er 







ri:=f 



1 I i^_J I M ^— L 1 IJ- 



flow'd, Be of sin the double cure ; Cleanse me from its guilt and power. 




Si^iii^i 



flow .111 tor Bin could not a - tone : Thou must save, and thou a - lone. 



Bp J-.^ 



^r 



S 



, N . , ^ 



:lt: 



a— ^- 

f — L*- 



f-«Lz^ 



if*" U — 9' 



PIS 



3. Nothing in my hand I bring, 
Simply to thy cross I cling ; 
Naked, come to thcc for dress; 
Helpless, look to thee for graco: 
Black, I to the fountain fiy, 
Wash me, Saviour, or I die. 

^, While I draw this fleeting breath, 
When my eye-strings break in death 
When I soar to worlds unknown. 
See thee on thy judgment throne. 
Rock of Ages, snettcr uic: 
let Eie bide nivaetf in 'he« ' 



i76 



DL^NLAP'S CREEK. C. M. 



r. LeTVis 



i)-_tTi5=i^z:?±rz.rziil:rzE=xirr:=r=Tr± 



teEg^-EJE ^H 



1 My Cod, my pnr - tii 
a What cMip - ly tilings a 



and my love, My ev 
all llie skies. And tliia 



last - ing all, I've none hut thee in heaven a - bove, Or on this c.inh - ly tall, 
lur cl>jdl There's nolluiig here de - serves Tiiy_joy3, There's nothing liKe niv G.kI. 



nizzn 



3. In vain the bright, the 

4. And whilst up - on nij 



-P^- 



ent^^TC 



^r^g=P=P 



tJz!t#-4:=^-&:i= 



. -___ 



burning sun Scatlcrfl his - fee - ble light; Tis tliy sweel bea 
restless bed. Amongst thi? shaiies I mil, If my Re - ileem 



- ate my noon ; If thou wilhdrav 
shows his Iwad, *Tis morning wit 




EFFFE 



5. To thee I owe mv vcalth. ami fnendi, 6. How vain ii toy isglilfring wealth. 

And health, and ra'e abndi'; If once compared to thee; 

~" ' -■ _ -^ _ _ .. rt....v-_... — „„*■„... — niy health. 



Thanks to thy name for __, 
But tbev are not my God. 



Or what 'o my safely, 
Or aU my friends to i 



7. Were I posscaaor of the earth, 
And cali'd the stars my own. 
Without thy traces and thyself 
I were a wretch undone. 



i^pp 



8. Let others slretcli their anus like sei 
And Ef'^sp m alt the shore. 
Grant nie the visits of tliy face. 
And I desire no more. 



Bs^ 



b:^ 



•-"gr -grg? ~ 



CHINA. C. M 



Sjvan. 



'vrr 



rj^-F^ 



: ! I i I 



\njf 



-?7^ 



gS 



^Esa 



"^ 



1 



i-^rr 



1. Why do we mourn de - part - ing friends ? Or Fhake at death's 

2. Are we not tending up - ward too As fast as lime 



t^^l 



Pizi^ 



'.^35. 



-fer-b- 



-B-B- 



'32. 






ce that Je ■ 
ih the hours i 



i&r:3 



3. Why should we trenib e to con - vev Their bo . dies to the tnmb ? There the dear flesh of Je - su 
4 Tlw graves of all bia aainli be Wess'd, And sof ■ tcn'd ev' • ry bed ; Where should the dy - ing members 



ends To call them 
low. To keep us 

-a 



lay. And left a long p«r • fume. 
rest, But wuh Uieir dy - ing Head? 



^-S— T--- 



hS r- 



. Tnence he a • rose, as - cend - ed high. And show'd 
. i'hei* le: (he !3a; loud (rumoet Enund. And bti* 



iirrdippiiis'zzjztzr tt 5?_L «? — ^-^L-.—C^.r — _^rsm^_ xzl r_ 



VViLLOUGHBY. 8,8,6. 



-re^=F 



-F=P=FFi 



> — f te — k- 



ip: 



:F^F 



l^&: 






crcd wurd. What li^lit and joy those leaves af • ford, To sotiIs 



aeep dia • tn 



__t-e--- 



r^n 



ifisiy 



-f=:t 






n I r 

Thy ihrcat'nings wake our slumb'ritig eyes. And warn 



^l^|^^^^:^=^^.M 



j^^ 



p- f*^ t >. . fc w -k- 



# a J' 



dan ■ ger hcs, Bill 'tis thy gua - pel, lord, 

-6k Ik k 



i^Eli^ 



[i?fe= 



*Si- ( 1 IB,^ 



a » -7S r 



'-^. 



I 



Thy pre - ccpts guide our doubt • ful way, Thy fear for • bida our feet to stray. Thy pro • mise leads to rest. 



rfr* 



I ay ifc^ 

I — r~Hr 
:?«bJ._I I 



"«*aar ' r— r 



=P=Ff 



F — ^=[-^ ^= ^ — sb^—H 



That makea the guil - ty con - science clean. Con - veris Ihp soul and col quors siji. And gives 



p^^^^^ 



-gr— Q »- 

tE:r£E5F= 



-k — k- 



— rr~ ~~'ri 



Ss k- 



i ^~ r~> ^" 



:ff 



doldrovd 



27» WELLS L. M. .iu,u,uu.* 

«7 '^^ ^ I . ... : t.-; c..,^ i.i.., «.;ti.. ,.iiftorr,ii hn.Tri anil vfiirp. \Vi ih all voiir loticues lii3 glory 6i:tg. 



1. Vc nations of the earlli. re • j' 

2. The Lord is GckI ; 'tis he a • li 

±Zf2Z 



Be • fore the Lord, your sovToign King; Serve him with- cheerful heart and 
Doth life, and breath, and being give; We are his work, and notour 



With all your tongues his glory 

The sheep that on his pastures live. 



i~ ?|i '1 \ ~i 

' -( L I WT 



TZE 



— i 1 1 1 — ""I 1 I ^ 



T~i — n 



tzs: 



'^za. 



-^- 



3 Enter his gates with songs of joy, With praises to his courts re - pair. And make it your di - vine em . ploy To pay your thanks and ho: 

4:ThrLrrisgood,theLordis kind; Creat i. his grace, his mercy sure ; And the whole raceo^man shall «nd His truth fr om age t owage 



— 5^ 



^^^S^g^^^^S^ 



jurzL 



UL 



i 



i 



!^S^ 



E- 



ISI 






=^fess 



ZION. 8,7,4. 



^^^g^^^lPpi 



Thos. Hastings. 



-»* 



1. On the mnuntain-s top appearing, Lol the sacred herald stands, j Mourning captive, God himself shall loose thy bands. 
Welcome news to Zion bearing, Zi ■ on long in hostile lands, I 



-| ^-^ 

Mourning captive. Cod himself shall loose thy bandfc 






p-^- 



vs to Zion bearing, Zi ■ on long in hostile lands, ) muu....,.;, ^,.k..--. 



2. Lo! thy sun is ris'n in glory, God lijnisclf appears thy friend, I Creal deliv'rance Zion's king vouchsafe 
All thy foes shall flee before thee. Here thy boasted triumphs end; i 

1 2 



end: Groat deliv'ranr*, &c. 




^^^^i\ 



'i. En - e . mies no more shall trouble. All thy "roriirs shall be reilre.«-d, j ^|| ^ coDtticla end in an eUrnal rest All thy conflict. *c. 
For thy shomn thou shall have double. In thv Maker's favor blest : 1 ' 



KOCHESTER. C. M. 



279 



^^^^^ 



t— h 



K 



3=^ 



ppg^gg jEg:^ ^! 



1. There is a land of pure de - light. Where saints i 



In - finite day 



e^^ 



E^ 



^/^&i. 



-^ 



PSEB 



lutlcs the night, And pleasures ban - ish pain. 



izEF 



^"FEi 



^: 



a. Tliere ev-er-Iasl - ing spring a • bides, And ne - ver with'ring flowers; 



Death, like a nar - row sea, di • videa This heavenly land from 




3. Sweet fields, beyond the swelling flood. 4. But timorous mortals start and shrink 5. OhI could we make oar doubts remove. 6. Could we but climb where Moaea stood, 
Stand dress'd in living creen : To crosa ihia narrow aea, Those gloomy doubu that riee. And view the landscape o'er; 

t^i to the JewK old Canaan litood. And nngcr, shivering, on the brink. And see the Canaan that we love, 

While Jordan roll'd between. And fear to launch away. With uobeclouded eyes. 



STONINGTON. S. M. 




1. Ye tiemWing captives hear I The gos - pel trum - pet sounds, No mu ■ sic more can cliarm the ear. Or heal thy heart - felt wounds. 



P ^ - 



I 



F=^3:"5 



— p-Fs ?— srp^ 



^ ° <g- 



2. 'Tia not the trump of war. Nor Si 



aw - ful roar, Sal 



■ tion's newfl it spreads a - far, And vengeance 



no more. 



^E^^^^^^^^ 



T—r 



=fl-^ 



^-g?: 



-fe-=- 



280 



SILVER STREET. S. M. 



/. Str.e^t 



[src: 



^"F 



1 r 



t5^ 



^K^^l^S 



1. Couie, Eound hii na 



■ broad, And hymns of glo - ry 



Je ■ ho - vah 



;f 



the sov* - . reign God, Tlie 



I r ! ! n . I — \ T-rTT i^ ^cn — ^cziri 



2. He form'd the deeps unknown : He gave the 



tlicir bound; 
I 



The wal' - ry worlds are all 



S 



-^ 



his owa. And all the 

E 






ciis: 



s 



3. Come, worship at his Ihroire, 
Come, bow before ilie LurJ : 
We are his works and noi our ow 
He form'd us by bis word. 



4. To day attend his voice. 

Nor liare provoke his rod; 
Cuiiie, like the people of his choice, 
And own your gracious God. 



S. But if your ears refuse 

The language of his c"ice. 
And hearts grow hard like siubborn Jews, 
That unbelieving race; 



5. The Lord, in vengeance dresi. 
Will lift his hand and swear. 

- " You that despise my promTsed rest 
Shall Jiave no >Hirtiuu there." 



SHERBURNE. L. M. 



fzrra » \ 



s piwji ^^g|^ ^^p^= g=te3g ^g^ 



^— - 



I. To God our voices let ua raise, And loudly chant the Joy • fill strain; That rock of strength oh let us praise 1 Whence fVec salva • lion we ob - tain. 



^1==]:: ^ 
~=^~ 



Ee^^^^ 



^■ 



E==P 



Ef 



f--^- 



-r-,^ 



rzc 



s 



2. Lot all whc 



feci, Come near and norsliip at his throne* Be - fore the Lord, thoir Maker, kneel. And bow in a ■ do • ra - tion down. 



tllgz^ 



§3s 



=F 






3=:^=: 



,s2z:«2;::a 



S 



^=f: 



s 



^ 



AYLESBURY. S. ]M 



Chetham. 



281 



I^ 



^§=^^^&_E^ 



nszitiizii 



:=zz=nr 



1. And am I oorn to die? To lay ihis bo • dy 

2. A land of deep - est shade, Unpierced by human 



=F- 



-&- 



BtiDZiiiEa 



Ihoughl; 



And mupt my trembling spt - rit fly In - to a world un knowi 

The drea - ry re • gions of the dead, Where all things are for - goil 




^^E^^ 



i^r 



3. Soon as from earth I go, What will be • come of 

4. Waked by the trumpet's sound, I from my grave shall 



E - ter - nal hap • pi - ness or wo Must then my por • tion be: 
And see the Judge with glo - ry crowned, And see the flaming skieal 



^ 



-a — a— s" 
I I — r~ 
I i r 



m 



fe. ^ ^ 



^' 



THZ 



i. How shall I leave my tomb? 
With triumph or regret? 
A fearful, or a joyful doom, 
A curse, or blessing meet? 



0. Will angel bands convey 
Their brother to the bar? 
Or devil? drag my sotil away. 
To meet its sentence there? 



Who can renolve the doubt 
Thai tears my anxious breast? 

Shall [ be with the damn'd cast out. 
Or numbcr'd with ihe bless'd? 



& I must from God be driven. 
Or with my Saviour dwell ; 
Must come at his command to heaven. 
Or else— depart to hell. 



JOY TO THE WORLD, (or PAXTON). C. M. 



282 



AMITY. 6,6,8,6.6.8 



ssge 



-: F^ 






^1 



=^^ 



1. How pleased and blest was I, To hear the people cry, "Come, let us seek our God to-day;" 



Yes, wilh a cheerful zeal, We haste to 



g 



i 



^ 



I 



^t-r 



^ 



it-^-^-k- 



'^ 



f 



u-m- 



hr-t- 



Yea, wilh a cheerful zeal, &.C. 




^^ ^JEpfe^pJ^pE^^ ^^fE^^^^a 



^«- 



with a cheerful zeal, Slc. 



(— r—T" 



E^^^^^i^^a 



Zion*8 hill, And there our vows and honours pay, And iheie our vows and honours pay. 



And there our vowa. &.« 



J. Zion, thnr« happy place, 

AdoniM Willi wiHulroua crare. 

Aoil walla of strenglh embrace the« r livl 
In thee our tnbes appear, 
To pray, and praise, and hear 

The sacfeU gosiiel's joyful sound. 

3. There Pavid's Exenter Son 
hus fix'd his royal throne: 

He sits fur grace and judgment ther* 

He bids tlie saint be pl.-ul. 

He makes the sinner sad. 
And huinble £uuU rejuice with fea. 

4. Mar peace attend thy gate. 
And joy witlun thee wail. 

To bless the soul of ev'ry Buest ; 
The man that seeks thy peace. 

And wislies tlime increase. 
A thousand blessings oq iiim rent 1 

6. My tongue repeats her vowi, 
" Pe:ire to thi« sacred lioilse !" 
For here niy friends and kindred il^eft: 
And sinr« my ki'Thius God 
Makei thee tiia blest abmle. 



NORTHFIELD. C. M. 



-e- 



i-nsi: J^ 



<S)— =— (• 



•=^ 



m^ 



K 



-^^=4^ 



3^i^ 



Inaafls. .^85 



:E^ 



^^N=f-H-^ ^-=£'^ 



How long, dear Jo • sua, oh ! how long Shall that bright hour de - lay ; 



Fly swiftly round, ye 





^ 



-^ 



^^^^=^::^= Wf^-\^^-^J ,^^^^^^E^ 



fzzE 



Fly swift - ly round, ye wheels of time, Fly 



FF^-^h-h ^ 



^ 



Fly swift - ly fcund, &c. 



And bring, &c. 



fc> ^. 



— I H^n 

^1 



Se 



i 



t 



vheels of Ume, And bring the pro - mised day, 



And bring 

-Si 



• ^ ^ 



sz:: 



the pro - - miscd day. 



1^^^^^^ 



swift - IV round, ye wheels ol 



And bhns, &a 



SS4 



WATCHMAN. S. M 



r^^^^zen^'iz^fcgg-z^ 



-^- 




1. Shall 'wisdom cry a - loud. And nether speech be heard ? The voice of Cnd's e ■ ter'. nal Word, De - serves il 

2. "I was his chief de - lisht. Ilia ev - cr - last - ing Son. Be - fore the first of all his work's, Cre 



^^^^g=g|: 



paid? 
be - guii. 



m 



^g^^gjgE^fe 



f£^: 



--4-' 



HIM. 



U^^i^- 



5 



r- 



s^^as 



3 "De-rore the flv • in; clouds. Be - fore the so - lid land, Be - fore the fields, be - fore the floods, I dwelt at his rie,.. hand, 

skm.. And built them, f was there To or - der when the sun should rise. And mar - shal ev' - ry star. 



4. •' V.'hcn he a - doriiM the- 




5. " When he poiir'd out the Eca, 

And spread the flowing deep, 
I pave the flood a firm decree 
In Its own bounds to keep. 



6. " Upon the etnpty air 

The earth was balanced well ; 

With Joy I saw the mansion whcro 

The sons of men should dwell. 



'My busv thoijchts at first 
On liieir B-Tlvation ran. 
Ere Rill was born, or Adam's durt 
Was fufibioD'd to a man. 



8. "Then come, receive my crace, 
Ye children, and be wise ; 
Happy the man that keeps ray wayi 
The man that shuns them dies." 



SPRAGUE. C. M. 



Arranged from J. Smith. 



_ GENTLE. 



=F-^---r 



ZljCliZA 



-JZ^T.ZSZ 



T I \ I 

nzrzziizziii 



l=F-:^J^ 



1. Give me the wings of faith, to rise With - in the veil, and 



The saints a - bove, how great their Joys, How bright their glo - rica be. 



e£S 



*— Tt 



IP- 



t ^m 



-»-R 



~F 



53 



lea 



=F 



m 



^rr^ir— ^ 



2 Once ihev were mourning here be • low. And wet their courh witb tears; They wrestled hard, aa we do 



i^ 



s 



^— £^&^- -- 



xzzirff~£ 



I g c 



With Pins an* loubls and fean 



-1 r 



-^-dz^= 



ARLINGTON. C. M. 



Dr. Arne.. 



285 






t-t:^ 



iblth: 

"i b«* 



EEE-e 






lo judgiiient brought, AnJ an 



'I — s»- 

- die Ihouglil. And ev'ry 



-tm-^zzz^., 



3s:: 



-^-— ^- 



■^=s: 



:^F 



^F-f 



P=^ 



- crct of my heart Sliall shortly be made kn 



WWM 



-H-f^ 



■B— ^ 



^S=E^S±7 



F^?E^ 



£ 



E/^- 



!ivc my just de - scrt For all tlial 



have done. 



i 



f^ 



a 



:2±^e[:r 



H 



1. 



3. How c!ireful llicn nusht I lo live I 
With wlial ri-ligious fear. 
Who gucli a strict account must give 
For my buhaviour here I 



4. Tliou auful Judge of qiiiclt End dead, 
The watchful power bestow; 
So shall I to my ways take heed, 
To all I speak or do. 



, If now tliou stairdest at the door, 
Olet Mie feel thee near I 
And make my peace with God, before 
1 al lliy bar appear 



I — Pv — 8 




MORNING WORSHIP, (or NATCHEZ). S. M 

^1 






-^-^-f 



:dZ' 



r[ 



lay Wliich breaks up - on the ear. 
Up to Je - ho - vah's throm 



When, at the hour of ris - ing day, Chris • lians u • nite in prayer, 
He lis - tens to their heaving sighs. And sends his bless ing down. 



S=^=ggg5-£j :^^^3EgiE E|^r^E^S^| 



3. So Je • EU3 rose to pray Be - fore the 

4. Clo • ry to God on high. Who sends his bles.-'ing? down. 



r-F 

light 






J^ 



s 



-I — I — ' 

1 I a 






Tc res • cu« so 

IZZJZZ 



ill • ing mount did stay. And 
jls condemned to die. And 



nrestle all the 
nake liis peo • pie 



?— ^J 



'^ 



:s?z:^: 



286 SlilRLAND. S. M 

1 My God, my Ule, my love, To thee, to lliee I call, I can - not live if thou re 



^f jf^fe^^^f 



:fe^f^^g^Epipg 



^EE^^ 



^M^ 



g 



E 



^^fe 



-P^: 



:^ 



r-rr 



2. Thy shi ning grace can cheer This dungeon where I dwell; 'Tis pa - ra dise when thou art 



:ef^ 




3. Tlic sinilings of thy face, 

How amiaUle they are ! 
'Tia heaven to rest in thine embrace, 
And no where else but there. 

4. To thee, and thee alone, 

The angels owe their bhss ; 
They sit around thy gracious throne, 
And dwell where Jesus is. 

5. Not all the harps above 

Can make a heavenly place, 
If Uod tiis residence remove, 
Or bji conceal hie face. 



C. Nor carih, nor all the sky 
Can one delight afford. 
No, not a drop of real joy. 
Without thy presence, Lord. 

7. Thou art the sea of love. 

Where all my pleasures roll. 
The circle where rav passions move 
And centre of my soul. 

8. To thee my spirits fly 

With iufinile desire. 
And yet how far from thee I lie 
Dear Jsbus. raise xl>^ iuflb«r. 



POKIUGAL. Ij. M 



287 




l=^^r 



-#- 



1. How pleasant, how di - vine - ly fair, Oh! Lord of hosts, thy dwell • ings are! 



With long de - sire my 



5^S^ 






^ — 



"23" 






T 9 



"23" 



3. My flesh would rest in thine a - bode, My pant - ing heart cries out for God ; 



s 



e^— ^ 



The sparrow ch 



^ 



=F=F 



f^-F 



:zz^ 



My God ! my King ! why 



g=H^^^^^^ 



3. The sparrow chooses where to rest. And for her young pro • videa her nest ; 



But will my God to 




So far from all my joys and thee ! 



P¥=g 



epar rowe grant 



That pleasure 



-^=F 



t5 



cluldren want t 



4. Blest are the saints who sit on high. 
Around thy throne of majesty ; 
Thy brightest glories shine above, 
And all their work is praise and love. 

!). Blest are the souls that find a place 
Within the tcT.ple of thy grace ; 
There tiicy behold thy geniler rays. 
And seek thy face, and learn thy praise. 

6. Blest are the men whose hearts are set 
To find the way to Zion's gate; 

God is their strength, and ihroiiffh the roau 
They lean upon their helper, God. 

7. Cheerful ihcy walk with growing strength, 
Till all shall meet in heaven at length, 
Till all before lliy face appear, 

And joia in nobler worship there 



i588 
- 



HEBRON. L. M. 



^Pg|^^^iE^§^.^E^g€ 



. Tliua far Ihe Lord has Icil me on. Thus far his pow'r prolo 
2. Much of my lime has run to wasle. And I. perhaps, am c 




iri_ 



Tz^ron^i 



:±it 



:^z 



iny days, And ev' - ry evening shall make known Sntne fresh me - mnrial of hia grace 
iiy home; But he forgives my fol - lies past. He gives uic strength for days lo come 



ffig^l^i^^ 



X I lay my bo - dy doxvn to sleep, Peace is Hie pil - low for my head, While welt- appoint • ed an - gels keep Their watchful etations round my bed. 
4. In vain the liiiia of earth or hell Tell me a thousand frightful things; My God in safe - ly makes me dwell Be - ncath the sha ■ dow of hii 




5. Thus when the night of death shall come, My flesh shall rest be - neaih the ground. And wait thy voice lo rouse the tomb. With sweet s 



- tion in the sound. 



ROCKBRIDGE. L. M. 



CJiapiji. 



5=^^Si^S^Ei^fe 



f=i^Fqp 



T r 






\-^ 



1. Life is the time to serve tlie Lord, The lime f ensure the great re • ward ; And while the lamp liolds oui to burn, Tlie vi - lest sin • ner may re • f^- 



-^^ 



FF 



k: 



F 



^F^gg^pg^ ^i^^jE^^fe a 



2. Life is the hour that God has giv'n To *scape from hell, and fly to heaven ; The day of grace, and mortals 



Be • cure the blessings of the day. 



-e— ^-^'-^- 



t:-i=3^i:^-r- 



■»~P~[;p-«^ 






3. The living know that thev must die. 
But all the dead lur^oi^fn lie. 
TiK-ir mrnutry and llic- fcnsc is gone, 
Alike uiikitutriiig and u"luiuwa 



4 Their hatred and their love is lost. 
Their envy buried in the dust; 
They have no share in nil ihnt *6 done 
Beneath Hic rircuU of the iuit. 



5. Then what my thoughts der-i^n lodo, 
My hands v»ith all your inii:lit pursue, 
Since no deviro, nor work is found, 
Vor failli. nor liupe, beiiecth the giuund- 



C. TiKTC arc no acts ot pamon past 
In the coiu yravc to which ive haatt. 
Itiit dofknes.':. death, arrd long (]cii(»aii 
Ucign lu civruai stlooco Uu:r« 




FHE NARROW WAY. L. M. 

eSe 



Rev. Andrew Grambhng. 



289 



^^gSi=^ 



3EFP; 



-F5^ 



s 



HTJ 



S^i^^ 



1. Come ye who know the Lord in • deed, Wh~i 



from Bin and bondage freed, Sub • mic lo all the na;9 of 

# 



EgP ^.E^ feEg g^PEg^5S=g ^^-^|^E^^ 



!. Great Iri - bu • la • lion you shall meet. But soon aball walk the gold • en street; Though hell may rage and vent her 



6=3: 



^^gP^ 



^ 



«g '*' 



F=p= c rn ~ g 



'SEI^'V 



*Ld2_ 







^= ^"^Pff 



row hap - py road 



SEsfc&^Epp 



eE.& 



--J^-J-^tr. 



his heart's de - light 



£=^ 



That awful day will soon appear, 
When Gatirid's trumpet you shall hear 
Sound through the earth, yea down to hetl, 
To call the nations great and email. 

4. 

To see the earth in burning flames, 
The trumpet louder here pror.Iaims, 
" The world shall hear and know her doom. 
The separation now ia come." 



6. 

"Ye evcrtasting doors fly wide, 
Make ready to receive my bride; 
Ye trumps of heaven proclaim abroad, 
Here comes the purchase of my blo«i.** 



In grandeur see the royal line 
In gliii'ring robes the sun outshine; 
See saints and angels join in one 
And march in splendour to the thron* 



Bi^hf'-I llic righteous marching home, \ They stand and vponder, and look ou— 

And %ll the angels bid them come; i They join in one eternal Bfing, 

WIp'e Christ, the judge, with joy proclaims, J Their great Redeemer to jdmire, 

" Ilrre come my saints, I*II own their names > While raolurcs set the' souls on Am 



•yii 



THE PENITENT'S PRAYER, (or AVON). CM 



Scottt.<n. 






■■^ 



T r 



r (~ 

1 oil 1 Ihou whose icn - der mer • cy hears Con . tri - lion's hum • ble sigh; Whose hand in - dul - gent wipes Ihe tears From sor . 



:FEE 



^1 




3. And shall my guilty fears prevail 
To drive me from thy ffeet? 
Oh I let not this dear refuge fail, 
Thifl only safe retreat. 



4. Absent from thee, ray Guide, my Light, 
Without one cheering ray; 
Through dangers, fears, and gloomy night. 
How desolate my way I 



Oh! shine on this benighted heart. 
With beams of mercy shine t 

And let thy healing voice impart 
A tasle of joys divine. 



MISSIONARY'S ADIEU. CM. 




Mvdoarest.Invely. native land. Where peace and pleasure Rrow, j Thy Sabbath's laws, and happy shores. 
Where joy, wilh fairest softest hand, Wipes olTttae tear of woe ; j ' ""^ ' 






\ 



DUKE STREET. L. M 






1. 'Tis by llje faith of joys to come We walk llirough deserts 

2. The want of siglit s!ie will sup-rliea; She makes the peafly ga 





^^EE^t^: 



3. Cheerful \vc tread the de • sert through, While faith inspires a heavenly ray, Though lions ruar and tcin - peats blow, And rocks and dau - gers fill the nay. 
A. So Abraham, by rii - vine com • mand, Lcrt hia own house to walk with God ; His faith be - held the pro - mised land, And fired liis zeal a - Jong the road. 



P5 



■s-V 



r^-a- 



2?: 



^p 



l^g^gg 



WARWICK. C. M. 



/. Stanley. 



ifc--— 



:^ 



f^ 



E^^jig g ^ l^^E^ ^^ ^ ^pEg^^ ^ 



1. Lord, in the morning thou shalt hear My voice a • scend - ing high; To thee will I di • rect iny prayer. To thee lift up mine eye. 

2. Thou art a God, be - fore whose sight The wicked shall not stand ; Sin - ners shall ne'er be thy de • light. Nor dwell at thy right hand. 



jjfe^ ilj'j:^^ 







■'i r 

3. but to thy bouse will I re • sort, To taste thy mer • ciea there; I will fre - quent thine ho - ly court. And wor - ship in Ihy lear, 

4. O may ihv spi - r't guide my feet lu ways of ri&iiteoua - ness; Make every path of du • ly straight And plain be ■ fore my face. 



W^S 



IT 



292 



RIPLEY. 8.-. 



Arranged from a Gregorian Chant, by L. Mason 



jBE|Eg5 a;;^^tr rrrf?-^^-4i^=»9^ l ^ ^^rt r^=f=H^ ij 



e-f 



g ^.=j _^^_;_^^ 



4 



^=^^^ N=j=j=^^^^=t=# 



'•Jf.ir'4».".vsr(r-"X TL.'Lm'"i'."?./:i-Js tvit,. *. .„id„.gi„,..di»..„, Th„i,.,.i,» ., 



g± 



^^H-f-^^^#j-r-rir^ 



i 



r'^-Kr^~¥- 



?=«: 



S 



k--k k k k- 



^S^ 



;:=»=i 



■— ■- 



^ 



=Q 



1 — r 



^HB 



^^ 



Saviour too ; Hu - man hopes have oft deccivea me, Thou art faithful, thou art true. 




Perish earthly fame and treasure. 

Come disaster, scorn and pain. 
In thy service pam is pleasure. 

With thy favour loss is gain : 
Oh ! 'lis not in grief to harm me. 

While thy bleeamg 'ove I see ; 
Oh ! 'tis not in joy to charm mt. 

When that love is Uid from rae 






WINTER. C. M. 



Kcca. 



293 



— I — I r-£s 



fe^ 



BBI^F^ 



^E 




ril-^ 



-"1— s: 



:^=7^n:zr 



P^ 



His hoary froal, his flt;.; ■ cy 



g^ggi^f^^p^iS 






.Descend and clothe tho groiunl, Tlie li - quid streams for - bear to fli 



•Q'F" 



=BS 



s 



fet ters bound 



THIS WORLD IS NOT MY HOME. C. M. 



^ri — 9 — \ — sr -l ti»^ jr 



^5 5?f7?f7 iy i?ey. Mr. Gamewell. 



^ &^E^^^^S^^^^± 



an read my ti • tie clear Co ma; 
*^ 



iSE^feS 



in the ekies, I'll bid fare • well to ev' - ry fear and wipe my weeping eyes. 



f-^r 






Chords. —This world is not my home, This world ia not my home, This ivorld's a wil - der • ness ol 



e, But hea - ven ia my bomu. 






F=^ 



Shniird eann a?.linst my soul rngagn. 

And fiery dnrts Xk hiirl'il. 
Then 1 car. smile al finian s raje. 

And face a fruwiiing world 



ipg^ ^^^^g=BE ^g3J^£ ^^|^ 



1 Let cares like a wiM dehige come. 

Andslormsnf snrrow fall. 

Ma. I but safely reach my lif>ir 

My tUod, my hoavfu. my all. 



4. Thpre I shall bathe my weary bouI 

In sfnsof heavenly rest. 

And not a wave of trouble roll 

Acri^iss my peaceful breast. 



5. When we've been there ten thousana yean, 
Brifihi Fhtning aslhuMun. 
We've no leea days to mng Godr praiae. 
Than when we first :'«vua. 



* Tbfl slur II OQlir yaoa ia aiDcing the chorus: io sineini; the verses, sins u if there was no slur. 



'294 



COME. YE DISCONSOLATE. DJC. 



^=e=^ J J| j^ 



s 



^^E ^P ^^g^E^ 



aizt 



■ ^ C J I il"^ 



a 



^r^^^ ^ ^^ffl^^^^^^ 



^ti^^U: 



1. Come, ye dis • con - so - late, where'er ye languish: Come to the mcr - cy - seat, fer - vent - ly kneel; Here bring your 



s 



^^ -^ ^t-^ 



iffzS: 



3t£3l3: 



-t:=hz±: 



fEE 



'9 ' m a 

f=g=F 



£g^ 



-f-6j- 



^: 




g 



:i=P: 



fc£ 



Pr^H 









^^ 



B-=-H- 



rg^T- 



*^^ 



a 



2. 

- Joy of the desolate, light of the straying, 
Hope of the penitent, fadeless and pure, 
Here speaks the Comforter, tenderly saying, 
Earth has no sonow that heaven taniioi 
cure. 



3. 



Here see tlie bread of life ; see waters flowing 

woimded hearts, here tell your anguish ; Earth has no sor - row that heaven car • not heal. f"°"'' ff"'" ''>« ''"■°"8 °^ ^°^' P^r* ^'°"> 

above : 
Come to the feast of love ; come, ever know- 
ins 
Eiirih has no sorrow b'li neaven ran roino»» 




GLASGOW. L. M. 



Oare. 



295 



ipF-: 



p-=5-T- 



E^ 



i 



=P— 



tSi- -<S»-|-P~^- 



gg^gj l^g g ^ 



T~g~ 



p-#- 



This life's a dream, an emp - ty show. 



But the bright world to which I 



ISTJS 



— g » IP • 



^ 



v^- 



fetSSE^ 



^=3 



P=feEffli^ 



"rm? =f^ 



1 ~r r 



^^ 



^SgBjp^ 



-TT>-^- 



^ 



joys BUD - Stan - tial and sir. - cere ; When shall I wake, when shall 1 wake and find me there. 



\^±: 



■"-P=P=F 



^^g^^^^.^ C^i i£^!^ ^F^^ 



le 



296 



NEWBURGH. S. M. 



±i 



■fg - • |»- -^5>-^ 



Manson. 



^ 



F^=F 



^ 



1. Lei eve - rv creature join To praise ih' e - ter - • nal God ; 



p; 



^t:I^:±4g ^ 



Ye heaven - ly hosts, the song be - gin, Ye 



^t^iP 



Kzn — ^ 



I 1 



WOJf. 



-esi-^ 



^i 



Ye heavenly hosts, the song 



be - gin. 



Ye 



F=f=F=^ 



f=E 



r— =—*- 



js=:e 



=^=F=F 



-=r^ 



=^ 



heavenly hostB, the song be - gin, And sound his name a - broad. 



*ZZIk 



^.^ 



^^m 



And moon with pa - ler 



'^S 



E 



heavenly hosts, the song be - gin. And sound his name a - broad. 



^^=i -i ~^t r=r^ ^ 



p 



^ 



And moon with pa - ler 



T — r 



bea^'enly hosts, &c. 



— y-^- yf r i r iip - p 



Thou sun «vith oold - en beaioa. Ana uiooa witb pa - let 



NEWBURGH. (Concluded.) 



897 



0~^ 



^ fE ^ ^ ^rttn i^P^P^I PFFrPF ^gP i 



lays, Yc starry lights, ye twinkling flames, Shine to your Maker's pral"* Ye starry lights, &.c. 



-^^ 



E^^^p^^ ^^iPI 



Ye starry lights, ye twinkling flames. Shine to your Maker's praise. 

1 2 



^=F=^ 



ifeEl 



^S 



&^ 



m 



:^S5= 



Ye starry lights, &c. 



8. He built those worlds above, 

And flx'd tbcir wond'rous frame ; 
By his command they eland or move, 

And ever speak his name. 
Ye vapours, when ye rise, 

Or fall in showers or snow. 
Ye thunders murm'nng round the skiea. 

His power and glory show. 

3. Wind, hail, and flashing fire, 

Agree to praise the Lord, 
When ye in dreadful storms conspire 

To execute his word. 
By all Ills works above 

His honours be exprest ; 
Bui saints that taste his saving love 

Should sing his praises best. 

FAUSE I. 

4. Let earth and ocean know 

They owe their Maker praise ; 
Ptuise him, ye watery worlds below, 
And monsters of the seas 



From mountains near the sky 
Let his high praise resound, 

From humble shrubs and cedars high, 
And vales and fields around. 



9. Ye lions of the wood. 

And tamer beasts that graze, 
Ye hve upon his daily food. 

And he expects your praise. 
Ye birds of lofty wing, 

On high his praises bear; 
Or sit on flowery boughs, and sing 

Your Maker's glory there. 

6. Ye creeping ants and worms, 

His various wisdom show. 
And flics, in all your shining swarms. 

Praise him that dress'd you so. 
By all the earth-born race 

His honours be expcept : 
But saints that know his heavenly grac6 

Should learn to craise him beat. 



7. Monarchs of wide command. 

Praise ye th' eternal King ; 
Judges, adore that sovereign hand 

Whence all your honours spring. 
Let \igorous youth engage 

To sound his praises high ; 
While growing babes, and withering a^a, 

Theur feebler voices try. 

8. United zeal be shown 

His wond'rous fame to raise; 
God is the Lord : his name alone 

Deserves our endless praise. 
Let nature join with art. 

And all pronounce him blest ; 
But saints that dwell so near his heait 

Should sing his praises boat. 



29'^ 



THE WEARY PILGRIM'S CONSOLATION. 12,ll,12,li,12,i2.12.1l. 



C. H. Farr 




^^^ 




1. How sweet to reflect on the joys that await me In yon blissful region, ihe haven of rest. ? y rirrleH In ll<rhi Tn,l wiih olnrv rn ishrniirle.l 
Where glorified spirits with welcome shall greet me, And lead me to mansions prepared for the blest ; 5 ^" "'"^^"^ '" "S^'' ""'^ " '"> g'^^^ <=" shrouded. 



r^^ 



'r^g^f^^f^g^Pp^g^ 



XZL 



3=f: 



fes^^ 



i^g 



S2:»: 



,— -a-B-h- -n-. 



^S^Se^ 



a 



'•^" "gr 



i 



^Em^m^m^ 



g 



p-»-»-»-» 



5 



^^^^SeSJ 



My hap - pinesg per - feet, my mind's sky unclouded, I'll balho in the ocean of pleasure unbounded, And nmge with delight through the Eden of love. 



i 



in 



U 



^ 



i 



g 



-H- 



? 



Size: 



TiZtZTLtZ 



^ While angelic legionR, with harps tuned cetetitial, 
Harmoniously Join in the concert of praise, 
Tlie auiiits, a« they flock from the recions terrestrial, 

In luud hallelujah their voices will raise; 
Hien Bon^vto iheLainbshall reecho through heaven, 
Mv B'»ul will rp9fK)nil, to Iininanuol be c'ven 
All glory, all honour, all micht and ilnniinion. 
WI»o bnjukht ufl. through tract: lo the F>l.ui v( Invfc 



1 Th'^n hail, blessed state I hail, ye songsters of glory I 

Ye narpers of bliss, soon I'll meet you above. 

And Join your full choir in rehearsing the storv* 

Salvation from sorrow throuch Jesus's love; 
Though prison'U in earth, yet by aritiripaiion 
Alreaily my Kurit feels a swret prelibation 
Of joy»i that atvnit mc when freed from protiaiion 
Mv befirt 's now in bettVcM .he Kden of love 



CORONATION* C. M. 



Hdldrn. 



J99 




— : a »' 



^ 



d crown him Lord «f all. Bring 



1. All hail the power of Jesus' naoie ! Let angels prostrate fall ; Bring forth the royal di - a • dem, And crown him Lord «f all. Bring 



I^ZHIL-^. 



£EE 



All hail the power of Jesus' name ! Let angels prostrate fall ; 



And crown him Lord 




2. 

Crown him, ye martyrs of our God, 

Who from his altar call ; 
Extol the stem of Jesse's rod. 

And crown him Lord of all 



Ye chosen seed of Israel's race, 
A remnant weak and small . 

Hail him who saves you by his grace, 
And crown him Lord of^ all. 



Ye Gentile sinners, ne'er forget 
The wormwood and the gall ; 

Go— spread your trophies at his feet, 
And crown him Lord of all. 



Babes, men, and sires, who T^now his 1 )Ta, 
Who feel your sm and thrall. 

Now join with all the hosts abovs. 
And crown him Lord of all. 

6. 
Let every kindred, every tribe, 

On this terrestrial ball. 
To him all majesty ascribe. 

And crown him Lord of a)L 



Oh that, with yonder sacred thron^, 

We at his feet may fall ! 
We'll join the everlasting song, 

And crown him Lord of all. 



• Thij tune wns a preal favoiiritc with the late Dr. Dwight. It was onen nuni; by the College Choir, while he. ' 
«nd lead them with tbR mcwt u'lent devotion." — IncidcnU in the Lift ijf Pruidtnt Disi^ix, u. Jfi 



alchiQS, as i 



Q. the inspiration (if ttle heavenly world, would Join ,bei]i 



sm 



MILLEDGEVILLE. C. M. 



'•Si^^^§^^ 



fz^ 



On gtna I parts from litv. A. Gramhtinc 






d^ 



k with God, A calm and heavenly fra 



^:g^^jEgiEpiif|Pllli 



A lisht to Ehine 



T- 



PE 



'.^1^1 



the road That leads me 



the blessed - ness I knew When first I naw the Lordf 



Si^^^SSSiflit 



the Boul - re • fresh - ing 



and his wnrd? 



^^Si^m^^^^^^^^^^M^ 



3. What peaceful hours I then enjoy'd? 
How 8«'ei^ their nipinory still I 
But now I find an ochinj void 
The world can never fill. 



4. Return, oh holy Dove! return. 
Sweet messencer of rest! 
I hate the sins that iriade thee mourn. 
And drove thee from my breant. 



5. The dearest idol I have known, 
Whnle'er that idol be. 
Help nie to tear it from thy throne, 
And worship only thee. 



6. So Bhall my walk be close with God, 

Calm and serene my frame ; 

Bo purer light 8h.^ll mark the road 

That leads lue to the ^mb. 



ROCKINGHAM. C. M. 



M: 



^ 



Chapin. 



is^s^^^^^M^ia 



Come, hap-py aouls, ap • proach your God Willi ne 



lo - dioui songs; Come, tender 



Al - migh • ty grace The tri - butea of your tongues. 



il^^^ggii^^^^^ii^il^gpi 



S. So strange, so boundless 



the love That pitied dy 



en, The Fq • the 



qu.il Son To give them Itfp a - gain. 



s^^^^giPi^^^PiSSS=i 



i 



T Thv haniR. i)ear jesiif. wer^ not 
W'iih a reveniriiic t<Hl ; 
No hard coii)rni»(tiori lo perform 
The veiitfeitoM of a Goa 



4. But oil was mnrcy. a!l was mild. 
And wrnth fornnok the ihrone, 
When Christ nn ihe kind errand ( 
Aad brouf ht salvatiun down. 



, Here, sinners, ynu may hcnl your wounds, 6. Sop, denrepi I.nrd. nur willing soiiii 

Anil wipe yiiiir liorn.wsdry ; Acc^-pi lltine oII'.tM crac". 

Trust in ih»' mmhiy Saviour* name, We bless the ^reaf Redu*fnier'M low 

Aud yuu Khali never die. And eive the Patber prvs* 



THE TRUMPETEKS. C. M 



1. Ilarkl lis - ten lo the trum - pel ■ eral They snund for vol - un - tecrsi I „, . 

On Zi - on'8 brigbl and flow' . ry niounl De - Ijold the of - d - cers— j "™>f norjes white, their garmenls brigirt With crown ami 




a flame; A sol . dier I will be, 
And light for lib - er • ly. 



. fi -cers— I "^^^^i^ horsea white, their garments brigirt With crowo ani» 



f=p=p 



They want no cowarda in their band, (They will their 
-k kr-^ fcs- 



jgiznz 



^m 



«=p=p= 



^ 



fe^ 



f=r 



^- 



bow they Maud, En - list , iiig sol ■ diers for their King, To march for Canaan'a land. 



^■^p^^^ESg^Si^iSgS 



to • loura fly,) But call for valiant • hearted 



en, Who're not a - fraid to die. 



¥333 



F 



Ei^i^ 



iH 



nit tirmieg now are in paiade, 
How martial they a|int.Ar ! 

\t\ arin'd and driess'diri uniform, 
Thcv look lit<- n.»ii of war 



They follow their frcal Oene 
The grral F.a-roal LamL 

lliu earineiiiH staiii'd with hi! 
KrilE Jei)U9 '9 liiH naioe 



4. The trumpet aotinds, the armici ihollt. 

And drive the hosts of hell ; 
How dreadful is our God in arms I 

'J'he great Imnianuel !— 
Binners, enlist with Jesus Christ 

Th' eternal Son of God, 
And march wilh us to Canaan's land. 

Beyond the swelling llood. 

y There is a green and flow'ry (ield, 

Where fruils inunorlal grow; 
There, clolhed in while, the angels brigbl 

Our great Redeemer know. 
We'll shout and sing for evermore 

In that eternal world; 
But Satan and his armies loo. 

Shall down to hell be hurl'd 



6. Hold up your heads, ye soldifrs bold, 
Redemption 's drawing nigh 
We soon shall hear the iruiii|iet sour, 

■Twill shake bolli eorlh and sky; 
In fiery chariots then we '[i rty 

And leave the world on i.-» 
And tneet around the starry Ihrolw 
T,> tune th' immortal ivr«- 



302 



LONG SOUGHT HOME. C. m. 



y\i{liam Jiobn. 



-MT'-'-r-^- 



ggggP^ 



^^^^^^^ 



'izm 



J Je . ni - sa - lem, my happy home. Oh! how 1 long for ihee ! When will my sorrows have an end, Thy joys when shall I seel 



2. Thy walls are all of precious stone. Most glorious to be - hold ! Thy gaies are rich - ly set with pearl. Thy streets are paved witn gold. 




^^I^S 



a ^g^ggBi^^ tt 



Home, sweet home, my long sought home. My home m hearen a • bove. 

_, n. 

j_ri n-am s »\ r i i.-li 



^ESEB^ 



gg£ 



3i± 



t 



Home, sweet home, my long sought home. My home in heaven a - bove. 



ipsg^p Sgpg^a 



3. Thy gardens and thy pleasant greens, 

My study long have been ; 
Such sparkling lif:ht, by human sight, 
Hos never yet been seen. 
Home, sweet home, &.C. 

4. If heaven be thus glorious, Lord, 

Why should I stay from thence : 
What folly 't is that I should dread 
To die and go from hence ! 

5. Reach down, reach down thine arm of 

grace. 
And cause me to ascend, 
Where congregations ne'er break up. 
And sabbaths never end. 

6. Jesus, my love, to glory 's gone ; 

Him will I go and see ; 
And all my brethren here below 
Will soon rnme after nte. 



, My friends, I bid jrou all adieu ! 
I leave you in God's caro ; 
And if I never nice see you. 
Go on, — I '11 nieei you there. 
Home, sweet home, &-c. 
There we shall meet and no more part. 
And heaven shall ring with praise j 
While Jesus' love, in every heart, 
Shall tune the song free grace. 
. And if our fellowship below 
In Jesus be so sweet. 
What heights of rapture shall we know 
When round the throne we meet ! 
, Millions of years around may run — 
Our songs shall -still go on. 
To praise the Father and the Son 
And S-pirit, — Thret in One. 
Home, sweet hom*. Ice 




INVITATION. 8,7,4. fNe^.l 

1-N 



303 



^=^ 



?^^ 



i 



:tze-i 



-n 



^S^iP 



1. Come, ye sin - ncrs, poor and wretch -- ed, Weak and wound - ed, sick ana sore; i He is a- ble, He is »- 

Je - BUS rea - dy stands to save you, Full of pi - ty, love, and pow'r ; / 



e--^i 



Ho! ye thirst -y, come and wel - come, God's free boun - ty glo - ri - /y;\ 
True be - lief and true re - pent - ance, Ev' - ry grace that brings us nigh, / 

1 2 

F4" 



SE 



tt: 



^- 



^^^P^ 



n 



With - out mo - noy. With - out mo- 

Eg; 



^1 



3. Let not con -science make you lin - ger, Nor of fit - ness fond - ly dream ; 1 ^^^ j^^ -^^ jj^j^ j^^ -^^ 

All the fit - ness he re - quir - eth, Is to feel your need of him; / 




you ; 'Tis the Spi - rit's ris 
4. Come, jro weary, he^vy laden, 
Lost and tuiuM l>y thc!ft.U; 
If you tarry till you're biitter. 



i-o 



iVilll 



lat £ll: 



- ing beam. This he gives 

5. A iew him prostrate in the garden; 
On tlie j;i<-iund your Saviour liesl 
On the Uoaly true behold Liia; 
Hear bim crv. before be dies, 
'•UiBfH.isbud!" 
Sinuerr., will not liii.-. suHioe I 



you, This ho gives you, 'Tis 

6. Lol th' incarnate fiod, ascending, 
I'leatls the merit of bis blood : 
Venture on him, venture wholly, 
J^et no other trust intrude : 
.Niuio but .Icsua 
Cau do helj'leiis siuucrs good. 



the Spi - rit'a ris - ing beam. 

7. Saints and angels, jnln'd in concert, 

Sing the praises of the I.ainb; 

While the blissful se.its of heaven 

tsweetly echo with his name. 

ilallolujnhl 

Siuuers here luay .Mutf the sum*. 



304 




4-f 



MERCY'S FREE. 9,6,9,8,8,8,6. 



Leonard P. Breedlove. 



^ 



^^-I^ 



^^ifp^ 



1. What'8 this that in my soul is ris-ing? Is it grace ? Is |t S^ace ? \ ^^j^ ^^^^ ^^^j.^ i^ ^^^^ be - gun, It makes me strive all 

Which makes me keep for mcr - cy cry - ing, la it grace ? Is it grace T j 



=¥^ 



i 



^^m 



£efP^ 



3 



-^4 



S 



-• „,?"''w,°'^ "^ '°-'' ^ "? ^"' r°i"' A?"""^'' f^'iM*''"^'" f"""; I Though mercy's free, our God is just, And if a soul should 
Though I ve no price at all to ten - der, Mer-cy s free ! JUer-cy a free ! J o j < i > 



^ ^ .1, =^ 

-0^-r — 0- 



, h I: h = 



w~^ 



s 



(g#-^ 



44 



£EapE^ 



f^ 



"^ "^ I I I I I I ^~l I T~ 



sin to shun, It plants my soul be-neath the sun, Mer-cy's free ! Mer-cy's free 1 



f^r-rNr^^ 



1= ■• -^ ^ 



m 



ere be lost, This will tor-ment the sin - ner most, Mer-cy 'a free! Mer-cy 'a freel 



^^^i 



Xr=l^ 



-f-f- -f- 



^ 



^=F 



8. Swell, swell the heavenly chorus, 

Mercy's free ! Mercy's free ! 
The devil's kingdom falls before us, 

Mercy's free 1 Mercy's free ! 
Sinners, repent, inquire the road 
That leads to glory and to God, 
Come, wash in Christ's atoning blood, 

Mercy's free ! Mercy's free I 

4. This truth through all our life shall cheer na, 

Mercy's free ! Mercy's free ! 
And through the vale of death shall bear U8, 

Mercy's free ! Mercy's free 1 
And when to Jordan's bunks we come, 
And cross the raging billow's foam, 
AVe'll sing, when safely landed home, 

Mercy's free! Mercy's freel 



WHEN I AM GONE. 10s & 8s. 



i-a^- 






£ 



£ 



;z3: 



£ 



=^ 



V 1^ 



^. K. Turner. 305 

;» — ? 



fj-fv ^ |"r c"X | fi k i 



p^- 



1. Shed not a tear o'er your friend's ear-ly bier, When I am gone, when I am gone: 1™. 
Smile when the slow-toll - ing bell you shall hear, When I am gone, when I am gone. / " 




for me as you stand round my graTe, 



t-^r e rl^lfe i^ 



h N JL 



Shed not a tear as you all kneel in prayer. When I am gone, when I am gone: Iq. , 
Sing a sweet song when my grave you shall see, When I am gone, when I am gone. J ° 



the Lamb who on earth once was slain 



w^m 






- p i a- 



^ 



Plant yon a rose that shall bloom o'er my grave, When I am gone, when I am gone : \ p ■ 
Sing a sweet song, such as an - gels may have. When I am gone, when I am gone. J ' 



the Lord that I'm freed from all care, 















































Q \^ 


a 


■ a 


■ o o m 






^ 


S 




■ a 




« 


l» » ir 


/ ii 


a . , - 




pa .yl - 


_1 


A — &-4p- 










-» — ^ — e- 






O— 




^—Y- 




HIL 


fr^— 


— f--f^ 


!!:=*» ^ 


1 ^ ^ 


— ' — 


1 ^ 1^ 


— 


"^ 





^— 


^=f- 




n 





=F= 


\^-^- 


j^ 1^ 


=iF 


Think who has died his be - lov - cd to save, Think of the crown all the i 


an-som'd shall wear. 


When I am gone, I am gone. 


n It ^ ' 






\y •n ' m L 










' ' " 




• ■ * 




^^ 






1 


/ # 


d > 


** 


B B 








1 B 




[ 1 


n 




1 ■ i» 


!■ ' 


1 










V ^ 


\ 


y ^ V 




1 




1 ^ t* 


r 


\ 




r 


- 


^ ig 


\M/ 


'.0 ^ 


d a 




1 1 




r- \ 




k** 


K" 




1 




I am gone, 


> 






R 


Bing to the 


Lamb who in 

~* r 


hea - ven doth 


reign. 


1 ^^^ > 
Sing till the 

see 


earth shall be 


iU'd with nis 


name, 


When 


I am gone. * 


P-^— 


-U^ 


4-^^ 


d 


-f-k^- 


-^ 


-t-^uJ 


-T 

b 


-^^ 


^ 


-f-^k 






-d 




I.H- 




«^. 


^Vk 



Fray ye the Lord that my joys you shall share, Look up on high and be-Ucvcthat I'm there, When 1 am gone, I am gone. 
20 



o06 



ALL IS WELL. P.M. 



J. T. WhiU. 



^:^ 




i: 



f=F=F 



1. What's this that steals, that steals tip - on my framel Is 
That soon will quench, will quench this mor - tal Same. Is 



eath? 
death! 



is it death ? 



u SSi} " "■• '• ■"■"■. ■ 



^=^^ 



=f= 



^ 



?£ 



^ 



2. Weep not, my friends, my friends weep not for 
My sins for - giv'n, for - giv'n, and I am 



me, 
free, 



All 
All 



Sfe 



well! 
weU! 



All 
All 



is well ! 
is well 



1} 



There's not a cloud that 



^irr7~r 



fft^=^T^ 



^ 



m 



^ 



g 



23EP^ 



S: 



lall the Kine of 



soon shall be From ev* - ry pain and sor - row free, I shall tne King of glo 



eee. All is well 1 All i3 well I 




S. Tane, tuDO your harps, your harps, ye Fainta on higL, 
AUL) well, All isweUI 
I too will strike my harp with equal joy, 

Alt Is well, All U well! 
Hrifrht anpels are from glory coiqp, 
Th^y'ro round mv bed, thpy'rn in my room, 
Th«y wail Lu wuji ntv spirit humv- 

▲11 is WeU. *111« w«Iil 



«. Ilarkl bark I my LonJ, my Lord and Maeter's t 
Calls away, Calls away I 
I soon shall see — enjoy my happy choice, 

Why delay, \niy delay I 
Farewell, my friends, adieu, adieu, 
I can no Ioiif;er Btay wjth yoii, 
Wy glitteriug cruwii iippc:ir< in vifw. 

All W wttll. >llkWAU 



IlaU! haill all hail! all hail! ye blood-wash*d throng, 

Saved by grace, Saved by Krace — 
I come to join, to join your rapturous sonc. 

Saved by grace, Saved by gns* 
All, all is pcrue and joy divine. 
And hi'.-iven nnd glory now »r«« mtoft, 
Luud halUtlujiOiti U> th^ Ijoubl 

AU U wvo. All V «^ 



ELTHAM. 7s. TDouble.) 



L. Mason. From the Carmina Sacra. 



307 



1. Hast - en, Lord, the glo - nous time, Wlien, be - neath Me3 - si - all's sway, Ev* - ry na - tion, ev' - ry climo 
D. C. Sa - taa anJ his host, o'er - throtrn, Bound in chains, shall hurt no more. 




f^- J^E^ ^Ef 



G-r 



S^ 



3^ 



4^ 



2. Then shall wars and tu - mults cease, Then be ban - ish'd grief and pain; Right - ecus - ness and joy and peace 

D. C. All his might - y acts re - cord, All his wond - rous love pro - claim. 



w 



=f= 



3 r F 

o I i : 



?^ 



^^ 



. Pv 



.-i^^J J l i ^- I fgpff 



Shall the gos - pel call o - bey. 



Might-iest kings his pow'r shall own, 



Hea-thea tribes his name a - dore j 



¥ 



3^3 



tiz-f—t 



M . a a 



^^S 



Ua - dis - turbed shall ev - er reign. 



Bless we, then, our gra - cious Lord, 



Ev - er praise his glo-rioas name, 



i^^3 



rrrp^ 



?^ 



-o-^ 






SOS 



THE YOUNG CONVERT. L.K.. 



3. EiU. 









P=:is[ 



T=3=? 



rj- : J J I 



E3 



1. When con -verts first be - gin to sing, Won - der, won - der, won - der, "I .pj^^jj, q^^^^ jg all re - deem - ing love— 

Their hap - py Bonis are on the wing, Glo - ry, hal - le - l-i jah. J _ _ 



""< ^" 



f=E 



1=1 



-m 0' 



^ 



§ 



2. They won - der why old saints don't sing, 
And make God's earth -ly tern - pies ring, 



Won -der, won - der, won -der; I -j^ view them-selves up- on the shore— 
Glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jah!/ •' 




Glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jah ! Fain would they 
^^ ^ ' * f f~^^ 



with Christ a - hove, Sing glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jah ! 




il^ifel 



(Ho rj ha) - le - lu - jah! And earth ap - pears like heav'n a - bove. Sing, glo - ry, hal ■ le - 1m iah ' 



EDEN OF LOVE. 12,11,12,11,12,12,12,11. 



3U9 



^^=e-^ 



w 



rzL 



^=P3=^eES 



r==i 



r^zp 



"=rl® ^ri 



anpiz^irr^i^ 



-4=F 



r±nzziz± 



in Ton Dii.<w-iui re-CTon, trie na-ren oi rest, r _ , i . . i. • * j -ii. i 

And io-lme to maiLsicua pre-pared fur the blest I / Eu - cir-cled In l.gUt, and with glo - ry 




^ ^^^rrlriirr p ^ OT^Kh^ ag^B 



^:irTPf 



^^BE 



•S-B- 



ii 



2. While an-^el-ic lo-gions. ivith harps tuned oo - lea - tial, liar - mo - ni-ously join In the con-cert of praise. 

The saints, as tho flock from the ro-gions ter - re3 - trial, la loud hut-la - lu-jahs their voi-cea will raise: 



g E?ff rt ^ ^ ^rrtr7l7rT# ^ 



rT i P 



Then flon^i to the Lamb shall re - ech - o through 



T — T 



fH-f-szf^fgzfesd : 



6. Then hail, bleas-ed Btate! Ilail, ye eong-sters of glo - ry ! Ye hnrp-«ra of bH.ss, eoon I'll meet you a - bore. 

And join your full choir *n re - hears-ing the eto - ry, 



le nnrp-ers oi nuiia, eoon i it meet jou a- oove, r „, u • '»• *», * v ^i ■ 

&.1 - T»-tion ftom Borrow, through Jo - sus-a love .-" j Thoush Pnson i m earth, yet by «n - ti - ci- 






u-irn i rr 






rffr^'W 



fihroud - ed, My hap-pi - ness perfect, my mind's sky un-cloud - ed. Til bathe In the o-cean of pleasure un-bound - ed. And range with de-light thro' the E - den of Love. 



FfF#^g^flfff ^ a^^W:;;^3lfg ft FfMfi 



hca • ven. My soul will re-spond, To Im-m.inuel be giv - 



All glo-ry, all honour, all might and do - min • Ion, Who brought us thro* grace to the E - Jen of Love. 



fete^Etesis 



Ffi ^rT^-lWffi^fFi 



^^^1 



g 



^-^- i^T^T^ir 



pa • UoE, Al - reeJ-y my bouI leeU a sweet preli - be - tion Of joys that await me, when freed from proba - tion : BIy heart's now in heaven, the B tJen of Love. 



310 



^F~y 



THE SHEPHERD'S STAR. 11,10 

g? 



£=K 



-.-r- 



ill I I — h I I 



1. Hail the blest morn I see the great Me - di - a - tor Down from the re-gions of glo - ry de-scendl Shepherds, go wor-ship the 



■^—0 



1 



^Dl 



2. Cold on his era- die, the dew-dropa are shin-ing; Lour lies his bed with the beasts of the stall; An-gela a - dore him, in 



g 



g 



£^ 



SI 



-^B- 



PP? 



3. Say, shall we yield him, in cost - ly de - vo - tion, - doura of E - den, and off' -rings di-Tine, Gems from the moun-tains, and 



-^-^ 


n — i 


I 




rr-f-i 


t~i 






3 


w 


D 


y 


A 




w 




\ -^ 


f 






\ k 














1 


m^ 




r 






1 


















B 


vU) 1 




















d 


babe in the man-ger, Lol for his guard, the bright an -gels at - tend. 


V 


^ .^ 




r* 




3 ^ ^ 






A ^ r h- 


K* 






n_ 


L 


■^ 






' 


^ 


l\ 




ffh ' r 


^ W r: 


id m 




^ 


•■ 


















vky 


r '^ 




- 


















slum-bers re - clin - ing. Wise men and shepherds bo - fore him do fall. 


(?)■ ^ 


- # 






■ 


p 


• m 


r 


vir ' 






' ' 


1 




■ ^ 




=" 




i 






1 




f^ ^ 








' 




1 1 


11^ 


_ 






r r ' 






1 


—J 


1 1 





pearls from the o - cean. Myrrh from the for -est. and gold from the mine! 



4. Vainly we offer each ample oblation, 

Vainly with gold we his favour secure; 
Richer by far is the heart's adoration ; 
Itearer to God are the prayers of the poor. 

5. Low at his feet we in humble prostration. 

Lose all our sorrow and trouble and strife; 
There we receive his divine consolation. 
Flowing afresh from the fountain of life. 

6. Ho is our friend in the midst of temptation. 

Faithful supporter, whose love cannot fail ; 
Rock of our refuge, and hope of salvation. 

Light to direct us through death's gloomy vale 

7. Star of the morning, thy brightness, declining, 

Shortly must fade when the sun doth arise: 
Beaming refulsrenl. his glory eternal 

Shines ou the children of love in the slue* 



PRECIOUS BIBLE. 8,7,8,7,7,7. 



311 




s 



rrwrrtmrtft 



1. Pre-cious Bi - ble, what a trea-sure, Does the word of God af-ford ! 1 ,„. ,, „ 1,1 „„,„„„*„„ „„„_ it„„ ■•„_ .»,;= t ™„„t «„ .^„.o 

,„ T .. !■ ff 1 i> J II • u- ij J >Let the world ao-count me poor, Hav-ing this, 1 want no more. 

All I want for life or pleasure, Food or meu cine, shield or sword. J r > d > 



-2H- 



^ 



^^ 



3 



^^^ 



las^ 



^gl 



^^ 



2. Food 
Of ex 



towhichtheworld'sastran-ger, Here my hun-gry soul en-joys Hq^ ^ dy-ing Christ I feed, He is meat and drink iu-deed. 
ex - cess there 13 no dan - ger, Though it fills, it nev - er cloys. J jo 



^^m 



m;nin\ t\t-m^ m^ 



SP? 



jg — *" 



^^tii 



AMITY. 7s. (Double.) (Or C Unes, by omitting the repeat.) 

8 



^s 



SEE 



ES 



E 



miEi: 



^ 



^^ 



wt 



Peo-ple of the liv - ine God, I have sought the world a - round, 1 »t 1 _ • ■» . m <• • .• ui * 

rt.i,.' J xjT. jii. u j> jV Now to you my spir-it turns, Turns a fu - gi - tive un-blest ; 

Paths of am and sor- row trod. Peace and com-fort nowhere found ; / '•""'>' .'"J'f > f> > 



*=± 



tzjijlirf 



^ 



§--rz3=*=^^=* 



EDns: 



D. C. Brethren, where your al - tar burns, Oh! re-ceive me in - to rest. 

1 2 



a^^ 



S^ 



^ 



iii 



:i2: 



^^?^3^ 



-&S Ic tK- 



i 



312 



CONDESCENSION. CM. 



^^^w-^^n^^'fjf^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^mi^ffwf ^ 



1. How con-desceniing and how kind Was God's eter-nal Son ! 



iwmmm^ 



Our mis'ry reach'd his heav'niy mind, And pi - ty brought him down. 
-£l M .=r=^^=^^ 1 2 



^m 



9p^^ 



¥^' 



^ 



2. When justice, by our sins provoked, Drew forth its dreadful sword, He gave his soul up to the stroke, With - out a murm'ring word. 



m 



? 



t 



^ 



g^SiS^^i^ 



31 s: 



i^^rrryrH 



SWEET HEAVEN. L. M. 



f=f^ 



^j ^rlT'ij ^ ^ 



I'^^^F^FF^ 



i 



zsmztjuif 



1. Je • Fus, my fill, to heav'n is gone. He whom I fix my hopes up - on': ) _ rt»._i ii-.», <^...».. ... , 

Uia track I ese, and I'U pur ■ sue The nar - row way till him I view: / '^™'"'^~<' '■'»'^°' "'««"'<*^ "• I long for theel when shaU I get tbcre! 



TRAVELLING PILGRIM. L. M. 2 line* 



313 




LONG TIME AGO. 8s&4s. 



?^ 



B^ 



^=F 



g^g^^g^ 



^ 



^-sr^r 



1. Je - 6U3 died on Cal-vary's mountain, 



Long time a - go, 



And sal - va-tion's roll - ing foun-tain, 



Now free - ly flows! 



i^tcr 



fc^-]^jr ; ^fF^^f^ E^ 



-G 



2. Once his voice in tones of pi - ty, 



Melt-ed in wo. 






wept o'er 



Ju - dah's cit - y, 



Long time a - 



-4^—0 



3. On his head the dews of midnight, 

Fell, long ago, 
Now a cro'ivn of dazzling sunlight 
Sits on his brow. 

4. Jo'.ds died — yet lives forever, 

No more to die — 
Bleeding Jesus, blei^sed Saviour 
Now rcij;ns on high I 



5. Now in heaven he's interceding 

For dying men. 
Soon he'll finish all his pleading. 
And come again. 

6. Budding fig-trees tell that summer 

Pawns o'er the land, 
Signs portend that Jesus* ooming, 
\s near at hand. 



Children, let your lights be burningt 

In hope of heaven, 
M'aiting for our Lord's returning 

At dawn or even. 
^V^lcn ho comes a voice from heaven 

Shall pierce the tomb, 
" Come, yo biessod of my Father, 

Children, come no'^-V 



814 



CONTENTED SOLDIER. L.M. 



Wm. Walker. 



^ 



S 



-^H 



1. I've list - ed in the ho - ly war, Till the war-fare is 
Con - tent to euf - fer sol - dier's fare, Till the war-fare is 



ver, hal - le - lu - jah ! "l 
ver, hal - le - lu - jah! J 



Cry - ing a - men, shout 







2. The ban - ner o'er my head is love. Till the war -fare is o - ver, hal - le - lu - jah ! 1 „ . 

I draw my ra-Uons from u - bove, TiU the war -fare is o - ver, hal - le - lu - jah! / '^rj ■ jDg a - men, shout 



-^ 



3 



-4 



m=£: 



^ 



5 



PSEP 



PPfS 



^ 



s 



on till the war - fare ia o - ver, hal - le - lu - jah I 



^ 



^ 



f=F 



on till the war -fare ia o - ver, hal - le - lu - jah! 



i!Et 



^^?^ 



5. Fve four;bt through many & battle sore, 

Till the warfare 13 over, hallelujah I 
And I must flight through many more, 

Till the warfare is over, &c. 
4. I take my hreast-plate, sword, and BhieM, 

Till the warfare is over, h.illelujahl 
AikI boldly march into the field, 

Till the warfare la over, Ac 

6. The world, the flesh, and Satan too, 

Till the warfare is over, hallelujah I 
Unite and etrive what they can do; 
Till the warfare is over, Ac. 

6. On thee, Txjrd, I humbly call, 

Till the warfare is over, hallelujahl 
Ujibold me or my soul must fall, 
Till the warfare i*" over, Ac. 

7. Tve listt^, and i mean to fight 

TiU the warfare Is over, halleligabi 
Till all my foes are put to fiight; 
TUl the warfare is over, Ac. 

8. And when the victory I have won, 

Till the warfare is over, hallelujah . 
rii iilf c the praide to (<od alone, 



HH Ih^ 



. 4ft. 



9. Come, fellow -Christians, join with me. 

Till the warfare is over, hallelujahl 
Come, fece the foe, and never flee, 
Till the warfiire is over, Ac 



Come, take the field, and i 
Till the warfare is over, Ac 

11. With listing orders I have come; 

Till the warfare ia over, halleluja 
Come rich, come p^-or, come old or KttUfj, 
Till the warfare Ia over, Ac. 

12. Here's grrace's lounty, Christ lif|^i fH»en, 

Till the warfare U over, hnlleUijahl 
And glorious crowns laid up ia he«TMi: 
Till the warfare ia over, Ac. 

13. Our Oeu'ral he !s gone before. 

Till the warfare is over, hallelujahl 
And you may draw on gnioa's .sLui e. 
Till the warfiu-o is over, Ac 

14. But. ifyou will not list and 3^'ht, 

Til! the warfare b over. halleliu»i»' 
Yuu'llsirik into uturual ot^h:. 
Till tiie warrar* 'g o»»r. Ar 



DAYSPRING. 8,7. 



315 



^ 






i=± 



t^Bi 



m 



1. Chris -tian, see the o - rient morn - ing Breaks a 



the hea - then sky; Lo! th' ex - poet - ed day is dawn - ing, 



'i 



^ 



5 



^f=B 



g ^^ 



±s: 



^ 



? 



^ 



-*=^ 



2. Heath-ens at the sight are sing - ing, Mom - ing wakes their tune - ful lays ; Pro - cious off' - rings they are bring - ing, 



^^ #-2-^ 



^ 



£ 



£ 



^ 



^ 



Zi - on's sun, 



va - tion beam- ing. Gild- ing now the ra - diant hills. Rise and shine till bright- er gleam - iiig. 




-■ — ■— s: — r~ir~p — jj k — r~r~ f'm r~f r — f~ — f-'-r-T- — f—f — p^-- 





Glo-rious day-spring from on high. Ilal - - le - lu - jah! Hal - - - le - lu- jah! Hail the day-spring from on high I 



e^= ^^^.^3 ^f^^^^E|g3^fFF^Pl 



It 



First fruits of more per - feet days. 



le - lu - jah 1 Hal 



Te - lu - jah 1 Hail the day-spring from on high ! 



, 1 f^- r I r~rrT~rT 



t=p 



All the world thy glo - ry fills. 

4. Then the valleys and the mountains, 
Breaking forth, in joy shall sing; 
Then the living crystal fountain 

From the thirsty ground shall spring. 
Halleluiah :|{: Hail. &c. 



"6* \ ^ 

Hal - - le - la -jah I Hal - - - le - lu- jah! Hail the day-spring from on highl 



5. While the wilderness rejoices, 
Roses shall the desert cheer ; 
Then the dumb shall tune their voices, 
Blind shall see, the deaf shall hear. 
HaUelujah :|1: Hail, &o. 



6. Lord of every tribe and nation. 

Spread thy truth from pole to pole ; 
Spread the light of thy salvation 
Till it shines on every soul. 
Hallelujah :|J: Hail, &a 



316 



ANTIOCn. C. M. 



Arranged from Handel. From tne Carmina Sacra,. 




jfH^^P 



Fa^ as the curse is found. 



.S^^ff 



And heav'n and na-ture sing, 

2. Joy to the world, the Saviour reigns, 
Let men their songs employ ; 
While fields and floods, rocks, hills, and plains 
Bopeat the sounding joy. 



And heav'n and na-ture sing. And heav'n, &c. 

No more let sin and sorrow grow. 

Nor thorns infest the ground ; 
lie comes to make his blessings flow 

( Far OS the curse is found 

\ Second Ending. 



Far, &c. 

4. He rules the world witn truth ■•ind grace. 
And makes the n;itions prove 
The gluries of his righteousness. 
And wonders of bis love 



BENEVENTO. 7s. (Double.) 



S. Webbe. 



31 ; 



1 — r 



s? 



3=f^^^^^^^^^^ 



^^^3=E|g 



While, Tfith ceaseless course, the sun Uast-ed thro' the for - mer year, Man - y souls their race have run, Nev - er more to meet us here: 



5^ 



^^^ ^^fh^- il j-^ -^ ^^^^=£:^U=^ 



irzi 



'W^~ ^ r~^ 



^^^m. 



■U. ^ w 



5:=^ 



a 



l=E& 



iz=^ 



iI^=S=^ 



j^ tt*. 



l |j4^JJ Jg ;^g ^J4Jd-JJ4J^^-tJdd=i[Jdd:j :jg ^"^ ^ 



I i*»i r» 



4:1 



3^^ 



s#fefe^E#i^:i 



s 



Fix'J in an c - ter - nal state, They have Jone with all be -low; We a lit - tie long - er wait. But how lit - tie none can know. 




O _»' O 



t\ _ ^^^r^ 



i 



d — 9 — d — * 



'—e 



^~F~F" 



is 



m 




JORDAN'S SHORE. CM. 



J. T. White. Psalmist, Iljinii 1172. 



~^^^^^^^^^m 



er side of 
side 



Oq 
To 



Jor-dan's storm-y banks I staad, And cast 
Ca-naan's fair and hap - py land, Where my 



a wish - ful eye On the 
poa - ses-sions lie, On the 



oth 
oth 



Jor - dan, hal 
Jor - dan, hal 



3^ 



:^^3EJ 



^^ 



jah 
jah 



i} 



I 



2. Oh! the trans-port - ing, rapt'rous scene, That ri 
Sweet fields, ar - ray'd in liv - ing green, And ri 



scs to my sight! On the 
Ters of dc - light, On the 



oth- 
oth- 



er side 
er Bide 



Jor - dan, hal 
Jor - dan, hal 



f 



lu - jah 
e - lu - jah 



S-^ 



g^gJBEH 



M: 



3EE 



!} 



^^ 



O'er all those wide - ex - tend - ed plains Shines one 
There God the Son for - ev - cr reigns, And scat 



e - ter - nal day, On the 
ters night a - way, On the 



oth 
oth 



Jor - dan, hal 
Jor- dan, hal 



lu - jah 
lu - jah 



1} 



e^^^^ 



I I ^ ^ ^-^ 



=FT=P 



1^ 



E? 



^ 



l^ k^ U" 



g^^ 



m 



On the oth - cr side of 



Jor-dan, hal - le - 



jah, On the oth - er side of Jor-dan, hal - le - lu - jah! 



m^^^^ 



tfvFf w 



eE^ 



^ 



■ — ■ 



i. No ehilUng winds, nor pois'nous breath 
Can reach that healthful shore; 
Sicl<nefls and sorrow, pain and death 
Are felt ami /i-iir'd ii.i iwv~ 



5. When shall I reach that happy place, 
And be forever blest ? 
When slinll I see my Father's face. 
Ami in hii< bii3om real' 



6. Fill'd with delight, my raptured soul 
Would here no longer stay ; 
Tliough Jordan's waves stioiiUI round me roll 
I'd foavless lauiicii rtwii-;. 



IMMENSITY. L. M. 



£ 



g 



CaldweU. 819 

±1 



^ 



1. There is a world we have not seen, That time shall 
Where mor - tal foot - step hath not been, Nor ear hath 



nev - er dare de - stroy. 1 ^^ ; . . , 

caught its sounds of joy: J ° 



F^ 



s 



2. There is 
And nev 



world, and oh I how blest, Fair - er than 
did an an - gel guest One half its 




|g 



proph-ets ev - er told, ' 
bless - ed - ness un - fold : ^ 



^ 



It is all 



g^l 



5^ 



•^ I :l I F- Q _LLJ: 



ho - \y and bp- 



^=^? 



I I 




3. It is not fann'd by summer gale ; 

*Tis not refresh'd by vernal ehow'rs j 
It never needs the moonbeam pale, 

For there are known no evening hours : 
No, fur this world is ever bright 

With a pure radiance all its own ; 
The stream of uncreated light 

Flows round it from Lli' etcruul Lhruod. 



4. There forms that mortals may not see, 

Too glorious for the eye to trauo, 
And clad in peerless majesty, 

Move with unutterable grace: 
In vain the philosophic eye 

May seek to view the fair abode, 
Or fiL I it in the curtain'd sky: 

It i& iLu dwelling-pliico ul OiHL 




1. Behold! be -hold the Lamb of God! Oa the cross, on the cross n qj^ , j^^^^. ^j^ ^j, . ;^ ^ .^^^^ , j, . i; ^ - ma ga - bach-tha-ni ;" 

He sheds for you his precious blood, On the cross, on the cross ! J 

-Nt 1^ 




D. C. Draw near and see T«ur Saviour die, On the cross, on the cross ! 



i^^S|gg^^ g^¥ ^T lr£J^^5 E 




Behold his arms extended wide, On the cross, &c. 
Behold his bleeding hands ami side, On the, &c. 
The sun withholds his rays of light. 
The heavens are clothed in shades of night, 
While Jesus doth with dovils fight, On the, &c. 



Come, sinners, see him lifted up. On the, &c. 
For you he drinks the bitter cup, On the, &c. 
The rocks do rend, the mountains quake, 
Whilo Jesus doth atonement make, 
While Jesus suffers for our sake, On the, &c. 



And now the mighty deed is done, On the, &c. .fi 

The battle's fnught, the victory's won. On the. A* > 

To heaven he turns his languid eyes, 

*' 'Tis finished," now the Conqueror cries. 

Then bows his sacred head and dies. On the, &o )( 



Where'er I go I'll tell the story, Of the, &c. 

Of nothing else my soul shall glory, Save the, &o. 

Yea, this my constant theme shall be. 

Through time and in eternity 

Ihut Jesus tasted death for me. On the, &o. 



Let every mourner rise and cling, To the, .Vc. 

Let every Christian come and sing, Kound the, &o. 

There let the preacher take his stand. 

And, with the Bible in his hand, 

Declare the triumphs through the lana. Of the, &c. 



CONCOED. 11,8 



£ 



s^^^fe 



p — #-P^K 



Caldwell. 321 



~^M 



V 



1. le ob - jecta of aeuse, And en - joy - menta of time, Which oft have de - light - ed my heart, 



i^ k_:zi: 



^ 



^-^ 



^±ruJ-i-J^ 



St 



^ 



2. Thou lord of the day, and thou Queen of the night. To 



ye no long - er are known. 



r ^T^-=^n3 !fiif ^^T^^^lT"a 



E^ 



h-^ 



£ 



m 



efee 



s^ 



s^ 



m 



Boon shall ex - change you for yiews more sub - lime, For 



that shall ne - ver 



- part. 



SI 



±±: 



-^^m: 



?=£ 



1^ 



:i-i: 



±±: 



soon shall be - hold 



""6? ^ 

with in - crens - ing de - light, A sun 






that shall nev - er go down. 
±1 



^^i 



4. Ye wonderful orbs that astonish my eyes 
Your glories recede from my sight, 
I soon ahall contemplate more beautiful skies, 
And stars more resplcndeutly bright. 
•21 



Ye mountains and valleys, groves, rivers inJ plains, 5. 

Thou earth and thou ocean, adieu ! 
More permanent regions where righteousness reigns, 

Present their bright kills to my view. 



My loved habitation and gardens adieu, 
No lorger my footsteps ye greet, 

A mansion celestial stands full in my vieir. 
And pa'odise welcomes my fset. 




SAMANTHRA. 11,8 

3? 



^^PS^-fe^P 




The ce-dars of Le - ba - non bow at bis feet, The air is perfumed with his breath. 



His lips as the foun - tain of 



^ 



■ H 



te TT-rt JEJ 



S 



sif 



0! thou in whose pre- senoj my soul takes de- light, On whom, in af - fiic-tion, I call; I 
My com - fort by day, and my song in the night, My hope, my sal - Ta - tion, my all — j 



Where dost thon at noon-tide re- 
>- i^ > - _ 



fe§ 



P^ 



^m 



u u 



^^ 



righteousness flow. That wa-ter3 the gar -den of grace; From which their sal -ra- tion the Gen- tiles shall know, And bask in the smiles of his face. 



^^ 



i^^i^^l^a 



. U« k^ ^ — »-n S*- — ^^ ^ — ^gr- ^"' 1 — "if '^ ™ ^ 

sort with thy sheep, To feed on the pas-tures of love 1 Say why in the val - ley of death should I weep, Or a - loue in th' wilder-ness rove 



fcf: 



^'l il\n\ i ^Vj^^=f^ ^^3^E^E^^ ESE^^E^ ^^^3^^^ 



I 



2. 01 why fhould I wander an alien from thee, 

And cry in the de»;ert for bread? 
Thy ffe3 will rcjuice wheu my sorrows they see. 

And jiinile at the tears I have shed. 
fe (I-iuKhters of /.ion, declnre. hare you seen 

The .Sl.ir that on Ismei Khone? 
&xy if hi your xvr.-? my h.-li.v.-.l \\fji hecn, 



3. «M*hat is thy Beloved, thou dignifii^d fair I 

AVhat excellent beauties has be? 
Ilis charms and pt-rfectionp b« pleased to declare, 

That we may embrace him with thee." 
This \» my Beloved, his form is divine; 

liis veritments shed odour around: 
Thn I.vks on his h.-,id aro r« itinp."; nn the vine, 

Wh-wi uuluiitii wiih pi. ..iy L- c.-..wuU 



I. The ro';es of ?haron. the liiios that prow 

In t he v;ilcs, 0:1 the banks of the streams. 
On Ills rh(x-!NS in the beauty of excolltsuc^ blow. 

And 111? "VPS are as quivers of Ifoam*. 
Ilis voire x* the sound of thedulrimer, sweet. 

Is heard through the shadows of death; 
Th" .^■<I:.is ..( l,.-l.anijn l>-iw at his 1v*'U 

Ibo uir u> iK;rfutuad wiUi hi* tr%»t^ 



CHRISTIAN PROSPECT. L. M. 



Win. Walker. 



323 



1. We have our tri - als here be - low ; 0, 




F±rrr^-Ef 



P 



ry, lial - le - lu - jiih! 



We have cur tri 



here be - low; 



gj :^ f1 '- ^^^i ^^g|EiEeEJ^ #r^PF=^ ^^ - 



A few more beat - ing winds and rains, 0, 



ry, hal - le - lu - jah! 



few more boat - ing winds and rains, 



t ^nz-t'xx 



3. A few more ris - ing and set - ting suns, 0, glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jah! A few more ris - ing and set - ting suns, 




ffrttrr^Jtm ^ 



b, glo-ry, hal - le - lu -jah! There's a bet-terday a com - ing, hal - le - lu-jah! There's a bct-terday a com-ing, hal -le - lu-jah! 






0, glo - ry, hal - le 



lu - jah! And the win-ter will be 



gg^i?=Pd^^:^E^^g^fp^Pr^ ^^E^ 



ver, hal - le - lu - jam And the win- ter will be o - ver, hal - le - lu-jah! 



t:aEiz2£^?Eb 



f 



£? 



m 






^l^ 



0, glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jah ! And we'll all cross o - ver Jor - dan, hal - le - lu - jah ! And we'll all cross o - ver Jor-dan, hal • le - lu -jah ! 



4. I feel no ways lllce getting tired. 0. glory, hallelujah r 
I am makicjf for the harbour — Uiillylujiih' 

5 1 hope to get there by ana by, 0, glory, hallelujuh ! 
For my borne is orttr Jord^Q — IlalleliuiLh: 



6. I haTO porae friends before me gone. 0, glory, hallelujuhl 
By ;ind by 1*11 go and meet tbeni — IIaU«lujahl 



8. 0!- how it lifts my soul to think, 0. glrry. hallelnjah' 
Of soon meeting lu the kingdom— UaUelujah' 



324 



REMEMBER ME. G.M. 



Z. J- Jones, 



^ : 



^m 






3 



i 



-& #- 



a 



^M=m 



^&^ 



^ 



ig I . ^, r - f 



v=% 



m 



^^a 



A - las 1 and did my Saviour bleed? And did my Sov'rcign die? 1 Re.mem-ber, Lord, thy dy-ing groans, And then re - mem-ber me. 
?ould he de - vote that sa - cred head For such a worm as 1 ? J 



S±^ 



^^^^=:^ 



£ 



3 



? 



INTERCESSION. S. M. 



T. C. Moffett. 



^^^^EE ^S^f=f=^'^^^:^^\^fm^ ^ 



r^ 



p-f-p- 



^ 



'^B^Ef^^^ E^E S:^^^^^^^^ 



tei 



1 

1. The Lord is ris'n in -deed, And are the ti - dings true? Yes, we be - held the Saviour bleed. And saw him liv - iug too. 



2. The Lord is risen indeed. 

Then hell has lost his prey, 
With hiiu is risen tne ransom seed. 
To le'gn in endless day. 



The Lord is risen indeed. 

Attending angels hear; 
Up to the cnurt." <>'. heaven with speed, 

Th-i io^ful tidings bear 



4. Then make your golden lyres, 

And strike each cheerful chord; 
Join all ye briglit, celestia' choirs. 
To smg our risen Lord. 



FOUNT OF GLORY. Ss & 7a. 



R. W. Tkompsvn. 



-^:- 



-4-f 



EP^ 



^ 



•^ 



'-^ 



f^^F^ 



^ 



1. Far from nior - tal cares re - treat - ide;, Sor - did hopes and vain de - sires, 1 r' .1, <■ , . e i» _„ v„ 

„ 11 ■ r 1 1 i. • r> . 1, » i. V > • >• iTom the tount of glo ry beam- 

Here our will - ing foot-steps meet - ing, Et - ry heart to heav n as - pires. 1 a j 




4r^ 



3 



E3 



^ 



'^- 



3 



=F 



-g — g r 



^ 



^ 



2. Who shall share this great sal - - va - tion? Kv' - ny pure and hum - blc mind, I 
Ey' - ry kind - red, tongue, and na - tion, From the stains of guilt re - fined, j 



Bless-ings all a - round be - stow- 




-r- 



f I- I f-ff^ 



ing,. Light ce - les - tial cheers our eyes, Mer - cy from a - bove pro - claim - ing. Peace and par - don from the skies. 



13 



S 



IS 



e: 



2 



^s 



± 



1 



dzt^: 



ing, God with - holds his care from none, Grace and mer - cy ev - er flow - ing From the foun - tain ot his throne 



3St 



1 r 



f^^^=^ 



^i 



326 



S -^ 



HOPEWELL. L. M. 
r — ■ 



^ 



!£ 



L. J. Jones 



f^- 



4r^-^ 



& 




^ 



^ 



i^ ^s^a^ 



1. Je - EU3, my all, to heav'n is gone, He whom I fix my hopes up - on;") 
His track I see, and I'll pur - sue The nar-row •way, till him I view./ 



^ 



u 



Ilal - le - lu - jah! Hal - le - lu - jah! 



u 



TTfr-rv =r 



gs^a 




^ 



W 



?^=^ 



:^ 






^j$^:j=r+sBa 



±i 



Hal - le - la -jah! I love the Lord: 



This note 



This is the way I long have sought, 
And raourn'd because I found it not; 
My ^icf and burdeu long has been, 
Because I was not saved from sin. 
IJallelujah, &c. 



bove all oth - ers raise, My Je - sus has done all things well. 



3. The more I strove against its power, 
' felt its weight and guilt the more . 
Till late I heard the Saviour say. 
Came hither, sonl, I am the way. 
y^ Hallelujah, iic. 



CUR JOURNEY HOME. 8s&7s. 
e o m 



L. J. J one* 



527 




1. Come, thou fount of 67* - ry blessing, Tune my heart to sing thy grace ; Streams of mer-cy, ne - vcr ceas - ing. Call for songs of loud-est praise; 



^^l^^i 



^^1 



Mpi 



8* ©L 



szik: 



*-# 



JBLZJt 



2. Here I raise my Eb - en - e - zer, Ilith-er by thy help I'm come : And I hope, by thy good plea-sure, Safe - ly to ar - rive at home 

HH-P-T-P<8 rn n — n r -j-fi I'^. ^ i g ^ 



II III ^ T 



?^=F3 



S 



3. 0! to grace how great a debt - or Dai-ly I'm constrain'd to be! Let that grace, Lord, like a fet - ter Bind my wand'ring heart to thee ! 




b 



Je-sus sought me when a stranger, AVand'ring from the fold of God; lie, to save my soul from dan - ger, In- ter-posed his pre-cious blood. 



I? 



5^=P^ 



:iH 



g: 



3E 



3z:x:: 



Prone to wan-der, Lord, I feel it ; Prone to leave the God I love — Here's my heart, Lord, take anijl seal it. Seal it from thy courts n, - bove. 
ChvTua — Hal-le - lu-jah! Ilal-le - lu-jahl We are on our journey home; Ilul-le - lu- jiih! Hal-le - lu-jali! .le - sus smiles and bids us come 



r'o": ^ 




MISSIONARY FAREWELL. 



8,7,4. 



FT'?!. Walker. 



fl— P 



ei^ 



^ 



-a-- 



^^ 



-4^ 



^^FF 



1. Yes, my 
Friends, con 



na - tive land, I love thee, 
nex - ions, hap - py coim-try ; 



All thy scenes I love them well ; I 
Can I bid you all fare-well ; / 



1^ 



^^ 



f 



i 



"D-^ 



Can, I leave you. Can I leave you, Far 



£ 



F=EE 



2. Home! thy joys are pass-ing love-ly! 
Hap - py home! 'tis sure I love thee! 






Joys DO Btran-ger heart can tell ! 1 
Can I, can I say fare-well ? J 



£E^^4^^# 



Can I leave thee. Can I leave thee, Far 



H 



e--- 



•— (S- 



^^ 




3. Scenes of sacred pence and pleasure, 4. Yes, I hasten from you gladly. 



Holy days and Salibath bell, 
lUchest, brightest, sweetest treasure ! 

Can I Bfiy a last farewell ? 
fan I leave you — 
far 111 heathen lands to dwell? :|j: 



I'rora the scenes I loved so well! 
Far away, ye billows, bear me ; 

Lovely, native land, farewell ! 
I'leased I leave theo- 
Far in heathen lauds to dwell. :!: 



5. In the deserts let me labour. 
On the mountains let me tell 
How He died — the blessed Saviour — 
To redeem a world from hell ! 
Let me hasten — 
Far in heathen lands to dwell. :||* 



1 r 

C. Bear me on, thou restless ocean ; 
Let the winds my canvas swell — 
Heaves my heart with warm emotion, 
While I go far hence to dwell. 
Glad I leave thee. 
Native land — Farew«U — Farewell I :U 



THOU ART PASSING AWAY. lis. 



From Rusiell's •' Mind of the Winter Xlcht." 



as a miJ-summer day; Thy forehead is 




S^ Wf^^ 



2. Thou art pass-ing a - way from Wie beau-ti-ful earth, Thy muohlov'da - bode, and the land of thy birth; From its for-ests 



^^^^^^^^--^^ 



^ 



&^rct^i ^g 



££ 



3. Thou art pass-ing a - way from thy kindred and friends, And thelastchain that bound thee, the spoiler now rends; And thy last tones 



?^P?ffj^^ f^ fNTrc-g"ir-:tda 



pale, and thy pulses are low, And thy once blooming cheek wears the o-mi-nou3 glow. 




S VrhiT 






m 



^^=F^ 



i^m 



and fields — from its murm'ring rills, From its beau-ti-ful plains and its herbage-crown'd hills. 



— I ^ ^--^ — >-V 



szt 



^^ 




ore falling on love's Ust'ningear. And now in thine eye shines the fonj, parting tear. 



4. Thou art passing away, as the first summer rose, 

That iiwaits not the timo when the Winter wind blowa, 
Eut hasteth away on the Autumn's quick gale, 
And scatters its odors o'er mountain and dale. 

6. The light of thy beauty has faded and gone, 
For the withering chills have already come on; 
Thy charms have departed — thy glory ia fled; 
And thou soon wilt be laid in the house of the dead. 

6. Thou shalt soon be consigned to the cold, dreary tomb, 
-The lot of all living — mortality's doom : 

Thou shalt there sweetly rest in the calmest repose, 
Undisturbed by life's car<?s, and unpiercod by its woes. 

7. "Who, who would live always away from his God? 
Away from yon heaven, the blissful abode, 

Where the rivers of pleasure flow o'er the bright plains, 
And the noontide of giory eternally reigns?" 



330 



OLIVE SHADE. 8,0,8,4. 



Col. Daniel Smith. 



3^^ 



37=1 



Ezia 



glS^ 



TP^ 



^S^H 



B=.i: 



3-a— J- 



^g 



cti^zat; 



SSJ 



P=l 



1. Fa-ther, who in the o - live shade, When the dark hour came on, Didst with a breath of heav'u-ly aid, Strengthen thy son 

-e — 



^ 



:3Z3s: 



i^ia 



,g' J 



m 



2. Oh, by the anguish of that night, 
Send u9 down blest relief, 
Or to the chastened let thy might 
Hallow this grief. 



3. And thou that, when the starry sliy, 
Saw the dread strife begun, 
Didst teach adoring faith to cry, 
Thy will be done. 



AMHERST. H. M. 6,6,6,6,8,8. 



i. By thy meek spirit, then of all. 

That e'er have mourned the chief, 
Blest Saviour, if the stroke must fall. 
Hallow this grief. 

Billings. 




1. Lord of the world.? a-boTe, How pleasant and how lair The dwellinjs of thy love. Thine earthly tern -pies are; To thine iibole My heart a.<!-piro8, Wth warm de-sires, To see my Hod 



l ^=^^f£|^ ^^ H£-^- 



^fSiE 



fff ^ 



F^ 



tP 



±6^ 



fB-. 



2. The Bparrow for her young. With pleasure seeks her nest; And wand'ring swallows Ions; To find their wont- ed rest; My spi-rit faints With o-qual zeal. To rise and dwell Amons thy sainUi. 



SSSiigS^ 



ZXlt^tZIZLZP 



3. Oh happy eouls, mat pray ^Vhcroaod appoints to hear! Oh happy men, that pay Their con- stant .wrrice there I TheypralM thee still; And happy th«y. That lov« the way To 7.inn"e hiU 



. u. :& glow. 



Z^^ f^r^ ^ 




COME, YE DISCONSOLATE. 11.10. 



Swan. 



33] 



:2Z 



Estee 



1. ComCj ye dis - con-BO-^;itej where'er ye 1 



I — [' — : — p» .F<» I 






h : Come to the mercy-seat, fervently kneel ; Ilei 

s 



p^gga^g 







^^EieP^n 



^^»^iSP 



I briug your woundcLl heart.?, here tell your anguish ; Earth has 



that heav'n cannot heal. 



019~9 






k^ 



Joy of the desolate, light of the straying, 
Hope of the penitent, fadeless, and pure, 

Here speaks the Comforter, tenderly saying, 
Earth has no sorrow that hcav'n cannot cure. 



Smooth and cheerful. 



TENDER CARE, or SODA. CM. 



3. Here see the bread of life ; see waters flowing 

Forth from the throne of God, pure from above J 
Come to the feast love ; come, ever knowing 
Earth has no sorrow but heav'n can remove 

F. 31. AtMey. 




trfszi: 



- ing Boul sur - veys, \ 
I - der, loTe, and praise. J 



- ber'd com • forts to my fioul, Thy ten • de 



^gg^gg^^^ Sg^^^^aa^ i^g 



D. C. Be - - foro my 







^z^. 




GREENLAND. 7.6. 



Swan. 



With Cmmpw. 



E^E^ 



£ 



P^ 



pgEgEg- rrcTTi '^^j^ 



1. Why sfloulJ I be af- fright -ed At pes-ti-lence and war, The fiero - er be the tem - pest, The soon-er it is 



£ 



5 



1^ 



^=g^ 



^ 



SS^ 



^ 



?^53; 



5 



SeS 



2. With Je - sua in the tbs - sel. The bil - lows rise in Tain, They on - ly -will con - vey me To yon E - ly - siau 



-§t> 



& 






- u u u L . 



~r~~v~ 



=f^^ 



3. This world is full of dan - gers, And foes that press me hard ; But Je - bus he has pro-mised That he will be my 




^ 



-Q — m » #" 






^ ■ • ^ 1 : ^ !^ "w" 

o'er. The soon - er it is o'er. The soon - er it is o'er. The fiero - er be the tempest. The soon - er it is o'er. 



w 



^^^^p^^^^a 



plains. To yon E - ly - sian plains. To yon E - ly-sian plains, They on - ly will con - rey me To yon E - ly - sian plains. 



^ ^^^^^^^m^^^^^ 



1 



guard. That he will be my guard, That he will be my guard, But Je - sus he has pro-mised That he will be my guard 



4. Here I shall not be tempted 
Above what I can bear, 
When fightings are exerted, 
Hid kingdom for to share. 



5. From him I have my orders, 
And while I do obey, 
I find his holy epirit 
Illuminates my way. 



6. The way is so delightful, 
I wish to travel on. 
Till I arrive at heaven. 
T' receive a starry crown. 



Che<^rftil, t.Wf^t i 



RAPTURE. 6, G. 9 



3f. L. Swan. 



335 



'^-^-^ 



K^of: 



IH 



ggfe^?^?N^^^gpgg^PPi 



!-#■-*- 



prr^^xz^ 



FF 



•g tf 



ik^ 



gf P^^ j ^^ ggfetejggSiiill 



•Comea-way to theskies,5Iy be ■ lor-ed a-iise, And rtgoice in the day thou wast hora; On this feati-ral day, Come ei-ulUnj a-way, And with singing to Ziou re - turn. 



^J^iJ^'ttZ ^^Mf- 



ffi 



— k-k 



Eft 



'^"~4 r- 



1 yy 



:z_& 



;^^?^ 



V ' i.^ >' 



S 



:«:"j!:at,ji: 



rf£ 



Tg'"?" 



* For the balance of this song, see page I 

NEW YEAR. S. M. 



p^: 



1 



P. 31. Atchley. 



:^:=±^^R 



-N tx 



P^H^P^ 



^sia 



New Treble by WiLu.iM Walkek, A. S. II. 
^±^ 1 - - . O 



.&- 



^; 



^ ^ 



-e-j-^T-g^-h^-tfia- 



1 






E - ter - ni - ty Jrawa nigh, Life's pe-ri - od rolls on, An-oth-er leaf from time's thiu scroll, Is swift -ly ruslt-ing by. 

I ^ |g3-^ ^ . — ^-a B m . . I ^:^ 1 §_ 




p^f!te^^PS5 



SfeS 



et=£^^ 



m 



>^^:' 



THE CHRISTIAN'S FAREWELL, lis. 

P- 



^^s^m 



1-^ 



|B- 



-gr^M 



^^^4^ 



^f 



1. Fare - well, my dear breth - ren, the time is at hand That wo must be part - ed from this so - cial band : 



^^^^^^^^^^^ 





2. Fare - well, faith - ful sol-diers, you'll soon be dis - charged. The war will be end - ed, your boun - ty cu-Iarged, 

^ 



'-^ 



^^0^ 



^^^^=f^ 



3. Fare - well, young - er breth - ren, just list - ed for war, Sore tri - als a - wait yon, but Jc - sus is near; 




-f—f- 



I I r 



£ 



Z^HZai 



s 



Our sev' - ral en - gage-ments now call us a - way. Our part - ing is 



izirs: 



^£ 



.-^_ 



-a- 



^ 



EP^^P 



need - ful, and we must 



bey. 



E&fe 



-fes £s~ 



AVith shout -ing and siuj - ing, though Jor - dan may roar, You'll en - ter fair Ca - naan, and rest on the shore. 



-^ 



T=F TI=^'j 



S 



-^ 



-f^ 



-^ 




Al- though you must tra - vcl the dark 'wil - tier - ness, Vour Cap - tain's bo - - fore you, he'll lead you to peace. 



%. Farewell, trembling mourners, with snd broken hearts, 5. Farewell, careless sinner.*', for yoa I mu?t mourn, 6. F:irewcll, my dear brethren, farewell all aroun-1, 
hasten to Jesus, and choose the guud part ! To think of your danger, if still unconeorn'd ; Perhaps we'll not meet till the last trump shall soiiod 

Ila'fl full of compassion, and mighty to eave, I read of (he judgment, where all must appear, To luoct you in glory I give you my hand, 

SiU arme aro extended, your touls to receive. How will you stand trembling with tormenting foar! Our Saviour to jtraue in a pure social banJ 



GENEllAL INDEX. 



A'.abima _.rngo..llO 

Alljion 23 

AU is well SUB 

Am.-rica 27 

Amherst 330 

Amity _ 282 

Amity 311 

An Address for all....:... 99 

Aritioch 316 

Arlington 285 

Aylesbury 2S1 

Azmon 181 

B. 

Bdbe of Bethlehem 78 

R:(bel Streams 52 

B.ihylonian CapUvity...l61 

BMllerm.1 2157 

B-illstown 102 

Behold the LamborUo<1..32i) 

Brnevento 317 

Bnund for CoD.ian 193 

Bower of Prayer 70 

Bozrah 39 

Brace's Address 132 

a 

Canon 19 

Captaio Kidd 50 

Cliarlestown 23 

Cheerful 91 

China- 276 

Christian, or Camsville. 26 

Christian Song 129 

Christian Conliicts 131 

Christian Prospect 323 

Christian Soldier, C. M.. 45 

Christian Soldier 95 

Christian Warfiire 37 

Christian's Farewell 334 

Christian's llope 7-1 

Claremont 1S3 

Columbus 55 

Come and taste with me.105 

Come ye Discon 2'J4,331 

Communion 10 

Complainer IS 

Contidence 35 

Concord 321 

CondeRcension 312 

CcQsolation— 17 

Consolation new 5S 

Ccntented Soldier 314 

Converted Thiof 9 



Cororatlon 299 

Cookham 

Cross of Christ 35 

Crucifixion 

D 

Bay of Judgment 84 

Baris -. 15 

Baviu's U-imentation 21;] 

Bayspring 315 

Belight 102 

Belisht_ 167 

Derrick. 199 

Detroit 40 

Devotion 13 

riple 123 

Distress 22 

Dove of Peace 89 

Drummond 106 

Dublin 

Dudley 250 

Duke Street 291 

DunLap's Creek 270 

E. 

Easter Anthem 190 

Kden of Love 309 

Kdom 177 

Eltham 307 

Elysian- 100 

Eton..!..™.!!..'.......!!!.. ..181 

Evening Shade 46 

Exhilaration 54 

Exultation 88 

F. 

Fairfield 48 

Faithful Soldier 122 

Family Bible. 20 

Farewell 81 

Farewell Anthem 214 

Female Convict 100 

Fiducia 92 

Florida 120 

Fount of Glory 325 

French Broad 2i>5 

Funeral Anthem 187 

Fuueral Thought 257 

a. 



Oood old TCny 156 

Gospel Tidings 273 

Gospel Trumpet '271 

Greenfield 121 

Greenland 332 

Green Fields 71 

n. 

nail Columbia 141 

Hallelujah 139 

Hallelujah, CM 1*7 

U.appiness 3S 

Hanover 4 

Happy Land 89 

Harwell 192 

Heavenly Armour 93 

Heavenly March 253 

Heavenly Vision 206 

Hebron 2SS 

Hebrew Children 266 

Hick's Farewell 10 

Holy Manna 103 

Hope 272 

Hopewell 326 

Humble Penitent 172 

Huntington 169 



31 



Idumea 

ImanJra 134 

Imandra new 34 

Immen.sity 319 

Indian Convert 133 

Indian's Farewell 25 

Indian's Petition 269 

Intercession 324 

Interrogation 249 

In that morning 194 

Invifition 2 

Invitation new 303 

Invocation 72 

Ionia 165 

Isles of the South 86 



Jordan's Shore. 318 

Joy to the world 281 

.lubil.e US 

Judgment 47 



Kejron 



King of Peace- 6 

Kingvood 98 

KnoxvUle 140 

L. 

Land of Pleasure 63 

Legacy 73 

Leander 12S 

Lena 149 

Lenox 77 

Liberty 68 

Lindan 168 

Lisbon 154 

Liverpool 1 

Lone Pilgrim 256 

Long sought Home 302 

l*ong Time Ago 313 

Ixiuisiana 62 

Luther 159 

M. 

.Martial Trumpet 61 

Marysville 6 

Mear 24 

Meditation 4 

Mercy's Free 304 

Mes.siah 97 

MidOlebury 17 

Midni'AtCry S2 

MiUedgeviUe 300 

.Millennium 75 

Minister's Farewell 14 

Mission 96 

Missionary Farewell 328 

Missionary Hymn HI 

Missionary Song 197 

Missionary's Adieu 290 

Mississippi 148 

.Montgomery 170 

Alount Zion 175 

Morality 44 

Morning Star 115 

Morning Trumpet 195 

Morning Worship 285 

Mouldering Vine 87 

Mutual Love 53 

N. 

Nashville. 271 

Never part .Hg,aia. 198 

New liriUiin 8 

Newburgh 296 



New Topla ..163 l 

New Jerusalem 125 

Ninety-third Psalm 7 

Ninctv-fitXh Psalm 27 

Northfidd 2S3 

0. 

Ocean 180 

come, come Away 144 

Ode on Science 210 

Ohl turn. Sinner 263 

Old Hundred 22 

Olive Shade 330 

Olney 64 

Ortouville 10 

Our Journey Home 327 

P. 

Pacolet 106 

Pardoning Love 268 

Parting Friends 35 

Parting Hand. 113 

Pastoral Elegy 147 

Penitent's Prayer 290 

Pilgrim 150 

Pilgrim's Song 106 

Pilgiim's Farewell 158 

Pilgrim's Lot 138 

Pisg.ah 80 

Pleasant HUl 66 

Plenary 262 

Portugal 287 

Portuguese Hymn 136 

Precious Bible 311 

Primrose 3 

Promised Land r 51 

Prospect 92 

Prospect of Heaven 24 

Peterborough... 183 

B. 

Rapture 333 

Redeeming Grace 56 

Redemption 108 

Remember me 324 

Repentance 161 

Repose 151 

Re.sij.-n.ition 26 

Restoration 5 

Rhode I.-^land 145 

Kipley 292 

Ko.li.sler '279 

Rockliri.l,^- 28S 

Rockingham 16? i 

l;c»-tiu=ham 300 1 

Uock of .tges -n I 

UosiLab Lady t;2 ! 



illome 1S2 

Saints bound for Ucaven.25S 

Saint's Delight 104 

.Salem. CM 12 

Salem, L.M 63 

Salvation 84 

Samanthni 322 

Sardina 126 

Salutation 143 

Schenectady 178 

Separation 30 

Sharon 121 

Shepherd •235 

Shepherd's Star 310 

Sherburne 280 

Shirland 2S6 

Silver Street ■2S0 

Sincerity 101 

Singing Christian 204 

Social Band 112 

Solicitude 09 

Solitude new 173 

Soldier's Return 36 

Solemn Thought *29 

Something New 254 

Spiritual Sailor 41 

Sprague 281 

Stanton 274 

Star in the E.ast 10 

Star of Columbia ■2'0 

Stonington '270 

Supplication 5 

Sullerings of Christ 85 

Suffleld 31 

Sweet Affliction 250 I 

Sweet gliding Kedron...'200 I 

Sweet Harmony 59 j 

Sweet Heaven .312 I 

Sweet Home 251 

Sweet Solitude 156 

ot l-rospect 137 I 

Sweet Rivers 



335 

HJs world ta wot my 

home :;93 

Thorny Desert 83 

Thou art passing away..32'i 
Thou art gone lo the 

Gr.ave 160 

Traveller 79 

Travelling Pilgrim 313 

Transport 162 

TribuJ.ition 119 

True Happiness 127 

Trumpet 57 

Turtle Dove 43 

0. 

Union 39 

Upton 163 

Uxhridgo 173 

V. 

Vernon E4 

W. 

Wnrrenton 94 

Washington 67 

Watchman 281 

Watchman's Call C5 

War Department 94 

Warwick 201 

Weary Pilgrim's Conso- 

laUon 298 

Webster 10 

Weeping Saviour 7 

Welch 109 

Mclls 273 

Welton 1.03 

We.sley 114 

When I am Gone 305 

Whitestnwn 135 

Willnughby 277 

Wilmot 105 

Windb.nm 48 

Winter 29.'! 

I Wondrous Ix)VO 25U 

Woodland 110 

Wo 



ister . 



..157 



Tender Cai 

Teunejsee 

The good ohl Way. 
The .Narrow Way.. 

The Rock 

The TrumpeLurs ... 



Soda....331 i 
... 2S 
...l.iO 



..SOI I /lull's Light . 



336 



t.M. 

nallatowu rage..! 62 

Ik-bold the Lamb of God..3-20 

Chtistian Prospect 323 

Contented Soldier 314 

DeTOtioa 13 

Distress 22. 

DukG Street 291 

Kxhilaralion 51 

French Broad 265 

Glasgow 295 

Hebron 288 

Hopewell 326 

Humble Penitent 172 

Huntin-ton 169 

Immensity 319 

la that morning 19i 

Jerusalem 11 

Kedron 3 

Lindaa IGS 

MarysviUe 6 

Meditation 4 



Mif 



96 



Nashville 271 

OhI turn. Sinner 2«3 

Old Hundred 22 

Parting Hand 113 

l^U^rim's Sonj^ 106 

Portugal 2S7 

Prospect 92 

Uedeuiption. lOS 

llockbriilge 288 

Kocliingliam 168 

Sailor's Home 182 

Salem 53 

Schenectady 178 

Sherburne 280 

Social Band 112 

Supplication 5 

Sweet Heaven 312 

Sweet Solitude loa 

The good old Wav 136 

The Narrow '(Vny 289 

Travelling Pilgrim 313 

Turtle Dove 43 

Upl-on 

Uxbridge 173 

Vernon 34 

■Washington 67 

Watchman's Call 05 

Wells 27S 

■Welton 133 

■Whitestown 



Win 



48 



Youii;; (JouvolU 3US 



CM. 

Alabama 116 

An Address for all 99 

Antioch 316 

Arlington.- 285 

.A.zmorL. 181 

Babel Streams 52 

Ballerma 267 

Chin.a 276 

Christiou Soldier 45 

Columbus .. 55 

Condescensira 312 

Consolation 17 

Coronation 299 

Detroit 40 

Dove of Peace 89 

Dublin 13 

Dudley 250 

DunLap's Creek 276 

Edom 177 

Fairfleld 48 

Fiducia 92 

Georgia 72 

Gospel Trumpet 271 

Hallelujah 107 

Hanover 4 

Happiness 3S 

Heavenly March 253 

Hick's Farewell 19 

Joy to the world 281 

Jordan's Shore 318 

Leander 128 

Liberty 68 

Liverpool 1 

Long sought Home. 302 

Mear 24 

Messiah 97 

Milled-eville 300 

Minister's Farewell 14 

Missionary's Adieu 290 

Montgomery 170 

Never part again 198 

New Britain 8 

New Orleans 76 

Niucty-flftli Psalm 27 

Northfield 283 

Ortonvillu 10 

Pardoning Love 208 

Penitents Prayer 290 

Pilgrim 160 

Pisgah 80 

Ple.isant Hill CO 

Plenary 262 

Primrose 3 

i'rtimued Laud 51 



MET 

Remember me 324 

Kepentance 161 

Rosi;,'nation - 38 

Rochi-ster 279 

Rockingham 300 

Salem 12 

Salviitir.n 84 

Surdina 126 

Separation 30 

Solitude new 173 

Something New 254 

Sprague 284 

SulHeld 31 

Sweet I'rogpect 137 

Sweet Rivers 166 

Tender Care, or Soda....331 

Tennessee 28 

The 'rrumpeters 301 

This world is not my 

home 293 

Tribulation Il9 

Warwick 291 

■Wesley 114 

Winter 293 

Woodland 110 

S.M. 

Albion 23 

America 27 

Aylesbury 281 

Evening Shade 40 

Florida 120 

Gospel Tidings 273 

Hope 272 

Idumea 31 

Intercession 324 

Kambia 154 

Lisbon 154 

Luther 169 

Mount Zion 175 

Jlorning Worship 285 

Newburgh 296 

New Year 333 

Ninety-third Psalm 7 

Shepherd 235 

Shirland 286 

Silver Street 280 

Stonington 279 

Watchman '284 

Webster 10 

Wecping"Sa7iour 7 

Worcester 157 

U. M. 

Amherst 3-30 

Delight 167 

Lenox 177 



RICAL INDEX 



L. P. M. 

Greenfield 121 

P. M. 

All is well 306 

Babylonian Captivity...l64 

Jubilee 118 

New Topia 163 

Portuguese Hymn 130 

Sharon 124 

C. M. D. 

Converted Thief. 9 

Cross of Christ 35 

Derrick. 190 

lis. 

Bower of Prayer 70 

Cheerful 91 

Christian's Farewell 334 

Drummond 196 

Imandra new 34 

Imandra l-'jl 

Isles of the South 80 

Sincerity 101 

Solicitude 69 

Star of Colivnbia 2C0 

Sweet gliding Kedron. -.200 

Theltock 60 

Thou art passing away..3'29 
War Department 94 

Trumpet 67 



Sweet Harmony.. 



Bound for Canaan 193 

Christian CouBicts 131 

Complainer 18 

Delight 102 

Essay 255 

Faithful Soldier 122 

Gotid Physician 49 

Greenland 332 

Holy Manna 103 

Missionary Hymn Ill 

Morning Trumpet 195 

Mutual Love .53 

Romish Lady 82 

Singing Christian 264 

Spiritual Siiilor "41 



elle 



Zion's Light '270 



Land of Pie 



8.7. 



63 



Babe of Bethlehem 78 

Charlestown '23 

Dayspring 315 

Disciple 123 

Fount of Glory 325 

Il.arweU 193 

Invocation 193 

Jefferson 42 

Lena 149 

Louisiana 62 

Mouldering Vine 87 

Olney 64 

Our Journey Home 327 

Parting Friends 35 

Repose 151 

Restoration 6 

Ripley 292 

Soldier's Return 86 

Sweet Affliction 259 

Thorny Desert 83 

■Warreutou 04 

11,8. 
Concord 321 



Davi; 



13 



Samanthra 322 

6,6,9. 

Esultation 88 

Middlebury 17 

Rapture 333 

10,11. 

Star in the East 16 

8s. 

Green Fields 71 

New Jerus.alem 125 

Pastoral Elegy 147 

Sullerings of Christ 85 



Unii 



. 39 

Amity 311 

Benevento 317 

Canon 19 

Cookham 8 

Eltham .307 

Eton , 181 

Interrogation 249 

Ionia 165 

King of Peace 6 

Wilmot 165 

12.9.6. 
Wondrous Love 232 

8,10. 
Legacy 73 



12,11. 

Family Bible 20 

Farewell 81 

Funeral Thought 267 

Transport 152 

6 line 7s. 

Indian's Farewell 25 

Rock of Ages 275 

Stanton 274 

7,9. 

Cruciflsion 25 

Martial Trumpet 01 

11,10. 

Come ye Discon 294,331 

Shepherd's Star 310 

9,8. 

Redeeming Grace 56 

1-2,S. 

Pilgrim's Farewell 158 

12,9. 
Saints bound for neaven.258 
Thou art gone to the 

Grave 160 

8,8,6. 

Consolation new 68 

Garden Hymn 90 

Indian Convert 133 

King^vood 98 

Pilgrim's Lot 138 

Rhode Island 145 

Willoughby '^77 

8,7,4. 

Invitation 2 

Invitation new 303 

Missionary Farewell 328 

Missionary Song 197 

Zion 278 

10,10,11,11. 

Confidence 33 

6,6,8,6,6,8. 

Amity 282 

6,6,9,6,6,9. 

True Happiness 127 

.0,8. 

When I am Gone 306 

10,11,11. 

Morality 44 

11,11,'.1,5,11. 

Sweet Home 251 

11.8,11,8. 

Lone Pilgrim 'CoO 

12.9.1'2.1-2.9. 

Solemn Thought '29 

12,12,12,13. 
MiUunnium 75 



12,12.12.12,11. 

Indian's Petition 269 

12,11,12,11,12,1'^2,12,11. 

Eden of Love 309 

Weary Pilgrim's Conso- 
lation -298 

8,8,8,8,7. 

EnoxTille 140 

8,7,8,8,7. 

Prospect of Heaven 24 

8,8,8.8,8.3. 

Royal Proclamation 146 

11.11.6,6,7,6. 

Day of Judgment 84 

8,6,8,4. 

Olive Shade 330 

8,6,8,6,8,6,8,7. 

Hallelujah 139 

12,11.11,11,12,1L 

Christian Warfare 37 

7,7,7,6,7,7,7,6. 

Bruce's .\ddress 133 

7,7,7,6,7.7,7,6. 

Christian, or Carnsville. 26 

8,8,8,6.8,8,8,6. 

Christian's Hope 74 

7,6,7,6,7,7,7,7. 

Elysian 100 

7,6,7,6,7,7,7,6. 

Invocation 72 

7,6,7,6,7,6,7,7. 

Midnight Cry 32 

7,6,8,8,8,6. 

Hebrew Children 266 

6,4,6,4,6,7,6,4. 

Uappy Land 89 

6,6,4,6,6,6,4. 

T Haven 159 

7,6,8,7,7,6,7,6. 

Salutation 143 

8,8,7,8,8,3,3,3,3,8. 

Mississippi 148 

8,8,7,8,8,7,7,9,8. 

Morning Star 115 

6,6,6,3,6,0,6,6,6,8. 

Captsin Kidd 40 

7,8,7,8,7,8,7,8,7,7,8,8. 

Christian Soldier 96 

7.7.7.7.7.7.9.6. 
Come and taste with mclofi 

9.6,9,8,8.8,0. 
Jlercy's Free .101 

Proi-lous Bible' . '. .tU 



I I 



E. W. Mi^x^EB, 



< >]' 



QUARTO FAnr«>.Y e: 



s. 



,f**^^?c 



ICEI*ir IE 






F?' 



XXOS. C&; 3LXO-4 SkjaLXKT&tOXKK IS'3ClEt3SllSi*X?